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Full text of "Royal purple"

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PRINTED AND BOUND BY 

UNION BANK NOTE CO. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 



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.^Copyrighted by^ 
W J. LGDMI5 
WN.iKOURUP 

GW5HAVE&> 
19 <^\^> 



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Kansas $tate J 
^Agricultural Colkge 
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~Z\s an expression of our appreciation of 

l)is enthusiastic support of alt things for 

tfye betterment of tl)e College anb in 

recognition of tl)e success of l)is 

efforts, we, tl)e ciass of 1915. 

respectfully dedicate tl)is, tl)e 

Seventl) Volume of tl)e 

3\oval "purple to 

Wm. ~J\. Uar6me 

~3><2.an of trje "Division of Agriculture 





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inures iDon't Cie 



'Tin tb,e making of this book the material passed 
** through the hands of 250 people. In the edition 
there are four tons of paper, 50 pounds of ink and 
500 skins; the sheep were grown in Australia and 
the skins prepared in Spain. 3,000 pounds of 
monotype metal were used. Orje ink and the foil 
were imported from (Bermanv. 

C ob/is volume was printed and delivered 10 davs 
after the last cop? was proof read. Dt would require 
one man 7 months to set the tvpe for this book, ohere 
are 23,140,000 page impressions in the printing of 
this volume and it would take 10 ?ears to print this 
book if onlv one impression were made at a time. 



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(Totitettts 



THE CAMPUS 

Views 

The Future 
THE COLLEGE 

Division of Agriculture 

Division of Engineering 

Division of General Science 

Division of Home Economics 

The Faculty 
CLASSES 

The Graduate Class 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 
ATHLETICS 

Football 

Basketball 

Baseball 

Track 

Class Athletics 
THE TROOPS 

Officers 

Companies 

Rifle Club 

Band 

Scabbard and Blade 
ORGANIZATIONS 

Honor Societies 

The Greeks 

Literary Societies 

Clubs and Associations 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Publications 

The Platform 

Special Events 
SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Classes 

Athletics 

Literary Societies 
POINT, PUN & QUIP 

Calendar 

Things We WEREN'T Paid to Tell 

What's Left 

S nap-Shots 
ADVERTISING 





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I The Campus 

II The College 

III The Classes 

IV Athletics 

V The Troops 

VI Organizations 

VII Student Activities 

VIII Point— Pun & Quip 



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TO MY COUNTRYMEN: 

"My thought is of America. I am speaking, I feel sure, the earnest 
wish and purpose of every thoughtful American that this great country of 
ours, which is of course, the first in our thoughts and our hearts, should show 
itself in this time of peculiar trial a nation fit beyond others to exhibit the 
fine poise of undisturbed judgment, the dignity of self control, the efficiency 
of dispassionate action; a nation that neither sits in judgment upon others 
nor is disturbed in its counsels and which keeps itself free to do what is hon- 
est and disinterested and truly serviceable for the peace of the world." 

"I venture therefore, my fellow countrymen, to speak a solemn word of 
warning to you against that deepest, most subtle, most essential breach of 
neutrality ivhich may spring out of partisanship, out of passionatzly taking 
sides." 

"Shall we not resolve to put upon ourselves the restraint which willbring 
to our people the happiness and the great and lasting influence for peace we 
covet for them." 




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Oo tl)e JFacult? 



Z3o tbose wl>o toil day after day tt»at tljey 

Mtay lead our growing minds in proper ways. 
Our youthful tongues fling fortl) fond songs of praise. 

Wl)il£ in our bosoms hearts fast beating pay 

"3V nobler tribute far too deep to say 

In ordinary words, tljougl) tl)ick tl)e maze 
Of myriad doubts and fears tl)eir gleaming rays 

Reveal tl)e patl) tl)at leads to truth's bright da?. 

1\s climb tl)e tender woodland vines along 

<&reat stalwart trees until tjeaven's migl)ty blue 
Speaks to t^eir wondering souls, so we on strong. 

Kplifting men strive upward until we. too 
Sljall witl) pure, trusting spirits calmly view 
I3l)e beauty of a life to nature true. 



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"Sl)0ul6 aul6 acquaintance be forgot 
anb never brought to mine ? ' 



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A Corner of the Campus 




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Ol)£ ^Division of Agriculture 



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THE courses in agriculture are designed, primarily, to train for the profession 
of farming and the teaching of agriculture in the public schools, and for en- 
lightened community service. 

The great purpose is to provide such a liberal, thorough, and practical education 
as is necessary for efficient work and citizenship. With this end in view courses in 
agriculture are offered that will appeal to young men who desire to enter farming as 
a profession. While the industrial and technical work is emphasized, the importance 
of a thorough general training, or culture, is recognized. Thus may be met the demand 
for a broad or general education supplemented by special technical training. The 
mind, the eye, and the hand are educated to act in unison. The mental and the bodily 
faculties are so coordinated as to develop a symmetrical manhood and a just appre- 
ciation of clean, upright citizenship. 

The first two years' work is the same for all agricultural students. It consists 
of work in chemistry, English, biology, and agriculture. In the last two years students 
are permitted to choose a large portion of their work, under an elective system. By 
prescribing a large part of their studies during the first two years, and by leaving a large 
part of the work of the last two years to the selection of the student, but under a definite 
system, the College endeavors to give a wise measure of direction, leaving, at the same 
time, sufficient room for choice to encourage individual adaptation and special develop- 
ment. 

It is the belief of the institution that technical knowledge and skill should be de- 
veloped along with, rather than at the expense of, those things which make for the 
production of cultured and versatile men. For this reason the technical work in agri- 
culture is closely associated with related sciences offered by other divisions of the in- 
stitution. The courses are so balanced, or arranged, as to divide the time of the student 
about equally between subjects of a technical character and subjects which develop the 
general knowledge and breadth of view which characterize cultured people. 

The Division offers more than seventy courses in technical subjects, or agricultural 
science, and gives opportunity for electing from the scientific and literary courses of 

34 

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other divisions of the College. Each student, moreover, is given ample opportunity, 
after reaching his junior year, to specialize along any of the several lines of agriculture. 

The entrance requirements for students in agricultural courses are the same as for 
students entering any of the other courses of the College, and four years of creditable 
work are necessary in order to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. 
In addition to the successful completion of the prescribed courses and the courses elected, 
candidates for degrees are required to have had at least six months of practical farm ex- 
perience, under the direction of an accredited farmer. This last requirement, together 
with the advantages open to all agricultural students at the College for practical work 
in all phases of farming, supplements their education along definite lines and sends them 
out more practical and readily serviceable men. 

The fact that at the Kansas State Agricultural College there are maintained a 
sufficient number of animals of the different leading breeds of live stock, and large 
fields devoted to the production of all crops common to this region, grown under all 
methods of soil management, cannot but leave an impression with the student that will 
greatly strengthen the technical work he receives in agricultural science. 



35 



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iDepartment of .Agronom? 




The foundation of a sound and profitable system of 
farming is a thorough scientific and practical knowledge 
of the handling of the soil, the growing of field crops 
and the management of the farm business. It is the work 
of the Agronomy Department to teach these things. 

It is a comparatively easy matter to farm in such a 
way that large and profitable crops will be produced 
from new and fertile land if no investment is made in 
the permanent upkeep of the soil — it is an infinitely 
harder problem to remove paying crops from the soil 
and at the same time handle it in such a way that its 
fertility will not be impaired. In no large area of the 
United States has the farming during the past twenty- 
five years or longer been of such a character that the 
soil is now in as high a state of fertility as it was at the 

beginning of that period. If this condition is changed in the future, it will come as the 

result of education and a more thorough knowledge of the soil. 

Of no less importance is an accurate knowledge of the improvement and production 
of field crops. All other enterprises of the farm are gauged by the size and quality of 
the crop grown. The live stock and dairy farmer is usually limited in his enterprise by 
the amount and quality of the feed crops produced. To him, his live stock furnish a 
market for his crops and the size of his business is determined by the size of the crop he 
has to market. A practical knowledge of field crops is, therefore, important not only 
to the grain farmer who sells his crop on the market, but also to the live stock and dairy 
farmer as well. 

The management of the farm business has received too little attention at the present 
time. One of the most important lines of work of the Department is the teaching of 
farm management. Secretary David F. Houston has said, "The business of the student 
of farm management is to make an analysis of the operations of the farmer to study the 
proper adaptation of the type of farming to local conditions, such as soil and climate, the 
size of the market, market demands and transportation, the quality of the farm business, 
its diversity, its organization, the distribution of farm enterprises and the cost of each 
sort of product." 

The Agronomy Department, therefore, in its training of students in farm manage- 
ment, field crops, and soils, lays the foundation for all types of farming. 



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X5l)e department of -Animal 3*fusban6r£ 






The work of the Animal Husbandry Department is 
designed to give young men the best possible training 
for livestock farming, to develop breeders of pure-bred 
livestock, and to equip teachers and investigators in 
animal husbandry. In the experimental work of the 
department, the main object is to conduct research work 
which will help solve the fundamental problems in ani- 
mal nutrition and animal breeding, and to demonstrate 
practical methods of increasing the efficiency of feeds and 
the animals consuming them. 

The departmental work is divided into four distinct 
lines: Instruction which is carried on in the class 
rooms and laboratories and includes courses in the 
feeding, breeding, judging, production, and management 
of livestock. The maintenance of herds of pure-bred 
breeding animals and of show steers which are used 
primarily to give the students a correct conception of the types of animals for Kansas 
farms and the show ring. Investigational work conducted in animal nutrition and ani- 
mal breeding to solve fundamental problems confronting breeders and feeders. The 
practical feeding and breeding of livestock which is demonstrated in the management 
of the breeding herds and the feeding of experimental animals for market purposes. 

The first students were graduated from a four-year course in animal husbandry in 
1910, and, including the present class, 1915, 114 young men have completed the course. 
These young men are interested in livestock farming and 54 per cent, of the men in the 
five classes graduated are on farms and 80 per cent, of these are in Kansas. Practically 
all of the men not on farms are teaching agriculture, doing agricultural extension, demon- 
stration and experimental work, or are active in livestock marketing. Only 5.5 per cent, 
of all the graduates are in lines of work other than agricultural. 

The breeding herds on the farm include pure-bred representatives of four breeds of 
beef cattle, four breeds of horses, three breeds of hogs, and six breeds of sheep, which, 
with the grades, total 590 animals. Annual sales are held at which surplus breeding 
stock is sold for the purpose of giving students an idea of the proper methods of con- 
ducting public auctions. 

These herds also demonstrate methods of practical feeding and breeding. The de- 
mand for breeding animals bred and developed on the department farm indicates that 
livestock breeders and farmers approve of these methods. During the present year, 
1914-1915, a double deck carload of Western lambs was fattened on Kansas feeds, 45 
calves were wintered on roughages usually found on every farm, 45 calves are being 
fattened, 14 draft colts were brought to maturity and demonstrate practicable and pro- 
fitable methods of utilizing Kansas feeds. 

The investigational work is carried on with cattle, horses, and hogs. This work is 
done under conditions and with facilities which permit the keeping of individual records 
on the behavior of a large number of animals. This work is supported almost entirely 
by funds from the United States Department of Agriculture. 



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i)ain> JDepartment 




The courses offered in Dairying are so planned as 
to give students a working knowledge in the subject 
which will fit them to take up practical work along this 
line. There are also courses for the student who desires 
to become a specialist in experimental dairying, giving 
him a foundation for graduate work. 

It is optional with the student whether he elects 
work along the creamery or commercial line, or in dairy 
production, which deals with the dairy farm manage- 
ment, and handling the herd for profit. 

The dairy farm of 50 acres is used to make demon- 
strations in growing different feeds for the herd. The 
dairy barn provides room for 80 head of cows and is 
modern in every respect. The dairy herd consists of 
100 head of cows and heifers, representing the four prin- 
cipal breeds, Jerseys, Guernseys, Holsteins, and Ayr- 
shires. The highest records of all breeds in the state are held by cows in the college 
herd. Maid Henry, a thirteen-year-old Holstein, made 835 pounds of butter in a year. 
One Jersey cow has a record of 765 pounds of butter in a year. One Ayrshire has pro- 
duced over 700 pounds of butter in a year. During the past year seven of the cows have 
produced an average of 700 pounds of butter. The entire herd made an average produc- 
tion of almost 500 pounds of butter last year. The average production per cow for the 
entire state during the same period was 120 pounds of butter. With these cows it is 
possible to give the best of training in judging, selection, and breeding of dairy cattle. 
The cows and young stock are used in making experiments in feeding, etc. 

The department has a creamery in operation the year round. This is used to give 
the students experience in this line of work. The creamery is equipped with churns, 
pasteurizers, ice cream freezers, Babcock testing machinery, and cream separators. 
Additional cream for butter making purposes is purchased from farmers near Manhattan, 
and the creamery is carried on a self-supporting basis. 

Much of the milk from the dairy herd is sold as retail milk, and the students have 
opportunity to make studies along this line. 

There is a constant and growing demand for specialists in dairy work. In fact, 
the demand is far greater than the supply for men that are properly trained and equipped 
for this work. Positions are open to graduates as managers of dairy farms, teaching in 
colleges and high schools, butter makers, experiment station work and many other. 



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JDepartment of Hforticulture 

The work of the Horticultural Department includes 
the teaching of classes in various lines of Horticulture. 
The only one of which is required of all students in the 
Agricultural Course is Plant Propagation. In this course 
the laboratory work is so planned that each lad has a 
chance to know how cuttings are made, how seeds are 
grown, how trees are planted and grafted. The only 
systematic instruction in grafting offered by the Depart- 
ment is given in this course. 

Students who elect work in the Horticulture De- 
partment are given specfic instruction along three gen- 
eral lines: fruit growing, vegetable growing and the grow- 
ing and use of ornamental shrubs and trees. 

Students in the pomology classes the fall terms of 
the Junior and Senior years seem to appreciate the op- 
portunity given to them to become acquainted with 
varieties of fruit provided by the Department for their 
study. For several years the Department has arranged with similar departments in 
Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Missouri, Washington, Oregon, and Indiana to 
make an exchange of varieties, giving the student an opportunity to compare varieties 
grown under different conditions and also to study varieties now grown in Kansas. 

The laboratory classes in Orcharding have for their laboratory work practical work 
in spraying and many visitors to these classes have insisted that this Department has 
the best equipped laboratory for giving instruction in spraying of any institution in the 
country. The 1915 class had practice work with five power sprayers and three power 
potato sprayers, hand pumps, nozzles and other equipment without limit. Every stu- 
dent who has had this work never forgets the preparation of Bordeaux mixture and lime 
sulphur or the test for arsenate of lead or free arsenic. 

One of the preventives of student enjoyment in the spring term is the market 
gardening laboratory. Each student who is assigned to market gardening is assigned to 
a particular plot of ground in the gardens and after he has prepared a plan of his own 
for his garden, he is provided with seed, hoe and rake and told to "go to" now and make 
his garden, following out his plan and coming to the "Boss" for instructions. There are 
many who have gone out to teach Agriculture in the high schools, who have found the 
note books prepared on these gardens of considerable value in preparing lectures for 
their laboratory classes. 

In the landscape gardening classes the student has the opportunity of making plans 
for various types of plantings, such as lawns, parks, school grounds and home grounds 
and of becoming familiar with the varieties of shrubs and trees that produce the best 
landscape effects. 

Not included in the actual teaching work of the Department is the outside work 
carried on in various lines. For the past two years Instructor Lewis and Assistant 
Merrill have had direct supervision of a large number of co-operative experiments with 
farmers over the state. Practical co-operative work has been carried on with potato 
work in the Kaw Valley and in sections of the state where commercial fruit growing is 
practiced. Professor Ahearn has made many trips over the state advising Civic Improve- 
ment Societies and Mothers' Clubs as to the means of improving parks, and school 
grounds and interesting them in general improvement work. 



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Ol)e JDepartment of Jpoultr? 3fusbait6r? 





The courses of study offered by the Poultry Depart- 
ment have three purposes in view. The first is to give 
the student who wishes to return to the farm practical 
training along poultry management lines. The second 
is to give elementary training in preparing poultry pro- 
ducts for market to those who wish to engage in the 
poultry packing business. The third is to give a thor- 
ough technical training to those students intending 
to become teachers or investigators in poultry husbandry. 
The department is provided with the necessary 
facilities for giving excellent work in all three lines. The 
poultry plant lying just off the northeast corner of the 
campus contains eight acres. It is equipped with mod- 
ern buildings and appliances to which others are constant- 
ly being added. The last additions were provided for 
by the acts of the last legislature for a brooder house 14 x 
100 feet to be used as a laboratory by the classes in brooding and a mechanical refriger- 
ating plant to be used in co-operation with the Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairy 
Husbandry, and Veterinary Medicine. 

Besides three permanent laying houses 15 x 30 feet, there are eighteen portable 
colony houses of varying sizes and types. One laboratory building is given over to milk 
feeding, killing and dressing poultry and candling eggs. Another building houses an 
incubator laboratory in the basement and a feed room above. 

The work in Poultry Husbandry is so arranged that all students taking the general 
agricultural course have a three hour course in Farm Poultry Production. A somewhat 
similar course under the title of Poultry Management is required of all students in Vet- 
erinary Medicine. Elementary courses in poultry keeping are required of all students 
of the school of Agriculture. A course called Beginning Poultry is provided for the young 
men and another called The Elements of Poultry Keeping is given the young women. 

The elective work follows the two general lines of poultry management on the farm 
and the packing of poultry products for consumption. Along the line of management, 
courses in which the facilities are furnished so that the students can have actual practice, 
are offered in poultry feeding, incubation, brooding and caponizing. A special course in 
Home Poultrying, open only for young women, is provided for those of the Division of 
Home Economics who wish poultry work. 

Along the line of preparing poultry commercially, courses are offered in candling, 
to determine the commercial grades of eggs, milk feeding, to properly finish the birds, as 
practiced in the packing houses, and killing and dressing. 

In addition to these courses two courses in judging are offered for those who wish to 
become instructors of Poultry Husbandry. There is also a course on the Bacteriology 
of Poultry Diseases in Poultry Production, offered through the courtesy of the Bac- 
teriology Department. 



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Ol)d JDepartmettt of Jforestr? 




The Forestry Department of the Kansas State 
Agricultural College is responsible for the dissemination 
of information throughout the state, concerning forest 
conditions, and advice regarding methods of handling 
woodlots. This work embraces the renewal of stands of 
timber in the present native woodlands, as well as that 
of planting artificial woodlots. The natural woodlots of 
the state occupy what is usually termed waste land, 
and the object is to improve the stand of growing timber 
so as to make it yield as great a return as possible. 
Under practical management this timber land can be 
made to yield nearly as good returns as agricultural 
lands. 

Furthermore, this department is charged with the 
encouraging of tree planting throughout the prairie sec- 
tion of the state, and in this connection maintains a 
state nursery at the Hays Branch Experiment Station, Hays, Kansas, in which there are 
growing at the present time over one million trees. This stock is composed of hardy 
species suitable for Western Kansas planting, consisting largely of broadleaved species. 
However, a small section of the nursery is devoted to the growing of conifers, consisting 
largely of pines, cedars, arbor vitae, and firs. The nursery stock produced at both sta- 
tions is sold at cost of production, and in every case it is the aim of the Department to 
send out only such stock to the various sections of the state as is best adapted to the 
climatic and soil conditions there. 

The instructional work in forestry offered at the Kansas State Agricultural College, 
is given by this Department, and consists of three courses: Dendrology, Silviculture, 
and Farm Forestry. The object of these courses is to familiarize the students with and 
assist them in identifying our native trees and to understand the conditions under which 
they grow and develop, so that in handling woodlot propositions, they may do it intelli- 
gently and with an understanding of the problems involved. 




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iDepartment of Mlilling Ha6ustr^ 



Kansas produces on the average more wheat than 
any other state in the Union. Kansas ranks second in 
the quantity and value of wheat flour produced. Hence 
it is fitting that Kansas should establish at the State 
Agricultural College a well equipped Milling Industry 
Department for investigating the milling and baking 
qualities of wheat, the factors which influence these 
qualities, and the problems which arise in the manufac- 
ture of flour. 

This Department was established in 1910 and the 
College model mill is the largest and most completely 
equipped plant connected with any college in the country. 
It has a capacity of 75 barrels of flour in each twenty- 
four hours and the results secured with this mill are com- 
parable with those of any similar commercial plant. 

The Department also has a well equipped labora- 
tory for experimental baking tests and for chemical determinations on wheat and flour. 

The question of how best to care for the wheat crop after it ripens in the field is an 
important one. How much does the exposure to weather damage with subsequent 
bleaching and sprouting injure the milling and baking qualities? What effect has such 
damage upon grade and market price? What beneficial results measured in dollars and 
cents can be obtained from properly caring for the wheat until it reaches the miller? 
All these are problems of vital importance to the wheat grower and an effort is being made 
by the Milling Industry Department to solve them. 

What effect has crop rotation, soil fertility, and seed bed preparation upon the 
milling and baking qualities of wheat? Which varieties are good and which are poor 
from the standpoint of the miller? By close co-operation between the Milling Industry 
Department and the Agronomy Department at the College these questions are being 
investigated. This work necessarily covers the field from the kernel of seed wheat to 
the finished loaf of bread. 

The College is offering a four-year course in Flour Mill Engineering and with the 
exception of Pennsylvania State is the only school offering work along this line. 



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Ol)e Veterinary iDepartment 




The Kansas State Agricultural College was among the 
first institutions of learning to recognize, as the whole world 
is now trying to recognize: That it is just as honorable to 
guide the plow as to guide the Ship of State. 

That it is just as honorable to minister to the physical 
needs of the lower animals as to guide an erring soul on its 
heavenward way: 

That it is just as honorable to be queen in a household of 
three or six as to rule nations of people. 

That it is just as honorable to minister to the relief of a 
dumb brute as to minister relief in the halls of Justice. 

Acting upon these fundamental principles and realizing the necessity of 
broadening the scope of the work done at K. S. A. C, the Board of Regents at their 
meeting in April 1905, voted to establish a full four-year course in Veterinary Medicine; 
a course embodying all the training necessary to equip its graduates to compete with 
those of any other similar institution in existence, a course from which a graduate may 
feel he has something which the world cannot ignore: the necessary equipment where- 
with to make an honest and respectable living in an honored profession; a sufficient 
guarantee against all possible emergencies in making a success in life. 

Each of these graduates is "making good" and is an honor to his Alma Mater. He 
rapidly becomes a leader in his community and wields a great influence toward better 
living. He is getting out of life much more than many who occupy a much so-called 
higher station — contentment. 

The graduate from this course does not think he is lord of all creation: as he grows 
older he thinks more on these things and as he thinks he grows more and more to realize 
that the hand that molds the flour is the hand that rules the world. Neither does he 
forget in his search for fame and fortune and in his efforts to "make good" the flowers 
that bloom by the wayside, for after all, there is no real living without them to brighten 
life and home. 

The growth of the department since its establishment, its present standing among 
other similar institutions and the success of the four score of its graduates testify to the 
wisdom of the Board's action. 



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Z3l)e (Tollege of engineering 



"3 sing tl>e<2. sons, of Oubal (Lain." 

— Whitman 





Dean A. A. Potter 




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Z5I)£ division of ""Engineering 




UNDER the Division of Engineering are included the following teaching and 
research departments: Applied Mechanics and Machine Design, Architecture 
and Drawing, Civil and Highway Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Farm 
Machinery, Shop Practice, and Steam and Gas Engineering. Also, the following 
operating departments: General Repairs, Heat and Power, and Printing. The De- 
partment of Printing also gives a limited amount of instruction along the lines of printing 
practice. 

The teaching departments give instruction to five different classes of students: 

First, to students pursuing the professional courses in engineering. 
These professional courses include Civil Engineering, Electrical En- 
gineering, Mechanical Engineering, Agricultural Engineering and 
Architecture. 

Second, to students in the Division of Agriculture, Division of 
General Science, and the Division of Home Economics, who seek 
instruction in architecture, drawing, shop practice, farm motors, 
concrete construction, and similar engineering branches. 

Third, to students who elect trade-practice courses and the 
Mechanics Arts in the secondary school of Agriculture. 

Fourth, to Short Course students who pursue the ten-weeks short 
course in traction engines, shop work, road building, or concrete 
construction. 

Fifth, to Short Course students who take the majority of their 
work in one of the other Divisions, but who elect shop work, gas 
engines, drawing, or traction engines. 

The research carried on by the faculty of the Division of Engineering is part of their 
work in connection with the Engineering Experiment Station which was established for 
the purpose of carrying on tests and research of engineering and manufacturing value. 
Among the tests which have been recently completed or are now being carried on, are: 
tests on Kansas sands, automobile oils, illumination, concrete, gas engines, traction 
engines, road building, and similar problems which are of interest to the engineering 
profession in general and to the people of Kansas in particular. 

The officers of the Division of Engineering and of the Engineering Experiment Sta- 
tion are frequently consulted by municipalities, state institutions, corporations, and in- 
dividuals regarding various matters of engineering and manufacturing. The Division 
of Engineering also conducts classes during the State Farmers' Institute, in traction 
engines, concrete construction, gas engines, shop practice, road building, rural archi- 
tecture, and electricity. 

The value of the equipment in the teaching and research departments of the Division 
of Engineering is equal to about $125,000. This does not include buildings or the value 
of the equipment in the operating departments. 

The Division of Engineering has supervision of the generation of steam for heat 
and power; the pumping of water; the distribution of steam, water, gas, and electricity; 





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Ol)e Division of ^Engineering — (Tontinuei 




building construction; improvements and repairs about the College; plumbing and elec- 
tric wiring for the various buildings; and the construction of models, equipment and ap- 
paratus for the various technical and scientific departments of the College. 

The value of the equipment in the operating departments of the College is equal 
to about $120,000. 

The students pursuing the various professional engineering courses have an organi- 
zation called the "Engineering Association," the object of which is to aid the students 
in the Division and to improve their general standards. Besides this, the Engineering 
Division has a branch of the "American Institute of Electrical Engineers," of the 
"American Society of Mechanical Engineers," of the "National Association of Stationary 
Engineers," a "Civil Engineering Society," and an "Architects Club." There is also 
a chapter of the "Sigma Tau Honorary Engineering Fraternity" which is composed of 
students who have excelled in scholarship and who show evidence that they will be 
successful as engineers. 

The "Engineering Association," together with the other engineering societies, 
publishes an engineering magazine called The K. S. A. C. Engineer. 



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iDepartment of Architecture anb JDrawing 



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The Course in Architecture at the Kansas State 
Agricultural College was organized in the spring of 1904 
to fill a long felt want among engineering students who 
intended to enter the building profession as draftsmen, 
master mechanics, building superintendents, contractors, 
or architects, there being at that time no schools of archi- 
tecture of any kind located between St. Louis and San 
Francisco. 

The Department has since that time graduated 
about fifty young men all of whom have found ready 
work in Kansas and the adjoining states. Several of 
the graduates have become teachers of architectural 
branches, descriptive geometry, drawing and manual 
training in colleges, high schools, and manual training 
schools. Others have become successful contractors. 
Still others have engaged in architectural practice for 
themselves in Kansas City, San Francisco, Chicago, Manhattan, Wichita, etc. One 
graduate has reached the distinction of having superintended the erection of the largest 
(at that time) "sky scraper" in the world, the so-called "Forty Two" in New York. 
Next fall the Department will add an additional professor to its Faculty, which at 
present consists of five members, an instructDr in farm architecture. 

The main class room of the Department is located on the second floor of the new 
wing of Engineering Hall and is well equipped with illustrative specimens of brick, terra 
cotta, building stone, architectural plaster casts, prints of representative buildings and 
historic monuments. It has a complete blue printing room and there is a growing 
library of several hundred volumes covering all branches of architecture. 




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I5V>e Department of .AppUeo 3Ttecl)anics 
an6 yUacijina "Design 




The Applied Mechanics and Machine Design de- 
partment gives instruction to all students of the Engin- 
eering Division, to those of other divisions who elect 
work in Mechanical or Concrete Construction, and to 
all students in the Mechanic Arts Course in the School 
of Agriculture. 

The work of the department is divided into the fol- 
lowing general divisions: 

(1) Class room instruction in the Mechanism of 
Machinery, Applied Mechanics, Strength of Materials, 
Hydraulics, Mechanical Drawing, and Machine Design. 

(2) Laboratory instruction in strength of Materials, 
Cement and Aggregate testing, Concrete Construction, 
Road Materials, testing, and Hydraulics, and 

(3) Drafting room practice in Mechanical Drawing, 
Graphical Analysis, and Machine Design. 

In the class room, students are taught to apply the principles of mathematics and 
mechanics to the solution of problems which arise in engineering work, particularly in 
the design of machines and structures. The study of Kinematics is designed to enable 
one to select the mechanism or combination of mechanisms best adapted to produce any 
desired transformation of motion or of power in machines. Applied Mechanics analyzes 
the forces which the elements of structures or machines are called upon to resist and de- 
termines the size and shape required in the different parts in order that they may do the 
work required of them. The application of the above matters to design of particular 
machines, and the selection of the materials best suited to particular uses, all with due 
regard to durability, cheapness of manufacture, and convenience in use, constitute the 
work in Machine Design. 

In Hydraulics a study is made of the mechanics of liquids at rest and in motion, and 
of machines for moving liquids or deriving power from them. 

In the Strength of Materials laboratory, various materials used in structures or ma- 
chines are tested to destruction in tension, compression, bending or torsion, the loads re- 
quired for this purpose being weighed and the phenomena attending the tests being noted. 
The purposes of the work are to give students a working familiarity with materials and 
their behavior under stress, as well as a working knowledge of methods of testing and 
making of reports. The latter purpose is kept in mind in all laboratory work of the 
department. 

In the Cement Laboratory, standard tests are made to determine the quality of ce- 
ments, sands, gravels and stones for use in concrete, and the effect of varying the propor- 
tions of properties of these materials, on the strength of concrete and mortars. 

In the Hydraulic Laboratory, various tests are made to determine the accuracy of 
different methods of measurement of water, and to determine the efficiency and other 
characteristics of pumping and water power machinery. 

In Concrete Construction, practical instruction is given in the selection and prep- 
aration of materials, making forms, and mixing, handling, placing and finishing concrete 
for foundations, side-walks, floors and the various other purposes for which this material 
is used. 

The drafting room is designed to teach students to read and interpret drawings, to 
make working drawings of machines, structures and other objects, so that these can be 
built from the drawings, to solve graphically the various problems most conveniently 
solved in this way, and to plan and develop the detailed design of machines on paper so 
the relation of the various parts may be clearly determined before the machines are built. 

The work of the drafting room and laboratory parallels the work of the class room 
in all the subjects taught in the Department. The underlying ideas in all of the instruc- 
tion are to teach fundamental principles, rather than unrelated facts, and to make the 
work of a highly practical character. 




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Civil anb 3figl)wav Cagineering 



The four year course in Civil Engineering was first 
introduced into the Kansas State Agricultural College 
in the fall of 1908. Beginning in the fall of 1914, the 
scope of the work in the Department of Civil Engineering 
was broadened so as to permit students to take optional 
courses especially adapted to those desiring to take up 
highway or irrigation and drainage engineering. 

It is the aim of the courses to equip the young men 
taking them, in the best possible manner, for entering 
upon the active practice of the profession of civil en- 
gineering, in one of its several branches. To accomplish 
this end, the student is required to take a large amount 
of cultural work and is given a thorough preparation in 
mathematics and those sciences having the most im- 
portant bearing on various branches of civil engineering 
work. Provision is also made for short courses in steam 
and gas engines and in electrical engineering. 

L. E. Conrad, M. S., is Professor of Civil and High- 
way Engineering. Mr. Conrad came to K. S. A. C. in 
September, 1908, from Lehigh University, where he had 
just spent two years doing post graduate work and as instructor in civil engineering. In 
addition to his teaching experience, Mr. Conrad has had the following practical 
experience: 

Chainman, Union Pacific Railroad, 1899; chainman, Illinois Central Railroad, 1900; 
levelman, Vicksburg National Military Park, 1900-1901; instrument-man, Mexican 
Central Railroad, 1902-1903; sewer construction, Centralia, 111., 1904; assistant engineer 
on terminal and harbor work, Gulf terminus of the Tehuantepec Route, Mexico, 1905- 
1906. 

W. S. Gearhart, B. S. in C. E., is Professor of Highway Engineering. Mr. Gearhart 
came to K. S. A. C. in September, 1909, as Highway Engineer, in the Extension Division. 
In 1911 he was made State Highway Engineer, and Professor of Highway Engineering 
in September, 1914. 

Before coming to Kansas, Mr. Gearhart had the following engineering experience: 

Chainman, United States Coal and Coke Company (West Virginia); transitman, 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company and Pere Marquette Railroad Company; Assistant 

Engineer, Chicago and Alton Railroad Company; Assistant State Highway Engineer, 

Illinois State Highway Commission. 

H. B. Walker, B. S. in C. E., is Associate Professor of Irrigation and Drainage 
Engineering, and Drainage Engineer in the Extension Division. It was in this latter 
capacity that he came to K. S. A. C. in September, 1910. Before coming to K. S. A. C, 
Mr. Walker did the following engineering work: 

Topographer, Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad, 1906-1907; draftsman, 
Great Northern Railroad Company, 1910; drainage engineer, Humboldt, Iowa, 1909- 
1910. 

F. F. Frazier, C. E., is Instructor in Civil Engineering. Mr. Frazier came to K. S. 
A. C. as assistant in Civil Engineering in September, 1911. In addition to his work in 
college he has had the following experiences as engineer: 

Assistant in engineering corps, Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton Railway, summer 
of 1909; inspector on concrete bridge work, ibid., 1910; assistant superintendent on ex- 
cavation and fill, with railroad contractors, 1910-1911; assistant engineer on construction, 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 1911. 

Students taking the civil and highway engineering courses have the use of the ex- 
tensive equipment owned by the other departments of the engineering division, and, in 
addition, the very complete surveying equipment of the civil engineering department. 
In addition to a "large supply of the ordinary surveying instruments, the department 
owns a seven inch repeating theodolite; an eight inch direction theodolite; a coast and 
Geodetic Survey precise level; and an invar base line tape, with stretchers, balance, etc. 
In the relatively short time that the department has existed, it has graduated sixty- 
two men, 85 per cent, of whom are engaged in some line of civil engineering work. 




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JDepartment of £lectrical Cttghteerinoi 





The Electrical Engineering Department at Kansas 
State Agricultural College was founded in 1900, with 
Professor B. F. Eyer as Professor of Physics and Elec- 
trical Engineering. 

In 1902, three men were graduated in the Electrical 
Engineering course, tho' their previous work did not 
cover all the studies prescribed. 

The 1903 graduates were the first who took the com- 
plete electrical engineering course, these were G. T. 
Fielding and 0. J. Reed. 

Since that time there has been a steady increase in 
the enrollment, the present senior class numbering 
fifteen and the junior class twenty-five. 

The Department has a variety of apparatus which 
is used for laboratory work. In the electrical measure- 
ments laboratory a complete line of alternating and di- 
rect current instruments is available while in the dynamo 
laboratory there are four A. C. generators, six A. C. 
induction motors of various types, ten D. C. machines 
which are used either as motors or generators, and one 
rotary converter. 
A mercury arc rectifier for automobile charging, three small rectifiers of various 
types, and a special set consisting of two D. C. motors and two A. C. generators of special 
construction are features of particular interest in the dynamo laboratory, while the 
notable instruments of the measurements laboratory are a reed type frequency meter 
and two precision watt meters of German make. 

A 110 volt and 32 volt storage battery are also available for experimental work. 
The present Head of the Department, Professor C. E. Reid, is a graduate of Purdue 
University, Class of 1902. After teaching one year at his Alma Mater, he spent two 
years in research at the Bureau of Standards, leaving government service to accept an 
assistant professorship at Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, O. In 1909 he 
was elected Professor of Electrical Engineering at Mississippi A. & M. College, which 
position he filled until the summer of 1914, when he came to Kansas State College. 

The other member of the Department, Mr. Grayson B. NcNair is also a Purdue 
graduate of the class of 1908. After four years in the employ of the Wagner Electric 
Mfg. Co. of St. Louis, he entered the Mathematics Department of K. S. A. C. where 
a man was wanted to teach mathematics from the engineer's viewpoint. However, a 
vacancy occurring in the Electrical Engineering Department, he was transferred to the 
latter Department where he has remained since. 

The Electrical Engineering Department gives instruction to all engineering students 
and also to the third year students in the School of Agriculture. In addition to this 
certain elective courses in electricity are offered to the students in the Division of 
Agriculture. About seventy-five students are taught in the Department each year. 

The Department of Electrical Engineering in addition to its instructional work also 
has charge of the entire electrical installation on the Campus, with the exception of that 
part which is found in the power house. 

The Electrical Engineering Department since it is a part of a State Institution is 
peculiarly fitted to act in an advisory capacity in cases where disinterested opinions are 
required in electrical matters, and is also equipped to make tests of meters in case of 
disputed accuracy, acceptance tests of plants and apparatus and other work requiring 
unbiased and expert services. 



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The building occupied by the Department of Shop 
Practice is the outgrowth of the original shop built in 
1876. The present floor area is somewhat in excess of 
26,000 square feet and has equipment and apparatus 
valued at nearly $40,000.00. New equipment and ap- 
paratus is being added to replace the worn out and ob- 
solete machinery as it is needed, so that the department 
can keep up with the rapid strides which are being made 
in the modern shops throughout the country. Thus 
instruction can be given in the latest methods of shop 
practice. 

The use of the manufactured products of the shop 
is constantly on the increase and will continue to increase 
since the wants of man are increasing at such rapid rates 
and can only be satisfied with the exact duplicate work 
as turned out by the modern interchangeable system of 
manufacture. This not only makes a better quality of machine but enables the owner 
to secure any missing or broken part, and with the assurance that it will fit exactly as it 
should in every case, and that at a lower net cost. A knowledge of the processes of man- 
ufacture and methods of repairing and adjusting machinery is highly important and ac- 
counts for the increased interest taken in Shop work. 

The work in the shops is so planned as to meet the needs of three classes of students: 
(1) Those in the course in Agriculture, the farmers short course, and in the short course 
in Engineering where the work is such that it will give the students a practical working 
knowledge of the tools and processes as will be most useful for the work on the farm or 
in the repair shop; (2) Those who are fitting themselves for positions as teachers of 
manual training and who must have a thorough training in the principles of shop work, 
and the materials used so that the proper instruction can be given to others; (3) Those 
in the engineering courses who require a thorough training in the principles of shop work 
as well as the more theoretical training in the various productive and administrative 
factors that the factory organizer, manager or shop superintendent has to deal with in 
connection with his work about the plant. 

Besides the regular shop exercises, the students are given practice in the repairing 
and adjusting of the various machines in the shops and laboratories. There are a num- 
ber of new machines in the process of construction for the shops and laboratories at all 
times which give good practice for the students and serve as a permans.it exhibit of tha 
work that the department is doing. Some of the machines already biilt ar;>: five 14- 
inch engine lathes, sixteen 10-inch wood lathes, one 14-inch shaper, one 20-inch double 
transverse shaper, one speed lathe, two 12-inch sensitive drill presses, one drill grinder, 
two disk grinders, one punch and shear, one molding machine, one belt dynamometer. 
one torsion testing machine, one 400-lb. steam hammer, besides numerous smaller ma- 
chines and various tools used by the shops and laboratories. 

In addition to this the shops have been doing practically all of the work for the other 
departments of the College. This work amounts to several thousand dollars per year, 
and gives employment to many needy students. 



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Steam anb <&as engineering 



THE Steam and Gas Engineering Department of the Kansas State Agricultural 
College gives instruction to the engineering students in the fundamental prin- 
ciples underlying designing, construction, selection, operation, and testing of 
steam power plant machinery, gas power plant machinery, compressed air, refrigeration, 
heating and ventilating, and the other applications of engineering thermodynamics. 

This department gives about one-eighth of the total credit hours in the Mechanical 
Engineering course; one-fiftieth in the Civil Engineering course; one-sixteenth in the 
Electrical Engineering course. In the Agricultural Engineering course the work of this 
department constitutes about one and three-tenths per cent, in the Irrigation and Drain- 
age option, about six and five-tenths per cent, in the Flour Milling option, and four and 
six-tenths per cent, in the Farm Machinery option. 

This department also gives instruction in farm motors, gas engines, traction engines, 
and steam engines and boilers to students who are not pursuing the professional en- 
gineering courses. 

The Steam Engineering laboratory contains ten different types of steam engines 
with various valve gears, different governors, and for different applications; a refriger- 
ating machine; steam pumps; steam traps; steam meters; steam calorimeters, gauges, 
injectors, and other small apparatus. The Gas Engineering laboratory has, at all times, 
fifteen or more types of engines, some belonging to the College, and some loaned by 
outside concerns. The traction engine laboratory has three different types of traction 
engines, one road roller, and as many different types of gas tractions as can be crowded 
into the present quarters. The various manufacturers of traction engines are only too 
willing to loan to the College all the traction engines the College can possibly take care 
of. The fuel and oil testing laboratories include several different kinds of coal calorime- 
ters, a gas calorimeter, two different types of pyrometers, viscosimeters, flashpoint testers, 
apparatus for analyzing chemical composition of fuel, meters, balances, etc. An auto- 
mobile laboratory is now being started, the companies loaning to the College various 
parts of automobiles for teaching purposes. 

The value of the equipment of this department is about $25,000.00. 



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Ol)e College of (Betteral Science 



"Delightful task! Oo rear the tender thought, 
Oo teach the voung ioea how to shoot, 
Oo pour the fresh instruction o'er the mino, 
Oo breathe the enlivening spirit and to fix 

ob,e generous purpose in the (Blowing breast." 

— James Thompson 




Dean J. T. Willard 

87 



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iDivision of (General Science 



THE Division of General Science includes nineteen departments of the College, 
some of which are the largest in the institution in respect to numbers of teachers 
and numbers of students taught. The Division includes all of the departments 
which give general educational training rather than technical instruction. They are 
those usually included in colleges of a general character, although the development and 
relative strength of these departments is determined by their relation to the specific 
functions of this College as a technical institution. Thus in the older type of college 
great attention is given to languages and, frequently, comparatively little to the physical 
and biological sciences. With us the reverse is true — the sciences are developed to such 
an extent as to constitute the dominant and characteristic features of the Division, 
while language work is extensive only in respect to English. German is also offered 
because of its general cultural value, and especially as a tool to the acquisition of the 
sciences. 

Mathematics and Physics occupy prominent positions in the College because of 
their relation to engineering subjects. The necessity for thorough fundamental training 
in Chemistry, Bacteriology, Botany, Zoology, and Entomology for those interested 
chiefly in Agriculture and Home Economics is such that work in nearly all of these sci- 
ences is required of all such students. 

The need of conscientious and capable action in political and social matters is prom- 
inent in a republic, and one of the highest duties of colleges is to give the necessary 
training in these fields. This is provided in our Departments of History and Civics, 
and Economics, and the Department of Education is a scarcely less important factor 
in such training and is indispensable for those expecting to become teachers. 

The continuance of the individual, and rational life of the more cultivated classes of 
people, require that along with intellectual, political and moral training there shall 
be ample attention to the preservation and development of the physical nature. Work- 
ing toward this end we have the Departments of Military Science and of Physical Edu- 
cation, in one or both of which students receive physical training of the highest value. 
The Departments of Public Speaking, the English Language, and Industrial Journalism 
impart to students capacity for expression of thought both orally and in writing — a power 
that is absolutely essential to one's highest usefulness, no matter in what lines the edu- 



88 



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Division of (Seneral Science — (tontinue6 




cation may have been given. The study of Music and English Literature, while con- 
tributing less directly to one's economic strength, is the means of providing capacity 
for enjoyment that is of the highest value, and without which, to many, life would be 
less inviting. Ability to draw upon the written treasures of history, science, philosophy, 
literature, etc., is conditioned largely upon one's power to find the material stored on 
library shelves, and all students are not only invited to make use of our splendid Library, 
but are given a course of instruction in its use. 

The Division of General Science thus presents the fields of knowledge and of dis- 
cipline that should put the student in possession of intellectual capital that will enable 
him to make the most of the special applications offered in the other divisions of the 
College, and in the vocational world. 





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Ol)c iDepartment of (Tfyemistr? 



THE Department of Chemistry is the largest department of the College in respect 
to the total number of its officers and the number of students taking work in it. 
There are in the department seventeen men in the teaching, investigational and 
executive force, and three women in the clerical force. About one thousand students 
are enrolled for work in the department each term, most of these having laboratory as 
well as class work. One-tenth of the total teaching work of the College is done in this 
department. 

Chemistry being one of the fundamental sciences, more or less knowledge of it is 
necessary for any student of the practical technical courses of the College. It is there- 
fore a required subject for every college student here, and also of students in the School 
of Agriculture. It is not required of short course students. The range of instruction 
extends from the simplest presentation of general, agricultural and household chemistry 
for students in the School of Agriculture, to research work involving questions of physio- 
logical chemistry and nutrition. One year of general chemistry is required of all stu- 
dents; organic chemistry, in addition, is required of all students in agriculture, general 
science and home economics; also a course in qualitative analysis. Agricultural students 
specialize still further through a study of agricultural chemistry and quantitative 
analysis especially in its application to agricultural problems, while students in home 
economics pursue a somewhat extended course in household chemistry. Certain groups 
of engineering students also have additional chemical instruction especially adapted to 
their requirements. 

For students desiring to give special attention to chemistry, advanced courses are 
offered in inorganic, industrial, organic, and physiological chemistry and several lines of 
quantitative analysis. The investigations constantly in progress in the Chemistry 
Department of the Agricultural Experiment Station and the Engineering Experiment 
Station afford opportunities for still further very valuable work for advanced students. 

Research work is constantly going on in the department covering several lines of 
especial importance in agriculture and other industries. Among these is a compre- 
hensive study of the pigments, oils, etc., used in painting, including investigation of the 
chemical changes that take place after the paint is applied. Experiments bearing upon 
animal nutrition are being conducted with chickens, pigeons, swine, horses, beef cattle, 
and dairy cows. Much of this work is in cooperation with other departments of the 
College. The chemistry of flour, especially as dependent upon the action of enzymes, is 
receiving a large amount of study, and the chemical changes which take place in the 
proteins of corn when it molds constitute an important field of investigation because of 
its relation to the disease known as "staggers" in horses. 

As time and means permit a representative of the department obtains samples from 
typical soils of the state. These are carefully analyzed and by this means a fund of 
information is being gradually accumulated concerning the elements upon which the 
soil fertility depends. 

The Department of Chemistry is also charged with important duties in connection 
with state laws. Hundreds of examinations of food are made annually under the pro- 
visions of the Food and Drugs Law, and hundreds of samples of dairy products are tested 
for the Dairy Commissioner in accordance with the law providing for that officer. The 
state law covering the sale of feeding stuffs and stock remedies also brings to this depart- 
ment hundreds of analyses of these articles, and the law touching the sale of commericial 
fertilizers makes it the duty of this department to inspect the fertilizers on sale in the 
state and to make analyses of inspection samples. 



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iDepartment of bacteriology 




The great strides made in preventive and curative 
medicine in the past have been due largely to the dis- 
coveries concerning the nature of bacteria and their 
methods of distribution and control. 

In the middle ages disease ravaged the earth to such 
an extent that civilization was practically extinct. Be- 
ginning with the discovery and use of antiseptics, vac- 
cines and antitoxins, surgery became a boon to mankind. 
The operating rooms in hospitals are built at the present 
time largely for the purpose of controlling the number of 
bacteria in the atmosphere during an operation. The 
death rate from diphtheria has been decreased 50% by the 
use of diphtheria antitoxin. Typhoid fever has been large- 
ly eliminated from the armies of the world; and with pro- 
per enforcement of sanitary measures and vaccination of 
all persons this disease could be eliminated from the entire 
country. Since the discovery of the tubercle bacillus by Koch the death rate from tuber- 
culosis has decreased over 50%! By the use of various antibacterial substances the length 
and frequency of disease has been greatly reduced and life has become much more en- 
joyable. The expectation of life has been increased fifteen years and may be increased 
another fifteen years by proper knowledge and application of the fundamental principles 
of bacteriology and preventive medicine. 

In regard to agriculture, the bacteriologist has aided in numerous ways. Most im- 
portant, perhaps, is in the production and preservation of food materials, in the produc- 
tion of milk and milk products, and by the use of bacteriological methods in establishing 
standards for refrigeration, pasteurization, and sterilization. 

In soil fertility work the bacteriologist has aided by explaining the manner in which 
bacteria render complex unavailable food available to the growing crop and by devising 
satisfactory methods for the inoculation of leguminous plants with the nitrogen fixing 
bacteria. 

Bacteriology has also aided the housewife in many household operations. The dis- 
coveries in the science of bacteriology have explained many of the difficulties formerly 
encountered in canning of fruit and vegetables and have pointed to ways by which they 
have been satisfactorily overcome. 

In this College, bacteriology is taught both as a biological science and as a practical 
factor in everyday life. In this subject only the simplest forms of life, consisting in- 
variably of one celled organisms, are studied. It is possible at the present time to study 
these microscopical forms with accuracy, thus paving the way for a more complete study 
and a better understanding of cells in the aggregate. The subject is also presented in 
its practical application to agronomy, medicine , domestic science, and sanitary 
engineering. 




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Ol)e department of Zoology 




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The practical subjects taught in the College, such as 
Engineering, Animal Husbandry/Agronomy, etc. .require 
foundational knowledge of mathematics, Chemistry, 
Zoology, Botany, etc. These foundational subjects are 
of value much further than as bases for the more imme- 
diately practical studies; they are disciplines. In fact, 
one almost always forgets the facts learned in school 
even from the most practical subjects. Therefore, if he 
does not get the power, or discipline, which will enable 
him to use his mind rightly either in ordinary matters, 
or in emergencies and exigences as they arise, he secures 
nothing from any studies, whether they be foundational 
or highly practical. 

The study of Zoology is one of the most practical 
and at the same time a true discipline. As one begins 
the study of the lower organisms through the microscope 
he has an entirely new and large world revealed and as he becomes more and more 
trained and interested the wonder of revelations increases apace. He realizes the 
relations of animals and plants to each other, and to the inorganic world, and sees him- 
self a part of all. From the largely esthetic standpoint alone the difference between 
having a fair knowledge of Zoology and being without it is comparable to walking 
along a path leading through a beautiful garden in the bright day time and on a 
dark night. 

While one is studying general Zoology, and after some progress, he should specialize 
in entomology, Animal Husbandry, Animal Breeding, or one of the medical professions, 
or continue research and teaching, as his inclination directs. Any of these will give 
ample opportunity for the best service to mankind, and will tend towards culture and 
happiness. 

The teaching work in Zoology in the Kansas State Agricultural College consists of 
elementary courses in general Zoology and Embryology which are taken by all, except 
engineering students, courses in parasitology, bird and mammal study (Economic Zo- 
ology), advanced general zoology, and advanced mammalian embryology, and cytology 
for those who desire to become teachers and research workers in zoology, veterinary 
medicine, animal husbandry, and animal breeding. The research is carried on in cytol- 
ogy (fundamental studies in inheritance), heredity, parasitology and mammals, and other 
zoological problems. 

The zoological seminar, two hours a week, consists of reports on progress in research 
by members of the staff and advanced students, and in reports on journals, lectures on 
evolution, and in a social good time. 



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Ol)£ ^Department of !ftotaTt? 





The work in the Department of Botany falls into 
two general sub-heads: (1) the work in the College, and 
(2) the work in the Experiment Station. 

The College work of the Department of Botany con- 
sists primarily in teaching the courses offered by the de- 
partment, thirteen in number, to the students, largely of 
the division of Agriculture, in which the courses in botany 
are required. The purposes of this teaching are three- 
fold: to give all students in agriculture especially, a good 
general knowledge of the life, functions, and nature of 
plants, and some notions of the evolution of the plant 
world; to prepare such students as may desire, for teach- 
ing botany in the high schools; to prepare men for ex- 
periment station or investigational work in three prin- 
cipal lines of botanical investigation, viz., (a) plant 
breeding, (6) plant pathology, (c) seed control work. At 
present, there are students who are taking advanced 
work in all three of these lines, in all of which there are 
excellent opportunities for capable, enterprising and in- 
telligent men, both in the United States Department 
of Agriculture and in the various agricultural colleges and experiment stations. 

The work of the Department of Botany in the Experiment Station is purely inves- 
tigational and experimental, and not commercial. This work is divided among four pro- 
jects as follows: (a) corn breeding investigations, (6) alfalfa breeding investigations, (c) 
cereal disease investigations, (d) physiological investigations on drouth resistance of agri- 
cultural plants. Of all these projects, the corn breeding project is the farthest along. As a 
result of hybridization work in 1910, we now have strains of corn that are apparently ex- 
tremely resistant to drouth, — certainly far more so than any other variety of corn in 
existence. The seed of these drouth resistant strains is being increased as rapidly as 
possible, and further tests in the western part of the state are being carried on. 

The alfalfa breeding project is being carried on to the same end, — the production of 
drouth resistant strains of alfalfa. A great deal of crossing has been done between some 
very hardy kinds of alfalfa from northern Siberia, very different from our northern alfalfas, 
and some very superior strains of pedigreed alfalfa we have produced here. The hybrids 
are being grown this year in the field for the first time. 

The investigations in the resistance of cereals to disease covers thus far, the resistance 
of wheat to rust, and of corn and sorghum to smut. The experiments are too extensive to 
be discussed in detail and have not yet reached a definite conclusion. A considerable num- 
ber of crosses have been made between our best local wheats and rust resistant spring 
wheats of Minnesota, from which we hope to get some strains of winter wheat that will be 
resistant to rust, and at the same time possess the good qualities of our winter wheats. 
The investigations on corn smut are at present closely concerned with discovering the 
chief means by which a corn field becomes inoculated with smut, and the disease thereby 
spread. In the production of smut-resistant sorghums, we have made a number of crosses 
between milo, which is absolutely resistant to both of the sorghum smuts, with a number 
of other sorghums, including feterita. The first generation of the hybrids was grown in the 
greenhouse this spring. When this seed is planted, it will be inoculated with smut spores, 
in order to test the resistance of the hybrid plants to smut. Only those that show com- 
plete smut-resistance will be saved. 

Members of the department participating in these various lines of investigation are 
as follows; In corn breeding, Prof. H. F. Roberts and H. T. Wilkie; in alfalfa breeding, 
Prof. H. F. Roberts and H. T. Wilkie; in cereal disease resistance, Prof. H. F. Roberts and 
L. E. Melchers; in drouth resistance investigations, Dr. E. C. Miller. 




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Ol)e JDepartment of Cntomolog? 

The work of the Department of Entomology cansists 
of instructional work in the College, investigational and 
insect control work in the Experiment Station, and the 
placing of needed information regarding insects before the 
people of our state. 

Instructional Work. — The Department of Entomolo- 
gy annually gives instruction to almost three hundred 
fifty students. Eighteen different courses, representing 
the various technical and practical aspects of the subject, 
are given. Instruction in general entomology, with special 
emphasis to the economic phases of the subject, is given to 
approximately ninety senior men from the Division of 
Agriculture. The relation of insects to agriculture is such 
a vital one that an intelligent understanding of some of 
the important general facts of insect life and the funda- 
mental principles of economic entomology is demanded 
if the farmer is to solve successfully any of the omni- 
present insect problems. Various economic courses, such 
as apiculture, economic entomology, horticultural ento- 
., , mology, and milling entomology are given in order that 

the students may have the preparation which will enable them to solve intelligently 
their future problems in the field. 

Instruction is given each year to about one hundred fifty junior and senior students 
from the Division of Home Economics. In this course the students are made acquainted 
with the relation of insects to urban and rural life. The relation of insects to disease is 
given a prominent place in this course. 

During the summer term instruction in entomology is offered to the public school 
teachers of the state. The work is designed to meet the needs of the teachers in high schools 
and training is given in the fundamentals of the science. 

Two courses— farm insects for the boys, and household insects for the girls— are 
given to the students in the School of Agriculture. 

The Department provides advanced courses in entomology for students who desire 
special training in the subject and who expect to do professional scientific work. Each year 
the Department turns out men, well trained in the technical aspects of entomology who 
are prepared to do active and efficient work in the state experiment stations in the United 
States Bureau of Entomology, or as instructors in colleges and high schools. The produc- 
tion oi men capable of solving the difficult problems of some field of human endeavor 
capable of extending human knowledge, and capable of disseminating the best things of 
human knowledge, constitutes one of the greatest contributions which an institution can 
make to a state. 

Investigational and Insects Control Work,— Insects cause a loss in Kansas each year of 
not less than forty million dollars. This is more than three times the amount that is spent 
each year, not only on the education of the boys and girls and young men and women in 
the state, including those in public schools, colleges, universities, and all private schools 
but also the upkeep of the buildings and the erection of new ones. It is twenty-five per 
cent, more than all the taxes collected annually in the state. The large per cent of this 
injury falls upon the farmer. He needs no argument to convince him that insects are 
causing him a heavy loss because they feed on his growing crops, stored products and 
domestic animals. Even his own health and comfort are affected by the various forms of 
these creatures; for instance, the house fly, which plays such a great part in the spreading 
of typhoid fever, and the malarial fever mosquito, which is the only disseminator of 
malarial fever. 

This enormous tax upon the farm crops of the state, amounting to more than forty 
millions would be much larger were it not for the careful investigations of the entomolo- 
gists of the College and Experiment Station. The methods of control resulting from the 
studies of these men, and put into operation by the farmers, assisted by the county farm 
agents and college extension men, have done much to check, lessen, and, in several cases 
almost eliminated the ravages of these insects 



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Hn6ustrial Journalism 




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Twenty-one hundred young men and women are 
now studying journalism in the forty American colleges 
and universities in which the subject is taught. This 
number, while small in proportion to the total of 35,000 
reporters and editors in the country, is decidedly en- 
couraging in view of the fact that professional instruc- 
tion in journalism has come to the front only within the 
last ten years. On the one hand, it is clear that there 
is no immediate danger of overcrowding the profession 
with specially trained men and women. On the other 
hand, the increasing number of students who are pur- 
suing journalism courses shows that such training is 
being highly valued. 

Even twenty years ago many newspapers looked 
with suspicion on the college graduate who applied for 
work. They seemed imbued with the spirit of Horace 
Greeley's assertion that "of all horned cattle the college man in a newspaper office is 
the greatest nuisance." The better newspapers to-day prefer college men and women 
and, among college men and women, give the preference to those who have taken 
courses in journalism. 

With the growth of commerce and industry as vital factors in American life, a de- 
mand had grown up for journalists who can write with authority on subjects included 
in these fields. This demand comes chiefly from large newspapers and from agricultural 
and trade publications. The last two classes mentioned comprise approximately 2,000 
papers in the United States. The country paper, moreover, is also beginning to seek 
men able to write effectively on the subject of agriculture, which is the great industry 
of the rural community. 

The Course in Industrial Journalism in the Kansas State Agricultural College pre- 
pares students for these lines of work. It is a four-year course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Industrial Journalism. In this are included the subjects funda- 
mental to general journalism, such as language, literature, natural science, and the social 
sciences. Each student is also expected to elect subjects relating to some line of industry 
as, for example, agriculture, engineering, home economics, or economic science. In 
order that he may acquire familiarity with the mechanical processes connected with 
publishing, the student is required to take, at least, two terms of printing. 

The specific work in journalism covers two years and includes a careful study of 
journalistic theory and practice, particularly as applied to industrial writing. The 
Kansas Industrialist, edited by the department, gives the students practical experience 
in reporting, copy reading, editorial writing, and other phases of journalism. Students 
are encouraged to write also for newspapers, farm papers, and other publications. 

Graduates of the course in Industrial Journalism are doing newspaper reporting, 
running country newspapers, and working on agricultural magazines. No student who 
had done efficient work while in college has found difficulty in securing a good position 
in practical journalism. 



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Ol)e JDepartment of Mtatyematics 





The science of mathematics should find a fruitful 
field of operation in an institution which like the Kansas 
State Agricultural College stands as an exponent of the 
industrial type of education. With this conviction as a 
spur to its endeavors, the Mathematical Department 
conducts its chief activities with two prime purposes in 
view. These may be briefly stated as follows: (a) the 
development of a stronger mental fiber through exercises 
requiring continuous and exact thinking; (b) the acquire- 
ment of facts, principles, and processes which are of 
indispensable aid in further scientific and technical study. 
The first aim makes an appeal to all classes of students; 
the second more especially to the engineer and to the 
student interested in advanced work in certain lines of 
science. 

Besides the regular routine work of class room in- 
struction the staff of the department either as a whole or as individuals has often been 
engaged in various special activities. For several years most of the members met for an 
hour weekly for a discussion of the results of study along some line of mathematical 
development. These meetings were a source of much profit to the participants. After 
a time it was felt that the department could render a greater service to the college by 
enlarging its club organization so as to include members of its own student body and by 
broadening the scope of its work in such a way as to appeal to the interest of the larger 
constituency. Finally during the present year the plan of having in conjunction with 
the members of the department staff a frequent student participation in the bi-weekly 
programs has been put into successful operation. One important result of this club 
activity has been to open up to the mind of the student a clearer vision of the larger 
function of mathematics in the affairs of men than is possible by the usual methods of 
classroom instruction. 

Another project which has been and is being prosecuted by joint committees from 
the department force and from the faculty of engineering is that of closer correlation of 
the courses in mathematics with the later applied technical subjects. The various 
branches of pure mathematics from elementary algebra to calculus are under consider- 
ation and it is believed that a syllabus of the results obtained from this cooperative effort 
involving different points of view will prove to be of much advantage in future instruction. 
The Department, while thoroughly believing in the importance of its own special work 
as a part of the educational curriculum is keenly conscious of the justice of the modern 
demand for "humanizing" instruction so as to make wherever possible a vital contact 
with life itself. 




101 



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iVpartment of CitgUsl) Canguage 




To provide each student with the kind of training 
which best fits him to do his life work, is the aim of the 
Department of the English Language. With ten mem- 
bers on the faculty and with an annual enrollment of 
more than three thousand students, the Department 
carries a heavy load of instruction, conferences, and 
theme corrections. In addition, every member of the 
faculty carries on some line of public service work in 
connection with one or more of the following depart- 
ment bureaus: 




1. Debating Bureau 

2. Editing Bureau 

3. Literary Society Bureau 

4. Bureau of Correspondence Courses 

5. Bureau of Secondary English 

6. Bureau of Elementary English 

7. Bureau of Courses of Study 

8. Bureau of Farm and Technical Advertising 

9. Bureau of Literary Service 
10. Public Service Bureau 



The Department is seeking not only to do well the instruction work of the College, 
but also to extend its influence to the citizens of Kansas who seek or need the help 
it can give. 



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102 



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iDepartment of HEngUsl) Citerature 




When Dr. C. M. Brink became Professor of English 
in the summer of 1902, the two branches of the English 
work were conducted in one Department. Besides the 
head of the Department, there were only two teachers 
who gave their entire time to instruction in English 
studies. Miss Alice Rupp, who had been connected 
with the College for many years, was the efficient and 
brilliant Assistant Professor and Miss Ada Rice, a gradu- 
ate of the College, was an assistant in the department. 
Miss Rupp afterward resigned and was married. 
Miss Rice is still teaching in the College. 

The Department grew and prospered until, in 1911, 
on Dr. Brink's recommendation the English work was 
divided into two departments — Professor Brink choosing 
the Department of English Literature for himself. 

Beyond imparting to its students a just and exact 
conception of the nature of literature in its various forms and a reasonable knowledge of 
some of the great masterpieces of our speech, this Department aims to cultivate a liking 
for literature. Thus it seeks to enrich the mind not only by imparting information but 
by kindling inspiration. It also furnishes the very best method outside of the study of 
the ancient classics of learning how to write and speak the English Language. By 
bringing students into contact and familiarity with the writings of the experts in the use 
of speech of all the centuries, it gives the cream of the thought and the style of the past. 
This suggests the advantage of the great literature of the world over ephemeral writings, 
because it has been found worthy to live not only for the value of its thought, but because 
of the beauty of the language in which that thought is embalmed. Literature is an 
artistic expression of life, — consequently it cultivates in the reader an insight into life, 
an appreciation of the beautiful in art and nature, develops a sense of love for the good 
and true, sets high standards of patriotism, of devotion to every good cause; in short, a 
knowledge and appreciation of good literature quickens social sympathy, desire for the 
highest service and broadness of view. By thus adding to one's resources, it multiplies 
the possibilities of enjoying life and adds immeasurably to its happiness. It makes of 
our graduates both better citizens and better, wiser, more capable, happier men and 



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103 



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Department of Cconomics 





The present Department of Economics was organ- 
ized in June, 1904, and placed under the direction of 
Professor J. E. Kammeyer. At that time the work con- 
sisted of but one course in general economics running 
through one term of the college year. At various times 
since that date the work has been expanded until now 
it includes the following courses: elementary economics, 
business organization, labor problems, money and bank- 
ing, public finance, co-operation and farm markets, 
sociology, and rural sociology. In January, 1914, Pro- 
fessor E. D. Baker was added to the teaching force of the 
department. 

Although this department is an integral part of the 
Division of General Science, it gives instruction in every 
one of the academic courses of the college, and the school 
of agriculture, and the summer school. This diffusion of 
the work is a recognition of its importance as a part of 
the training every college student should have, no mat- 
ter what special preparation he may be seeking. The 
farmer, tradesman, engineer, mechanic, housewife, all 
need the information which a study of economic science gives. It not only broadens him 
educationally but fits him specifically for better citizenship. Familiarity with the funda- 
mentals of this science, and intelligent interest in the problems of labor, money, banking, 
taxation, business organization, social betterment, and a multitude of other problems of 
like character are absolutely essential to correct thinking on such subjects, and to a safe 
vote. The man or woman who does not understand the economic phenomena which are 
a part of his daily life, and who is out of sympathy and out of touch with the economic 
progress of his time is not only a handicap to himself but also a menace to democratic 
institutions. 

While training for citizenship may be considered the dominant purpose of the courses 
offered in this department, it is not the only object in view. The student of engineering 
must, of course, be well grounded in mathematics and the technical subjects of his course, 
but he should also have at least a general knowledge of partnership and corporate forms 
of business organization, stocks and bonds, cost accounting, administrative methods, 
methods of routing, buying, advertising, and selling. Such information supplements and 
re-enforces his training as an engineer, promotes his chances for success, and enlarges 
the field of his opportunities and possibilities. Such course as business organization, 
labor problems, banking, are designed for his special benefit. 

In like manner the farmer, tradesman, or dairyman needs training in the application 
of economic principles to his particular business. Marketing, co-operation, rural credits, 
crop selection, rents, farm labor, and similar topics should be of interest to him for they 
are as fundamentally essential to his success as any distinctly technical subject in his 
course. Rural economics and sociology, co-operation and farm markets are designed to 
meet his needs. 

As the teaching force of the department is enlarged more time will be available to 
extend the research work that should be done. A beginning in this direction has been 
made this year by Assistant Professor E. D. Baker, who is making an investigation of 
wheat marketing in Kansas. The results of his studies in this field will be published for 
the benefit of the farmers of the state. 



(Q) S\}ft^^l^JLyz&4/^ 



104 



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Ol)e department of Hfistor? an.6 (Tivics 



The Department of History and Civics fully appre- 
ciates the fact that the training of young citizens for the 
duties of active citizenship should be an essential part of 
the work in any public school, and especially in every 
educational institution supported by State and Nation. 
Moreover, history should teach us to understand not 
only the long story of human progress, but also the en- 
vironment in the midst of which we live, and to appre- 
ciate the institutions of which we are a part. History 
and civics together teach us that human institutions are 
in a constant state of change, and that it is our duty as 
good citizens to guide these changes in the direction that 
will improve these human institutions. In a technical 
school, perhaps more than elsewhere, we appreciate the 
fact that we are living in an age dominated as never be- 
fore by industrial institutions, industrial activities, and 
the industrial spirit; hence, in all of our courses we give 
special attention to this phase of history and government. 

There are now five teachers in the department of 
history and civics, who devote all of their time to this work. Professor Ralph R. Price, 
who is completing his twelfth year at the head of this department, received his educational 
training at Baker University, the University of Kansas, the University of Chicago, the 
University of Wisconsin, Cornell University and the University of Michigan. Assistant 
Professor Raymond G. Taylor has been teaching here for five years, having received his 
educational training at the University of Kansas and the University of Chicago. Assist- 
ant Professor I. Victor lies came to the Kansas State Agricultural College in the fall of 
1911, having received his previous training at the East Illinois State Normal School, the 
University of Kansas, the University of Colorado, the University of Wisconsin, Prince- 
ton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University. Instructor Elden 
V. James has been teaching in the Agricultural College for three years. His previous 
training was received at Marietta College, West Virginia Wesleyan College, and the 
University of Michigan. Miss Jessie A. Reynolds, Instructor in History and Civics, has 
been a teacher here since the fall of 1906. She is a graduate of the College, as well as of 
the University of Kansas. She has done graduate work at the University of Kansas and 
at the University of Chicago. In addition to this, she has spent two summers in travel 
study in Europe. 

As to the courses now offered by the department, there are several that stand out 
with some prominence. The courses known as American History I and II are taught by 
Professor Price, and represent his best educational work. The first course covers the 
founding of a self-governing nation in the new world, including motives and methods. 
The second course is devoted chiefly to a study of slavery and the modern industrial 
expansion of America. Other courses taught chiefly by Professor Price are a Teachers' 
Course in History, and a course on Immigration and International Peace. The course 
to which Assistant Professor Taylor gives most of his time is called Advanced Industrial 
History. In this course he covers in a single term the whole period of American history, 
chiefly with respect to the industrial life of the people. Other courses taught chiefly by 
Mr. Taylor are European Industrial History, an advanced course in English History, 
Kansas History, Business Law, and International Law. Assistant Professor lies gives 
most of his time to an advanced course in the actual workings of our American govern- 
ment and politics. Other courses taught by Mr. lies are French History, with special 
reference to medieval institutions, and a course in modern Europe, including European 
governments and international relations. A new course in current history, elected by 
about sixty students this spring term, will become a required course in certain divisions 
with the opening of the next College year. This course in a special manner connects the 
past with the present, and guides to correct reading of that which is most worth while in 
the newspapers and magazines of the day. In the School of Agriculture, Instructors 
James and Reynolds give courses in European and American History, civics, and indus- 
trial history similar to the courses offered in the College except that they are more ele- 
mentary. Here as in the college courses, the industrial and practical phases of history 
and government are stressed. „ 




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iDepartmettt of Jpl)?sics 





Since the erection of the Physical Science Hall, the 
Department of Physics has occupied the west wing of 
that building, but large as the building is, these quarters 
are inadequate to provide for the number of students that 
take some of the many courses offered by the Department. 

When the Department moved into its present lo- 
cation in 1902, it had only two instructors; the average 
term of enrollment of students being 161. During the 
past year there has been an average term enrollment of 
821 students, and six instructors in the Department. 

Besides the usual courses in Physics offered in most 
colleges, courses in Photography, Instrument Building, 
Radiant Energy, and other special courses are given as 
electives. 

The Department was the first to introduce House- 
hold Physics for Home Economic Students, a course 
which has since been introduced into many colleges 
teaching Domestic Science. This course takes the place 
of the usual required course in College Physics, dealing 
with the physical problems of the home, including heat- 
ing, light, ventilation, and electrical equipment. 

The Department has charge of the College Weather Station; and has in its possession 
the oldest continuous weather records for the State of Kansas, extending in an unbroken 
record back to 1858. Any questions regarding Kansas climate, rainfall, data, or other 
information valuable to farmers are referred to this Department for answer. 

A new wireless equipment has just been installed, for the use of the class in Radiant 
Energy. Wireless Corps of the Military Department have been using the equipment 
in their signal work. 

Some time is found for research work, and some investigations of commercial value 
are under way or have been completed. The renewal of sulphate storage cells; the study 
of insulators, and heat insulation; the light of the firefly, and the effects of different 
colors of light on plant growth, are the questions of particular interest that are being 
investigated. 

As a number of our students accept positions for teaching physics, summer courses 
adapted to the needs of such students are given. 

J. O. Hamilton, Head of the Department, came to Kansas State College fourteen 
years ago, and has been in the Department ever since. Assistant Professor Raburn 
has been with the Department for the past five years. Assistant Professor Floyd has 
been connected with the Department for four years. Instructors Allee and Blair have 
been added to the teaching force more recently. 

Some needed changes in the arrangements of rooms and equipment will be made 
during the summer quarter. The Department will make every effort to adjust itself to 
its present quarters. 



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Ol)e department of (Berman 





The Department of German was founded eleven 
years ago. Previous to that time classes in German and 
in French were taught now and then by this or that 
instructor, but with the spring of 1904 the work was 
strengthened to such an extent that it was put in charge 
of a department head. 

German is now required only in the Division of 
Home Economics. It is elected, however, by many 
students in other divisions, as it is considered indispen- 
sible for those who expect to continue their work as in- 
vestigators or to become teachers in those lines of work 
where use may be made of the vast stores of knowledge 
collected by German scientists. Others elect the work 
because they desire to get a better understanding of their 
own language through the study of another, or because 
they wish to become acquainted with treasures of 
German literature. Still others feel that the acquisition 
of a practical knowledge of German will not only afford 
them excellent mental training but also will put them 
in an advantageous position in dealing with their 
German speaking neighbors. 

Methods of modern language instruction are very different. Some instructors be- 
lieve in using the methods employed in teaching ancient languages in the days of our 
fathers, — stiff grammar training, with the language mill grinding slow but grinding ex- 
ceeding fine. Others would disregard grammar in modern language instruction and rely 
upon conversation wholly. In the Department here an endeavor is made to adhere to a 
middle-of-the-road policy. Grammar is taught with some thoroughness; reading aloud 
is required in class, and constant improvement in the pronunciation of German words 
is striven for; German passages are translated and translation into good, idiomatic 
English is insisted on; conversation is a part of the work, especially in the elementary 
courses, thus making the vocabulary active and usable and training the student in prompt 
thinking and in natural expression; written work is regularly employed in the lower 
courses, thus making for accuracy; and live subject matter is employed, thus making for 
interest and enthusiasm, hence for best results in the acquisition of this living language. 

The chief aim of the Department is to teach the German language. The studying 
of German literature is only a secondary consideration here. The reason for thus placing 
the stress is that, as this is an institution training for practical life, it is felt that the courses 
should be largely practical. German customs, manners, and institutions are studied. 
In addition, however, German classics find a place in the course. 

The Department has a number of valuable adjuncts in its instructional work. 
The Deutscher Verein Teutonia meets twice a month during the College year. Here 
training is had in the informal as well as in the formal use of German, in conversation, 
in singing German songs, etc. Membership is open to all students who have had two or 
more terms of College German or who have had at least a year of German in the high 
school. The dues are nominal and the work is very helpful. Students may secure valuable 
training also in the use of the German papers and magazines on file in the College library. 
The most important of these are Die Woche and Fliegende Blaetter, both published in 
Germany. A third incentive toward the development of the German work is the use 
of German texts in advanced courses of certain of the departments of instruction in the 
College. 




107 



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Ol)e JDepartmeixt of £6ucatiott 



The csurses in the Department of Education have 
far their controlling purpose the professional training 
of teachers. Tw3 classes of coursas are offered: (1) 
Courses that give the broad fundamental principles 
upon which education is based, and (2) courses that 
function in technique and skill in school management 
and organization of the subject matter of the curriculum. 
All courses are based on the proposition that education 
supported by public taxation should function in social 
and vocational efficiency. The Department offers 
courses in general psychology, social psychology, his- 
tory of education, principles of education, educational 
psychology, educational administration, methods of instruction, rural education, 
agricultural education, industrial education, home economics education, vocational 
guidance and practice teaching. 

Graduates of the College who have taken twenty-four hours in the Department of 
Education are granted a state life teachers' certificate by the state board of education. 

The School of Agriculture is in the department of education and is used for practice 
teaching. 





108 



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Ol)e Cibrar? 





The Library had its origin in 1858 with the founding 
of Bluemont Central College. In 1863, when the 
college was taken over by the state, the library consisted 
of a few hundred books, mostly old Greek and Latin 
classics, religious monographs, sermons, etc., which had 
been solicited in the eastern states by President Dennison 
and other founders of the college. In 1867, Mr. J. H. 
Lee, Professor of Latin and Greek Languages and Litera- 
ture, was appointed as the first librarian. From its 
beginning the growth has been slow but steady. In 
1878 it contained about 2,000 volumes; in 1884, 5,740 
volumes; in 1897, 16,000 volumes. To-day there are 
about 49,000 volumes available for use besides a large 
collection of unbound material and pamphlets. A large 
share of this material has been secured by gift. During 
the full period of its existence, about 57 years, it has re- 
ceived but .$42,599.00 in state appropriations to be de- 
voted to purchase of books and magazines. This is less 
than the amount spent by some institutional libraries 
in a single year for book purchase. The present library 
building was erected in 1894 and for a long time has been inadequate both as to space 
for readers and storage capacity for books. A modern fireproof building should be 
provided in the near future. 

The library contains about 49,000 bound volumes and many thousand pamphlets. 
It receives regularly about 400 serial publications. It is a depositary for all United 
States Government publications. It receives the publications of many of the great 
scientific and educational societies and institutions, noticeably of the Carnegie Institu- 
tion of Washington which is only sent to the leading universities and colleges of the 
country. 

Three reading rooms are maintained in the central building; the main reference 
room containing dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, handbooks and the bound files of 
magazines and serial publications as well as daily papers and local county papers of Kan- 
sas; and the room for special reserve books used in connection with class work. These 
rooms are opened freely to all students and the public in general as also is the stack 
room where the main collection of books is stored. The library is open for use every day 
in the year except holidays and Sundays. During term time it is also open evenings. 

The library aims to be of distinct use to every member of the college community. 
It should supply information for every teacher; it should be a storehouse of knowledge 
for every student; it should contain the latest results of experimentation and research 
the world over for the use of the investigator; it should form the center of cultural growth 
for the whole institution; it should serve, up to the limits of its capacity and scope, all 
the people of Kansas both through lending books and by giving information; it should 
become a vital factor in the large movement for better rural conditions throughout 
the state by stimulating the establishment of social center libraries. To perform these 
functions satisfactorily, the library needs the help and cooperation of all. The library 
aims to have in every department of its work trained and competent assistants who are 
able and anxious to be of the utmost service to all users of the library. 




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^ttiUtar? department 

In 1862, during a period of national strife 
and danger, Congress passed and President 
Abraham Lincoln signed on July 2, an act 
entitled the Morrill Act. This was the first 
of a series of appropriation Acts giving 
moneys to specified schools throughout the 
country for certain purposes, among which 
was that of instruction in military tactics. 
The first Morrill Act donated to each state 
30,000 acres of land for each senator and 
representative to which the state was at that 
time entitled and this, together with subse- 
quent acts has brought the grand total up 
to approximately $115,000.00 received by 
the college every year from the federal 
government. Manifestly this reduces the 
cost of education very materially to each 
individual student. 

Since the Morrill Act, which established 
the precedent of making appropriations for 
schools, was passed during |the time of our 
great Civil War and when the country was 
realizing more than ever before the need of 
men trained in arms for defense of their 
country and when that country was resort- 
ing to every means possible to obtain de- 
fenders for the nation it is rather natural to 
come to the conclusion that one of the main objects in the minds of our legislatures, if 
not the main one, was to provide a means whereby a large number of young men of the 
country could receive instruction in military tactics, so that in case of future wars there 
would be a body of men scattered throughout the country from whom the National 
Government could select men as company officers of infantry and volunteers. 

During the past few years, the War Department, having begun to appre- 
ciate more than ever the need for the proper development and education of all college 
students along lines of National Defense, has been paying considerable more attention to 
colleges having Military Departments than heretofore, hence this department, while al- 
ways an important one, has grown to be the largest single department in the college and 
such a high standard of efficiency has been reached that the War Department has seen fit 
to place this school in the list of Distinguished Colleges of the United States. This means 
that of all the colleges in this class we rank among the ten best. 

One of the big main objects of this Department is to eliminate and dispel as far as 
possible the inherent, but unfounded fear, existing among the American people of a stand- 
ing army or so-called "Militarism." Like a large mass of information possessed by the 
great majority of the people of the country, the information in regard to the needs of an 
Army and Navy, the cost of same, and the many problems of National Defense, is prac- 
tically a matter of hearsay rather than one of actual facts. 

This Department if properly handled and properly encouraged, will undoubtedly be- 
come one of the strongest, if not the strongest single factor for the development of all that 
is good in college life and for the highest things that college men should stand for because 
of the fact that all men enter the Department when they first enter college and because 
their work and the standard set for them here are the ones which make the first, greatest 
and probably the most permanent impression upon them. The standards of a soldier are 
those of the highest and the standard of all college men should be just as high, hence it is 
the aim of this department to establish such high ideals of honesty, truthfulness, con- 
scientiousness, uprightness, and honor among the men while in this department that it will 
be a foundation upon which to build for the whole college and every individual in the col- 
lege so that each and every one will come under that all-inclusive phrase, "Conduct be- 
coming an officer and a gentleman" and that all acts may be ruled and guided by this ideal. 



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public Speaking 




The Public Speaking Department embraces all of 
forensic and histrionic endeavor — debating, oratory, 
dramatics, speaking, oral reading, and voice culture. 
Classes are held in the morning and rehearsals in the 
afternoon. 

The chief aim of the department is to get students 
to speak and read with expression. Good enunciation 
and pronunciation are therefore insisted upon, not only 
in the formal speeches made before the class, but in the 
ordinary conduct of the recitation. In the Extempore 
Speech classes the object is to get the student to treat 
technical subjects in a manner intelligible to the average 
layman. Every technical student should realize that 
most avenues of promotion are open to him who can 
either talk or write about subjects pertaining to his pro- 
fession. He who cannot do this must stay within the 
rut of daily routine without hopes of advancement. 

To insist upon clearness of expression is no small 
task, for the habit of careless speech and high-pitched, 
strident tones is typically American. There is an entire 
neglect in developing the speaking voice in clarity of diction and musical quality. 

Several reasons have been assigned for this neglect and consequent decay in our 
manner of speech. Some put the blame on the elementary schools and say that here in 
the most impressionable and plastic period of the child's life, correct habits of speech 
should be inculcated. Others say that our speech is defective because we have no na- 
tional academy such as the French have to act as an authority in the matter, but have to 
rely mainly upon the varying efficiency of our best writers, speakers, and actors. Again, 
the fact that reading aloud has not the place it once had in the curriculum of our schools 
and in the home is given as another reason. The family reading circle is a thing of the 
past in most places. Today with our ever increasing horde of books and improved 
system of lighting, the family reading lamp has been banished and every member of the 
family has his own special reading matter just as he has his own bread and butter plate 
and napkin ring. Someone has said, "Set almost anyone to reading aloud and mark the 
degraded wretchedness of his utterance. Keep him at it and mark the inevitable im- 
provement in his speech." Good reading underlies good speaking. If one reads with 
expression, the chances are that he will speak in the same way provided he has the subject 
matter. We pay a heavy price for our silent reading because through it we miss much ot 
the beauty and form of literature and language. 

We see then why it is that we say bo-kay for bouquet, Agri-cul-choor for agriculture, 
and individ-jool for individual, etc., and why we carelessly insist upon saying I yam, 
don't chew think so, gimme my hat, git red of, notchett, etc., etc. 

The College Dramatic Club is a student organization coming within the scope of 
work done in this department. It has a membership of fifty and includes students in all 
college courses. Meetings are held once a month at which two one-act plays are given. 
An annual play caps the climax of the year's work. " Facing the Music " by Henry 
Darnley and once starred in by Henry E. Dixie was the vehicle used March first, when it 
was given before a large and enthusiastic audience in the College Auditorium. 

The rural theatre is a project held in anticipation for next year. The idea is to coach 
the students to direct plays to such an extent that when they enter smaller communities 
as teachers or otherwise they will be able to do that sort of work there with the idea of 
arousing community and social interest and leadership — something that is needed very 
much today in rural communities. 




113 




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"department of ;pbr 5l cal £6ucation 





The Department of Physical Education in this Col- 
lege has its justification in the fact that it offers oppor- 
tunity for healthful recreation and participation in regular 
and systematic physical exercises conducive to the devel- 
opment of organic vigor. It is being recognized more clear- 
ly every day that modern education must take account of 
the various factors affecting the health of the individual. 
Institutions are under a serious obligation to make the en- 
vironment of the student safe, sanitary, and healthful. 
The faculty of this institution appreciates the beneficial 
results derived from regular and systematic exercise and 
have recommended that two years of physical work be re- 
quired for women in both the School of Agriculture and in 
the College; and that one year of physical training for men 
be required in the School of Agriculture and elective in 
the College for credit. 

To show further the appreciation of the faculty 
toward this particular phase of work, it might be noted 
here that physical training may be elected for credit to 
the amount of six units above the requirement. 

The following phases of work are combined for car- 
rying out the Department aims: First, a physical exami- 
nation is required of all entering students, and work in 
the Department is then assigned according to the needs, 
tastes, and capacities. Second, Hygienic Instruction. This instruction aims to give an 
insight into the practical problems of daily, helpful living. Directions will be given for 
avoiding the common ills of student life, and for maintaining the highest degree of 
physical and mental condition while in college. Third, Instruction in Physical Exercise. 
This course furnishes instruction in all the various gymnastic and athletic exercises, 
namely, gymnastic, free hand, light hand apparatus, heavy apparatus, athletics, plays, 
and games. Fourth, Inter-Class and Inter-Collegiate activities in all phases of athletic 
sports. The department is the best equipped in the Middle West to offer opportunity 
for physical exercise, plays, and games; having one of the largest and finest gymnasiums 
in this section; and a large athletic field. The men's gymnasium has an exercising floor 
132 feet in length and 80 feet in width, equipped with the latest gymnastic apparatus. 
There is also a cork linoleum running track in the gallery sixteen laps to the mile; a swim- 
ming pool and shower baths in the locker rooms. The opportunity for work in the 
women's department is as great as that for the men. There is a fair sized exercising 
room for the women, equipped with apparatus; a swimming pool in the locker room; 
showers and lockers; an opportunity for tennis, field hockey and other outdoor sports. 
The policy for the Department is the greatest good for the greatest number. 
During the present term in the Men's Department there are 365 students regularly 
enrolled for developmental work offered under gymnastics and systematic exercise. In 
addition to this there are 255 men taking daily track work and baseball, also 26 men in 
class work in boxing and about the same number in wrestling. For the present term in 
the Women's Department there are not less than 595 women taking regular and system- 
atic work, which shows a total of 1267 students of the College engaged in healthful and 
systematic physical activities during the present term. 

The School has been a member of the Missouri Valley Conference in Athletics for the 
last two years, and maintains a schedule with all the leading teams of the Conference. We 
have made a creditable standing in this higher competition, especially in basket-ball, track 
and baseball, and we are hopeful that with additional help in the Department, that foot- 
ball may be equally successful. 

The greatest need of the Department at the present time is a larger teaching staff, and 
additional play fields for both men and women, in order that every student in the Insti- 
tution may have the opportunity to engage in some phase of healthful recreative exer- 
cise adapted to the needs, tastes, and capacities of the individuals. 



114 



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Ol)e ^Department of Mtusic 




Music in the Kansas State Agricultural College is 
offered to her students free of charge, a privilege of which 
no other institution can boast. Under Professor Olof 
Valley, the Director of Music, the Music Department 
has made rapid progress. Professor Valley, realizing that 
music is becoming one of the strongest factors in the 
progressive social life of rural communities, has had as 
his aim the training which will enable the students to 
make use of their music in their homes and in their social 
life rather than the training of them for professional work 
in music. 

The different musical organizations and the excellent 
programs which they present, testify to the efficient work 
done by the Department. The Choral Society, Orches- 
tra, Band and Glee Club give annual concerts and the 
entire department gives several recitals during the college year. The following program 
was given at the last annual concert by the orchestra, under the direction of Professor 
R. H. Brown. 




Selection from "Aida" 

Symphony No. 6 (Pathetique) B Minor Op. 74. 

Concerto for Pianoforte, No. 1, Op. 23 

"The Lady of the Slipper" ... 

(o) "Valse Triste" Op. 44 



Verdi 

Tschaikowsky 
Tschaikowsky 

Herbert 

.Sibelius 



(6) "Marche Militaire" Shubert 

"Lohengrin" Wagner 

At the Glee Club concert given last March, this program was given: 

I Wish to Tune My Quivering Lyre Spross 

On the Road to Mandalay ^Speaks 

If You Would Love Me McDermid 

Ashes of Roses Hawley 

In a Persian Garden .... Liza Lehmann 

(a) Mammy's Lullaby Spross 

(6) Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog Hammond 

A Dream of Arcady DeKoven 

Just a Wearyin' for You Carrie Jacobs Bond 

When Mabel Sings Speaks 

The feature of the year, however, is the opera given in the spring under the direction 
of Professor Olof Valley. "The Pirates of Penzance" will be given this year, and from 
the comments already heard it will be a fine presentation of the opera. It is Professor 
Valley's ambition to install a Pipe Organ in the Auditorium at some future date, and with 
this aim in view two years ago he started a Pipe Organ fund to which the proceeds of all 
the concerts have been added since then. The reports show the sum total of the net pro- 
ceeds to be nearly $800. With the proceeds from the Pirates of Penzance it is hoped to 
raise the sum to the four figure mark. After the sum has increased somewhat it is to be 
hoped that an appropriation or an endowment can be obtained which will ensure the 
success of the movement at some early date. 



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0[)d (Tollege of Hfome Cconomics 



"~$av ani> wide m? power extends." 



— Arnold 




Dean Mary P. Van Zile 




117 



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^Division of Hfome Ccoaomics 




HOME Economics stands for the ideal home life of today unhampered 
by the traditions of the past; the utilization of all resources of 
modern science to improve home life; the freedom of the home 
from the dominance of things and their subordination to ideals; the sim- 
plicity in the material surroundings which will most free the spirit for the 
more important interests of the home and of society." — Ellen Richards. 

Home Economics as a distinctive subject of instruction treats of the economic, 
sanitary and aesthetic aspects of food, clothing and shelter including their selection, 
preparation, and use by the family or by larger groups of people. At the Kansas State 
Agricultural College the importance of home economics as a part of a general and ade- 
quate scheme of college education for women has been recognized since 1873, and by 
earnest and sympathetic study of the problems involved, courses have been formulated 
that are designed to fit young women to be home makers and capable women in what- 
ever sphere their life work may be. 

In accordance with the best judgment of the recognized national leaders of the 
home economics movement, the work of the Division of Home Economics at the Kan- 
sas State Agricultural College is organized into four subdivisions, viz., Food, Clothing, 
Shelter, and Household Management. The responsibility for the courses in Foods 
and largely for the courses in Shelter and Home Management is centered in the Do- 
mestic Science department. Twelve trained women constitute the Domestic Science 
department faculty. The courses in Clothing are taught by the faculty of ten women 
which constitutes the Domestic Art department. The courses in Color and Design 
and Home Decoration are taught by the two young women of the Home Art depart- 
ment. The Extension work in Home Economics includes the several phases of the 
work and is carried on by six young women who are members of the Extension Division. 

Since instruction in home economics is based on laws of the physical, biological, 
and sociological sciences, a knowledge of these is essential. These basal subjects are 
given in the several departments of the College. This arrangement makes it possible 
to present science, applied science and practice in their proper relation. To the end 
that well rounde'd culture may be attained courses in English, literature, history, etc. 
are given due prominence. 

It is peculiarly appropriate that one of the finest buildings on the campus of the 
Kansas State Agricultural College should be the one erected and maintained for the 
education of young women. 

The first and second floors of the building are devoted to laboratories, kitchens, 
and lecture rooms for the work in domestic science. One of the unique features is a 
large dining room, with eight individual kitchens, for the practical work in the preparation 
and serving of meals. The laboratories are well lighted and well equipped to teach 
the different nutrition courses. On the second floor of this building there is also a 
suite of rooms for the use of the young women for rest and study. The entire third 
floor is used by the Department of Domestic Art. The large sewing room, exhibit 
rooms and class rooms are well equipped to present the different courses in Domestic 
Art. 

There is probably no other home economics building in the United States so thor- 

118 



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Division of Home ^Economics — (Continued 




oughly equipped that is used exclusively for teaching of home economics, and yet it is 
not large enough for the work of the Division of Home Economics at the Kansas State 
Agricultural College. The classes in Home Art are still being taught in Anderson Hall 
because of lack of room in the Home Economics building. 

In teaching, a selection of facts and principles is made from the various sources, 
and in their presentation these are so related to the business and life of the home, as to 
give to homemaking the dignity of a profession. That woman finds her truest sphere 
of usefulness and greatest joy in the performance of the duties of homemaking is generally 
conceded, consequently a study of the home, its surroundings, its sanitation and decor- 
ation; the problems of buying materials needed in feeding, sheltering and clothing the 
family; the relation of the family and home to the community; and the moral, physical 
and intellectual development of the child, are important factors in a woman's education. 
The young women are, however, constantly reminded that technical knowledge and 
scientific skill fail to include the full meaning of education in its highest sense. They 
are taught that any training that fails to develop harmoniously, body, mind and spirit 
is inadequate and incomplete. They are brought face to face with ideals as well as 
with actualities, and are made to see that, while skillful labor gives dignity to life, 
grace, refinement, and self poise are the highest requisites for true service. Experience 
shows that such training teaches contentment, industry, order and cleanliness, and 
fosters a woman's independence and feeling of responsibility. The importance of such 
training for the young woman cannot be overestimated, for out of this comes the up- 
lifting of the home ideal, and the rearing of finer and stronger men and women, into freer 
and fuller lives of usefulness. 



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IIIIIIIIIIIHIIHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIl TITi^ 



J)epartment of JDomestic Science 




The Department of Domestic Science includes in 
its teaching the subjects of foods, dietetics, marketing 
and serving, home problems, household administration, 
sanitation and public health, institutional management 
and cookery, together with methods of teaching these 
subjects in the schools and the extension field. 

With the wider introduction of household arts in 
high schools, the advance made in the study of nutri- 
tion applied to the needs of the body, the pressing 
economic problems of the high cost of living, a change 
is being wrought in the field of instruction in Domestic 
Science. The teaching of cooking of food is not enough. 
The course must also include the nutritive and economic 
value. The education of no girl in foods is complete 
unless it makes her alive not only to all this but also to 
sociological conditions affecting the raw material and 
the manufactured products. 

The housekeeping of our towns, cities, etc., is falling more and more each year 
into the hands of women. For that reason home nursing, sanitation and public health 
have an added significance in the course. 

The efficiency system, so lauded in the business world, has as yet little use in the 
home, but we are beginning to make motion studies of dish washing, sweeping and bed- 
making — the drudgery task of the household — and it will not be long until the house- 
work is systematized as much as is compatible with the true spirit of the home, which 
after all is not to be reckoned in time, money, or systems of any kind. 




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domestic ~A,rt 




DURING the past four years, while the present senior class was busy working 
toward graduation, acquiring physical and mental strength, the Domestic 
Art Department has been growing and developing to meet the needs of the 
students. 

Many changes have occurred during that time, all tending toward progress, showing 
that the College and students are ready to grasp the new ideas, advanced by the leading 
educators in Home Economics work. Since technic, science, art, and educational 
subjects characterize the field of Domestic Art, courses which treat of the manipulation 
of materials, costume design, art needlework, millinery and textiles, have been offered. 
These subjects reach out to bring into close touch an understanding of materials, eco- 
nomic values, and correct art in dress construction. Domestic Art has often been called 
wholly materialistic, yet it is due to this kind of education that sewing may be called 
an art as well as a science, for back of this lies the mind and imagination, which through 
the skill of the worker produce something worth while. 

It is interesting to note that culture increases the demand for more artistic clothing, 
and great opportunity may be exercised in a course of Costume Design. This not alone 
teaches what is appropriate and becoming to the individual in a dress, but that a dress 
of good material, simply made, is better than cheap, tawdry finery. Neatness and at- 
tractiveness are based on simplicity and beauty, rather than the passing fancies and fads 
of the people who merely live to dress. 

The economic and scientific worker studies into the problems of textiles. It is a 
means to obtain better materials, and through specific problems, such as the use of the 
microscope and chemicals, adulterations may be detected in clothes. 

Since a large per cent, of the income is spent on clothing and house furnishings, an 
important and careful study should be given to textiles, so that in purchasing materials 
one may learn to know whether full value is received for money expended and to know 
that it is economy to purchase good rather than cheap materials. Throughout the 
progress of the department, the purpose has not been alone to meet these great domestic 
needs which come to each individual, but through its teaching to achieve successful 
results. 

It is to its graduates that the College looks to contribute towards its advancement, 
and expects each student to show her interest and loyalty by keeping in touch with new 
work and introducing it into the community life of which she is a part. 



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W/Mi 



Iffail ait6 farewell 



THE Class of 1915, as it leaves the College, goes into a world of greater opportunities 
and higher aspirations than has been entered by any preceding class. While 
life is ever growing more efficient, it is at the same time growing more nearly 
ideal. While every man and woman is seeking greater and greater success in his voca- 
tion, he is at the same time recognizing greater and greater responsibilities for active, 
vital service. 

For both personal success and altruistic service the members of the Class of 1915 
are well fitted. A record of faithful, efficient college work, of active participation in 
college affairs, of devotion to the best interests of the institution, causes the Class now 
to receive the hearty commendation and earnest good wishes of the Board of Adminis- 
tration, of the Faculty, and of all the underclassmen. 

The members of the Class of 1915 will join the ranks of the efficient and faithful 
alumni who look backward to their college days for new inspiration in their duties, but 
to whom the college also looks with pride and gratitude. Much of what the college is, 
it owes to its former students. It is a constant pleasure to those interested in the in- 
stitution to look over the country, and indeed other countries as well, and see alumni 
not only efficient farmers, efficient scientists, efficient teachers, efficient engineers, 
efficient business men, efficient home makers, but also leaders in the life of their com- 
munities and their states, to which they are giving higher purposes for the individual, 
larger conceptions of civic duty, and more effectual ideals of social betterment. To the 
example of such success and such service, the College points the Class of 1915 with 
full confidence. 

Sincerely yours, 



-jfM/a^z: 



President. 




127 



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^oar6 of -Administration 




The Hon. Ed. T. Hackney, President 
Term Expires 1917. 

The Hon. E. W. Hoch 
Term Expires 1915 

The Hon. (Mrs.) Cora G. Lewis 
Term Expires 1917 



D. M. Bowen, Secretary 



128 



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Ol)4 3Joaro of ^Instruction 




s 



HENRY JACKSON WATERS, B. S. A., LL. D. 
President of the College 

JOHN DANIEL WALTERS. D. A. 
Professor of Architecture and Drawing 

JULIUS TERRASS WILLARD, D. Sc. 

Dean of the Division of General Science 

Chemist of the Experiment Stations 

Professor of Chemistry 

BENJAMIN LUCE REMICK, Ph. M. 
Professor of Mathematics 

HERBERT FULLER ROBERTS, M. S. 

Professor of Botany 

ALBERT DICKENS, M. S. 

Professor of Horticulture 

CLARK MILLS BRINK, Ph. D. 

Dean of the College 

Assistant to the President 

Professor of English Literature 

RALPH RAY PRICE, A. M. 
Professor of History and Civics 

JULIUS ERNEST KAMMEYER, M.A., LL.D. 
Professor of Economics 

JOHN VANZANDT CORTELYOU, Ph. D. 
Professor of German 

OLOF VALLEY, B. M. 

Professor of Music 

FRANCIS SIEGEL SCHOENLEBER, D.V.S., M.S.A. 
Professor of Veterinary Medicine 

JOHN HAROLD MILLER, A. M. 
Dean of the Division of College Extension 

JOHN ORR HAMILTON, B. S. 
Professor of Physics 

MARY PIERCE VAN ZILE 
Dean of the Division of Home Economics 

LOWELL EDWIN CONRAD, M. S. 

Professor of Civil Engineering 

CHARLES ANDERSON SCOTT, B. S. 

Kansas State Forester 

LESLIE ARTHUR FITZ, B. S. 

Professor of Milling Industry 

EDWIN LEE HOLTON, A. B. 

Professor of Education 
Director of the Summer School 

ANDREY ABRAHAM POTTER, S. B. 
Dean of the Division of Engineering 
Director of Engineering Experiment Station 
Professor of Steam and Gas Engineering 

ROY ANDREW SEATON, M. S. 
Professor of Applied Mechanics and Machine Design 



WILLIAM M. JARDINE, B. S. A. 

Dean of the Division of Agriculture 

Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station 

JAMES WILLIAM SEARSON, A. M. 
Professor of the English Language 

OLLIE EZEKIEL REED, M. S. 

Professor of Dairy Husbandry 

GUY SUMMER LOWMAN, B. P. E. 

Professor of Physical Education 
Director of Physical Training 

ARTHUR BOURNE SMITH, B. L. S. 

Librarian 

WILLIAM ADAMS LIPPINCOTT, B. S. 

Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

WILBER ANDREW COCHEL, A. B., B. S. 

Professor of Animal Husbandry 

LELAND DAVID BUSHNELL, B. S. 

Professor of Bacteriology 

BESSIE WEBB BIRDSALL 
Professor of Domestic Art 

ROY ALISON HILL, Second Lieutenant, Seventh 

United States Infantry 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Commandant of Cadets 

LELAND EVERETT CALL, M. S. 
Professor of Agronomy 

GEORGE ADAM DEAN, M. S. 
Professor of Entomology 

ROBERT KIRKLAND NABOURS, Ph. D. 

Professor of Zoology 
Curator of the Natural History Museum 

LEONARD WHITTLESEY GOSS, D. V. M. 

Professor of Pathology 

RALPH DYKSTRA, D. V. M. 
Professor of Surgery 

WALTER SCOTT GEARHART, B. S. in C. E. 

Professor of Highway Engineering 

State Engineer, Division of College Extension 

MARGARET HELEN HAGGART, A. M. 
Professor of Domestic Science 

CLARENCE ERLE REID, B. S. in E. E. 
Professor of Electrical Engineering 

ALBERT EDWARD SHOWER, A. M. 
Professor of Public Speaking 

EDWARD NORRIS WENTWORTH, M. S. 
Professor of Animal Breeding 

FRANCES LANGDON BROWN, B. S., A. B. 

Director of Home Economics, Division of College 

Extension 



iiiiliiimllNinilililliiillliiiiliiiilHliinlii.1 




EDWARD CARL JOHNSON, A. M. 

Superintendent of Institutes and Demonstrations, 
Division of College Extension 

MICHAEL FRANCIS AHEARN, M. S. 

Associate Professor of Horticulture 

HARRY LLEWELLYN KENT, B. S. 
Principal of School of Agriculture 
Associate Professor of Education 

WILLIAM HIDDLESON ANDREWS, A. B. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

HERBERT HIRAM KING, A. M. 

Professor of Chemistry 
Chemist in Engineering Experiment Station 

CHARLES OSCAR SWANSON. N. Agr. 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Chemistry 

Associate Chemist in Agricultural Experiment Station 

HARRY BRUCE WALKER, B. S. in C. E. 

Associate Professor of Irrigation and Drainage 

Engineering 

Drainage and Irrigation Engineer, Division of College 

Extension 

ALFRED EVERETT WHITE, M. S. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 

WALTER WILLIAM CARLSON 

Associate Professor of Shop Practice 
Superintendent of Shops 

EDWARD HARTMAN REISNER, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Education 

EDWARD DONALD BAKER, A. M. 
Associate Professor of Rural Economics 

JOHN ROBERTSON MAC ARTHUR, Ph. D. 
Associate Professor of the English Language 

CARL OSTRUM, A. M. 
Associate Professor of the English Language 

GEORGE KELLER HELDER 

Superintendent, Fort Hays Branch Experiment 

Station 

GEORGE SHERWOOD HINE, B. S. A. 
State Dairy Commissioner 

JACOB LUND, M. S. 
Superintendent of Heat and Power 

ROBERT HENRY BROWN, B. M. 
Associate Professor of Music 

PLEASANT CRABTREE 

Lecturer on Farm Management, Division of College 

Extension 

GEORGE EBEN BRAY, M. E. 
Industrial Engineer, Division of College Extension 

WILMER ESLA DAVIS, A. B. 
Assistant Professor of Botany 

JAMES HENRY BURT, D. V. M. 

Assistant Professor of Veterinary Medicine 

CHARLES WILBUR McCAMPBELL, B.S. : D.V.M. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

GEORGE OGDEN GREENE, M. S. 
Lecturer on Horticulture, Division of College Extension 

ALVIN SCOTT NEALE, B. S. A. 

Assistant Superintendent of Institutes and Lecturer on 

Dairy Husbandry. Division of College Extension 



PORTER JOSEPH NEWMAN, M. S. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

NELSON ANTRIM CRAWFORD, Jr., A. M. 
Assistant Professor of the English Language, in Charge 
of Industrial Journalism 

JOSIAH SIMSON HUGHES, M. S. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

GRACE EMILY DERBY, A. B. 
Assistant Librarian 

RAY IAMS THROCKMORTON, B. S. 

Assistant Professor of Soils 

JAMES EDWARD ACKERT, Ph. D. 

Assistant Professor of Zoology 
Parasitologist in Agricultural Experiment Station 

HOWARD W. BRUBAKER, Ph. D. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

JOHN WALTER GOOD, Ph. D. 
Assistant Professor of English Literature 

JOHN C. WERNER, A. M. 

Director of Instruction by Correspondence, Division of 

College Extension 

SAMUEL CECIL SALMON, B. S. 

Assistant Professor of Farm Crops 

INA FOOTE COWLES, B. S. 
Assistant Professor of Domestic Art 

RAYMOND GARFIELD TAYLOR, A. B. 

Assistant Professor of History and Civics 

EUSTACE VIVIAN FLOYD, B. S. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

IVOR VICTOR ILES, A. M. 
Assistant Professor of History and Civics 

HARRISON ELEAZER PORTER, B. S. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

JAMES BURGESS FITCH, B. S. 
Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry 

WILLIAM TIMOTHY STRATTON, A. M. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

OLIVER WILLIAM HUNTER, M. S. 
Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

MARY THERESA HARMAN. Ph. D. 

Assistant Professor of Zoology 

CLAUDE VESTAL, B. S. A. 
Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

HALLAM WALKER DAVIS, A. M. 
Assistant Professor of the English Language 

PAUL SMITH WELCH, Ph. D. 
Assistant Professor of Entomology 

THOMAS POWELL HASLAM, M. S. 
Assistant Professor of Veterinary Medicine 

GEORGE ELLSWORTH RABURN, M. S. 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

WALTER HORACE BURR 

Assistant Director, Department of Rural Service, 

Division of College Extension 



130 




iiitriiiiiiiiiiiiiTaasf»tiii|iiiiiiiiiitfiiiiiiiniifiiiMfiiiiiiin nniEuz 



Ot)<2 &oard of instruction — Continued 




EDGAR LEMUEL TAGUE, A. M. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Assistant in Protein Chemistry 
Agricultural Experiment Station 

WALDO ERNEST GRIMES, B. S. 
Assistant Professor of Farm Management 

m HARRY UMBERGER, B. S. 

Supervisor" of Demonstrations, Division of College 

Extension 

CHESTER ALLEN ARTHUR UTT, M. S. 
Associate in Food Analysis 

RAYMOND CLIFFORD WILEY, B. S. 

Associate in Feeding-stuffs and Fertilizer Analysis 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

ADA RICE, M. S. 

Assistant Principal of School of Agriculture 

Instructor in the English Language 



DAISY DOROTHY ZEININGER, A. 
Instructor in Mathematics 



B. 



ANNETTE LEONARD, A. B. 
Instructor in the English Language 

WILLIAM LEONARD HOUSE 

Instructor in Woodwork 
Foreman of the Carpenter Shops 

ESTELLA MAY BOOT, A. M. 
Instructor in the English Language 

JAMES RUSSELL JENNESS, B. S. 
Instructor in Physics 

FRANK CLYDE HARRIS, B. S. 

Instructor in Architecture, and Drawing 

EDWIN CYRUS MILLER, Ph. D. 
Instructor in Botany 

THORNTON HAYES 

Instructor in Machine Tool Work 

Foreman of Machine Shops 

EDWARD GRANT 
Instructor in Molding 
Foreman of Foundry 

ELDEN VALORIUS JAMES, A. M. 
Instructor in History and Civics 

FLSEPH HENRY MERRILL, Ph. D. 

Instructor in Entomology 
Assistant Entomologist 

MAURICE COLE TANQUARY, Ph. D. 

Instructor in Entomology 
Assistant Entomologist 

ASALINE MAITLAND BAKER, B. L. S. 
Head Cataloguer, in Library 

VIRGINIA LEE MEADE 

Instructor in Domestic Science 

IDA ETHEL RIGNEY, B. S. 
Instructor in Domestic Science 

BERTHA GERICKE 
Research Assistant in Library 

CHARLES WESLEY HOBBS, D. V. M. 
Instructor in Veterinary Medicine 

CARL JOHN MERNER, B. P. E. 
Instructor in Physical Education 

CONSTANCE MIRIAM SYFORD, A. M. 

Instructor in the English Language 



BERTRAM WHITTIER WELLS, A. B. 

Instructor in Botany 

FRED CHARLES WINSHIP, A. M. 
Instructor in the English Language 

PAGE BLEDSOE, M. S. 
Instructor in Farm Crops 

GLENN ARTHUR GILBERT, B. S. 

Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 

GEORGE ELDON THOMPSON, B. S. 

Field Superintendent of Substations 

ARTHUR ROY FEHN, Ph. B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

JOHN GROVER JACKLEY, D. V. M. 
Instructor in Bacteriology 

LOUIS HENRY LIMPER, A. M. 
Instructor in German 

PERRY JOHN FREEMAN, B. S. 
Instructor in Applied Mechanics 

SIEBERT LUKE SIMMERING, M. S. 
Instructor in Steam and Gas Engineering 

EMMA HOLROYD, B. S. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

JESSID ANNABERTA REYNOLDS, A. B. 
Instructor in History and Civics 

CHARLES ERNEST MILLAR, M. S. 
Instructor in Soils 

FRANK CARL GUTSCHE. B. S. 

Instructor in Chemistry 

FORREST FAYE FRAZIER, C. E. 
Instructor in Civil Engineering 

DAVID ERNEST LEWIS, B. S. 
Instructor in Horticulture 

WALTER GOLDSBERRY ALLEE, B. S. 
Instructor in Physics 

MYRON RALPH BOWERMAN, M. E. 
Instructor in Mechanical Drawing and Machine Design 

LOUISE FEWELL 
Instructor in Domestic Art 

CHARLES FRANKLIN HOLLADAY 
Instructor in Physical Education 

JOHN D. LEWIS, B. S. 
Instructor in Animal Husbandry 

WILLIAM HENRY SANDERS. B. S. 
Instructor in Farm Motors 

ROLLA WOODS MILLER, A. B. 
Instructor in Chemistry 

GRAYSON BELL McNAIR 
Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

FREDERICK ALFRED WIRT, B. S. 
Instructor in Farm Mechanics 

EMMA FLORA FECHT 
Instructor in Domestic Art 

RAY GATEWOOD, B. S. 

Instructor in Animal Husbandry 



131 



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Ol)c 3Soar6 of 3 instruction — (Tontinue& 




ARAMINTA HOLMAN 
Instructor in Drawing 

ETHEL HANNAH JONES, B. S. 
Instructor in Domestic Art 

WALTER EDWIN TOMSON, B. S. 
Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 

HARRY BARCLAY YOCOM, A. B. 
Instructor in Zoology 

LEO EDWARD MELCHERS, M. S. 

Instructor in Plant Pathology 

Assistant Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Experiment 

Station 

RALPH KENNEY, B. S. A. 
Instructor in Farm Crops 

JAMES WILLIAM BENNER, D. V. M. 
Instructor in Veterinary Medicine 

WILLIAM HARRY BAIR, M. S. 
Instructor in Physics 

MARGARET LOUISE BURNS 
Instructor in Physical Education in Charge of Women 

HOMER HALL, A. M. 
Instructor in the English Language 

OTIS EARLE HALL, A. B. 
Director of Junior Extension Service, Division of Col- 
lege Extension 
Cooperative Agent of United States Department 
of Agriculture 

DANIEL EMMETT LYNCH 

Instructor in Forging 

Foreman of Blacksmith Shop 

OLIVE AMY SHEETS, M. S. 
Instructor in Domestic Science 

THOMAS JESSIE TALBERT, B. S. A. 
Lecturer on Entomology, Division of College Extension 

ILO IVAN TAYLOR, B. S. 
Instructor in Applied Mechanics and Machine Design 

ROSS MADISON SHERWOOD, B. S. 

Lecturer on Poultry Husbandry, Division of College 

Extension 

CHARLES YOST 
Assistant in Machine Shop 

JOHN THOMPSON PARKER 
Assistant in Woodwork 

HUGH OLIVER 
Assistant in Heat and Power Distribution 

CLAUDE CARROLL CUNNINGHAM, B. S. 
Assistant in Cooperative Experiments 

AMY ALENA ALLEN, B. S. 
Assistant in Printing 

JESSIE GULICK 
Assistant Cataloguer in Library 

ALANSON LOLA HALLSTED, B. S. 
Assistant in Dry Farming 

CLARE LA VON BIDDISON, B. S. 
Assistant in Vocal Music 

ALBERT RICHARD LOSSH, B. S. 
Assistant State Engineer, Division of College Extension 



BRUCE STEINHOFF WILSON, B. S. 
Assistant in Cooperative Experiments 

BURR HOWEY OZMENT 
Band Leader 

ASHER EULESTA LANGWORTHY, Ph. C. 

Feeding-Stuffs Inspector, Agricultural Experiment 

Station 

LELIA DUNTON, M. S. 
Assistant in Milling Industry 

OLIVER MORRIS FRANKLIN, D. V. M. 
Assistant in Veterinary Medicine 

HELEN LOUISE GREEN 
Assistant in Domestic Science 

WALTER JACOB KING, B. S. 

Assistant Drainage Engineer, Division of College 

Extension 

JAMES WALKER McCOLLOCH, B. S. 
Assistant in Entomology 

FLORENCE SNELL, B. S. 

Lecturer on Home Economics, Division of College 

Extension 

WILLIAM ARMFIELD BOYS, B. S. 

District Demonstration Agent, West Central Kansas, 

Division of College Extension 

HARLEY JAMES BOWER, M. S. 
Lecturer on Soils, Division of College Extension 

OLIVER CARLTON MILLER 

Feeding-Stuffs Inspector, Agricultural Experiment 

Station 

ROBERT KLINE BONNETT, B. S. 
Assistant in Farm Crops 

JAMES PLUMMER POOLE, B. S. 
Assistant in Botany 

FRED SAWYER MERRILL, M. S. 
Assistant in Horticulture 

ELSIE ADAMS, B. S. 

Assistant in Library 

GRACE CUSHING AVERILL 
Assistant in Drawing 

EDNA MAE BAIRD 
Assistant in Music 

WILLIAM HENRY BALL 
Assistant in Woodwork 

HAROLD ROSS BRAKEMAN 
Assistant in Woodwork 

BERTHA EDITH BUXTON, B. S. 
Assistant in Domestic Art 

ROBERT VERNON CHRISTIAN, D. V/M. 
Superintendent of Serum Production 

JENNIE LYNN COX, B. S. 
Assistant in Domestic Science 

MAYME DAVIS, B. S. 
Assistant in Domestic Science 

CLEMENS INKS FELPS, B. S. 

Assistant in Highway Engineering, Division of.College 

Extension 



132 



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Ol>c y$oarb of Instruction — (Continued 




ROBERT GETTY, B. S. A. 
Assistant in Forage Crops, Fort Hays Branch Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station 

GRACE GLASGOW, M. S. 
Assistant in Bacteriology 

EDITH ELIZABETH HAGUE, A. B. 
Assistant in Library 

MELVA DELIA HARKER, B. S. 
Assistant in Domestic Science 

ERWIN WILLIAM HENRY 
Assistant in Blacksmithing 

GARNET LEONE HUTTO 
Assistant in Physical Education for Women 

FREDERIC ARTHUR KIENE, B. S. 

Assistant in Cereal Crops, Fort Hays Branch 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

JOSEPH IRL KIRKPATRICK, D. V. M. 
Assistant in Veterinary Medicine 

ERWIN JONES MONTAGUE, B. S. 

Assistant to Superintendent, Fort Hays Branch 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

FRED WINFIELD MOSSMAN 
Assistant in Power Plant 

RAY V. MURPHY, B. S. 
Assistant in Chemistry 

ALICE EDNA SKINNER, B. S. 
Assistant in Domestic Science 

PEARLE EBERDINE THOMAS, B. S. 
Assistant in Domestic Art 

WALTER AMOS TURNBULL 
Assistant in Blacksmithing 

CHESTER LEE WODDINGTON 
Assistant in Power Plant 

LEE HAM GOULD, B. S. 

District Demonstration Agent, Southwest Kansas 

Division of College Extension 

ANDREW MINIE PATERSON, B. S. 
Assistant in Animal Husbandry 

STANLEY ALBERT SMITH, B. S. 
Assistant in Architecture and Drawing 

EDITH ELLEN JONES, B. S. 
Assistant to the Dean of the Division of Agriculture 

LEWELLYN GAINES HEPWORTH, B. S. 
Feeding-Stuffs Inspector, Agricultural Experiment 
Station 

HAROLD MORTON JONES, B. S. 
Deputy State Dairy Commissioner 

VINTON VIRGIL DETWILER, B. S. 
Assistant in Industrial Journalism 

FANCHON IDOLINE EASTER 
Assistant in Music 

LEWIS LEROY LEEPER 
Miller, Department of Milling Industry 

WILLIAM RAY ALLEN, A. B. 
Assistant in Zoology 



WILLIAM PATRICK HAYES, B. S. 
Assistant in Entomology 

JOHN C. SHUTT, B. S. 
Assistant in Steam and Gas Engineering 

ETHEL VANDERWILT, B. S. 
Assistant in Animal Husbandry 

FLOYD PATTISON 

Assistant in Heat and Power 

PRESTON ESSEX McNALL, B. S. 

Assistant in Farm Management Studies 
Division of College Extension 

ALBERT WILLIAM BELLOMY, B. S. 

Assistant in Zoology 
Assistant in Genetics, Agricultural Experiment Station 

LUCIAN EASTMAN HOBBS, D. V. M. 
Assistant in Hog-Cholera Serum Production 

ALBERT GARLAND HOGAN, Ph. D. 

Assistant in Animal Nutrition, Agricultural 

Experiment Station 

REBECCA PAULINE BARTHOLOMEW 
Assistant in Domestic Science 

MARION PERCIVAL BROUGHTON, A. B-, B. S. 

Institute Lecturer on Home Economics 
Division of College Extension 

LOUISE CALDWELL, A. B. 
Lecturer on Home Economics 
Division of College Extension 

ELIZABETH HAMILTON DAVIS, A.B., B. L. S. 

Assistant Reference Librarian 

LYLE McFEATTERS DEAN, A. B. 
Assistant in Mathematics 

EUGENIA FAIRMAN, B. M. 
Assistant in Music 

PERCY LEIGH GAINEY, A. M. 

Assistant in Bacteriology 

Soil Bacteriologist, Agricultural Experiment Station 

EDMAN GREENFIELD, A. B. 
Assistant in Chemistry 

MARION HARRISON 
Assistant in Domestic Art 

FLORENCE HUNT 
Assistant in Domestic Art 

NELLIE IRENE McCLURG, A. B. 
Assistant in Domestic Science 

FRANK EDWARD MIXA 
Assistant in Poultry Husbandry 

GRACE ADELLA PALMER 
Assistant in Domestic Art 

NELLIE EVELYN REED, B. S. 
Assistant in Zoology 

ADDIE DORRITT ROOT, A. B., B. S. 

Lecturer on Home Economics, Division of College 

Extension 



133 




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io\)c !5oar6 of Snstruction— Continued 




OTIS EVERETT STRODTMAN, D. V. S. 
Deputy Inspector and College Representative 
Marshall County Hog-Cholera Eradication Project 

WILLIAM ALLISON SUMNER, B. S. 

Assistant in Industrial Journalism 

ERWIN MILTON TIFFANY, A. B. 

Assistant in Correspondence Study, Division of 

College Extension 

LUCILE WARNOCK, A. B. 

Assistant in Library 

REUBEN EDWARD WISEMAN. B. S. 

Assistant in Farm Mechanics 

EPHA ESTELLA MATHER, B. S. 
Lecturer in Home Economics, Division of College 

Extension 

WALTER LEROY LATSHAW, B. S. 

Assistant in Soil Analysis, Agricultural Experiment 
Station 

HARRY LEWIS SMITH, B. S. 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry 

JOSEPH CARL ROSS 
Assistant in Power Plant 

H. T. NIELSON 
District Demonstration Agent, Northwest Kansas 
Division of College Extension 

CARL G. ELLING, B. S. 

District Demonstration Agent, Southeast Kansas 

Division of College Extension 

STANLEY PENRHYN CLARK, B. S. 

Superintendent, Colby Branch Agricultural Experiment 
Station 

MALCOLM SEWELL, M. S. 

Superintendent, Garden City Branch Agricultural 

Experiment Station 

FRANCIS JOHN TURNER 

Superintendent, Dodge City Branch Agricultural 
Experiment Station 

CHARLES ELMER CASSEL, B. S. 
Superintendent, Tribune Branch Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station 

CHARLES HENRY TAYLOR, B. S. 

Atchison County Agricultural Agent 
Division of College Extension 

PONTUS HENRY ROSS, B. S. 

Agricultural Agent, Leavenworth County 
Division of College Entension 

0. C. HAGANS 

Agricultural Agent, Paola County 

Division of College Extension 

C. K. PECK 

Agricultural Agent, Mound City 
Division of College Extension 

E. J. MACY 

Agricultural Agent, Independence 
Division of College Extension 



O. P. DRAKE 

Agricultural Agent, Winfield 
Division of College Extension 

E. P. LANE 
Agricultural Agent, Newton 
Division of College Extension 

H. L. POPENOE 

Agricultural Agent, Emporia 
Division of College Extension 

W. E. WATKINS 

Agricultural Agent, Iola 

Division of College Extension 

AMBROSE FOLKER 

Agricultural Agent, Mankato 
Division of College Extension 

LYMAN DALTON LA TOURETTE, B.S.A. 

Fellow in Farm Crops 

JOHN BEARDSLEY SIELINGER, B. S. 

Fellow in Soils 

HARRY WINFIELD CAVE, B. S. A. 
Fellow in Dairy Husbandry 

JESSIE JONATHAN FREY, D. V. M. 
Fellow in Bacteriology 

WALTER ALBERT BUCK, B. S. 

Fellow in Engineering 

JAMES THOMAS LARDNER 
Financial Secretary and Purchasing Agent 

jessie Mcdowell machir 

Registrar 

BERZELIUS LESLIE STROTHER 
Superintendent of Printing 

ROSCOE TOWNLEY NICHOLS, B. S., M. D. 
College Physician 

ANNA MARIE GREENE, A. M., M. D. 
Assistant College Physician 

GEORGE RICHARD PAULING 

Engineer of Power Plant 

GEORGE FRANKLIN WAGNER, B. S. 

Custodian 

EDWARD CLAEREN, Commissary Sergeant, U.S.A. 

(Retired) 

Assistant to the Commandant 

ALFRED LESTER CLAPP, B. S. 

Farm Foreman 

CYRUS EARL BUCHANAN 
Dairy Herdsman 

NORTON LEWIS HARRIS 
Superintendent of Poultry 

LESLIE ROSS 

Herdsman 



134 



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-Administrative Officers 



"Those who do rule our estate." 

— Shakespeare. 



President 

Dean of the Division of Agriculture 

Dean of the Division of Engineering 

Dean of the Division of General Science 

Dean of the Division of Home Economics 

Dean of the College 

Dean of the Division of College Extension 

Director of the Summer School 

Principal of the School of Agriculture 

Registrar 

Financial Secretary and Purchasing Agent 

Librarian 

Custodian 



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Henry Jackson Waters 

William M. Jardine 

A. A. Potter 

J. T. Willard 

Mrs. Mary P. VanZile 

Clark M. Brink 

J. H. Miller 

E. L. Holton 

H. L. Kent 

Miss Jessie McD. Machir 

J. T. Lardner 

Arthur B. Smith 

G. F. Wagner 




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<Bra6uate (Tlass 





Blanche Beatrice Vanderlip 

B. S. Home Economics, 1910, Kansas State Agricultural 

College 
Master of Science, 1915 

John B. Sieglinger 

B. S. Oklahoma A. & M., 1913 
M. S. Agriculture (Soils), 1915 

Frank Alfred Gougler 

B. S. Oklahoma A. & M., 1909 
M. S. Agriculture (Soils), 1915 

Lyman Dalton LaTourrette 

B. S. A. University of Arizona, 1913 
M. S. Agriculture (Crops), 1915 

136 



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Seniors 



"farewell ! A woro that must be — anb ball) been — 
A sound wbicb, makes us linger; — ?et — Tarewell." 

— Byron 




137 



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Merrill E. Agnew Smith Center 

Veterinary Medicine 

A *; "K" Fraternity; Veterinary Medical 
Association; Scarab 



Albert William Aicher Denver, Colo. 

Dairy Husbandry 
AZ; Webster; Scarab 



Ruth Harriet Aiman 
Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Forum 



Lulu E. C. Albers 
Home Economics 




Manhattan 



LaCrosse 



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Maurine Allison 
Home Economics 



James E. Alsop 

Electrical Engineering 
Franklin; A. I. E. E. 



G. H. Anderson 
Agronomy 



George H. Ansdell 
Animal Husbandry 
Acacia 



McPherson 



Wakefield 



Lincoln Center 



Jamestown 



139 




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Ruth Arbuthnot 
Home Economics 



Elsie Loretta Baird 
Home Economics 



Ernest Baird 
General Science 
Hamilton; Y. M. C. A. 




Bellville 



Cherry vale 



Minneapolis 



Bertha Fern Baker 
Home Economics 
mr; Ionian; Y. W. C. A. 



Narka 





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Ira William Baker 
General Science 



Manhattan 



K. G. Baker 

Animal Husbandry 
ZAE; Garcia; Pax; Scarab 



Grace A. Barker 
Home Economics 
rnr; Ionian 



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Edna Frances Barber 
Home Economics 

rnr; ZK*; Ionian; Student Council 
Y. W. C. A. 




> 



John Jasper Bayles 
Agronomy 
Y. M. C. A. 



F. M. Bealey 
Agronomy 
Dairy Association 



Lucille Beall 
*K*; Xix 
Home Economics 



Manhattan 



Morrill 



San Marcos, Texas 



J. Emanuel Bengtson Lindsborg 

Mechanical Engineering 
ST . .. x ». F ra i ern it. y] A. S. M. E.; En- 
gineering Association 




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Mabel K. Bennett 
Home Economics 



Louise Blair 

Home Economics 
Ionian; Y. W. C. A. 



Elsie Mae Blaylock 
Home Economics 
Eurodelphian 



Myrtle Pearl Blythe 
Home Economics 
AM; Ionian. 




Manhattan 




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Mulvane 


m 








Smith Center 




a* 


White City 








-73 


I 


143 


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Marie Anita Boyle 
Home Economics 
Browning; Y. W. C. A. 



Spivey 



W. Albert Bright Plainville 

Veterinary Medicine 

IIKA; Veterinary Medical Association 



H. V. Brothers 

General Science 



Agra 



Ena Bess Brown 
Home Economics 
Ionian; Y. W. C. A. 



Manhattan 



144 




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Henry B. Brown 

Electrical Engineering 
Alpha Beta; A. I. E. E. 



Mont Ida 



D'Elsie Bryan 

Home Economics 

HBII; Women's Pan-Hellenic; Y. W. C. A 
Cabinet 



George Herbert Bunnel 
Animal Husbandry 
Saddle and Sirloin Club 



Arthur L. Burkholder 

Animal Husbandry 
" K" Fraternity 



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Chester A. Carter Garden City 

Mechanical Engineering 
Z*A; Engineering Association; A. S.M.E.; 
Freeman Club 




Elsie Luella Buchheim 
Home Economics 
Browning; Y. W. C. A. 



Winkler 



Eliza Burkdoll 
Home Economics 
Y. W. C. A. 



Ottawa 



Wichita 



Effie May Carp 
Home Economics 

Browning; Y. W. C. A.; Forum; Oratorical 
Board 



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MIIMIIMIIIIIIIII 



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IlllllJIlilJIllUIIIIII 



Ethel Esther Cary 
Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 



Manhattan 



Mary R. Churchward Wichita 

Home Economics 

*K<J>; Y. W. C. A.; Women's Pan- 
Hellenic 



Pauline Clarke Paola 

Home Economics 

Eurodelphian; Dramatic Club; Newman 
Club 



Percy W. Cockerill 
Agronomy 



Manhattan 



147 



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William B. Coffman 
Agronomy 
Hamilton; Y. M. C. A. 



Manhattan 



Alvin T. Coith Manhattan 

Architecture 

Dramatic Club; Architects' Club; En- 
gineering Association 



Herbert Spencer Coith 
General Science 
Hamilton; Dramatic Club 



Manhattan 



Henry Samuel Collins Fort Worth, Texas 
Animal Husbandry 

" K" Fraternity; Saddle and Sirloin Club; 
Y. M. C. A. 



148 






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James D. Colt 
General Science 

2N 



Manhattan 



Minerva Clare Cooper LaPorte City, Iowa 
Home Economics 
Ionian; Y. W. C. A. 



Mary Margaret Courter 
Home Economics 
Browning 



Harry H. Coxen 
General Science 
" K" Fraternity; Webster 



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Marguerite M. Elliot 
Home Economics 



Manhattan 



Nicholas F. Enns Inman 

General Science 

Ben; " K" Fraternity; Pan-Hellenic; Pax; 
Scarab 



Ralph C. Erskine Edgerton 

Agronomy 

Acacia; rSA; Garcia; Black Helmet; 
Y. M. C. A.; Pax; Scarab. 



Emma Evans 

Home Economics 

Alpha Beta; Dramatic Clib 



Liberal 



152 



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Harold C. Ewers 
Animal Husbandry 
SN; AZ; Pax 



Independence 



Laura Belle Falkenrich Manhattan 

Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A.; Dramatic Club 



Shelby Fell Haviland 

Electrical Engineering 

ST; riKA; Hamilton; Forum; A. I. E. E. 
A. S. M. E.; Engineering Association 



Lawrence V. Fickel Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 
2AE; ST; A. I. E. E.; Engineering 
Association. 



153 



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Carrie Belle Gardner 
Home Economics 

HBn 



Newton 



Charles William Gartrell Kansas City, 
Agronomy Missouri 

nKA; TZA; Scabbard and Blade; Pan- 
Hellenic; Pax; Scarab 



Louis Charles Geisendorf Clearwater 
Electrical Engineering 

Alpha Beta; A. I. E. E.; Engineering 
Association 



Charles W. Giffin Paola 

Mechanical Engineering 
S *ii; 2T; Engineering Association; Free- 
man Club 



156 



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Mary Ellen Glenn 
Home Economics 
Eurodelphian 



Waverly 



Harold Goble Riley 

General Science 
I1KA; Garcia; Engineering Association 



M. Blanche Gorrell 
Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 



WaKeeney 



Amy Pearl Gould Basin, Wyoming 

ZK*; Ionian; Forum; Dramatic Club; 
Y. W. C. A.; Oratorical Board 





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Merrill Leonard Gould Jamestown 

Animal Husbandry 
Webster; Saddle and Sirloin Club 



Maynard Goudy Waverly 

Electrical Engineering 
ST; Hamilton; Oratorical Board; A. I. E. 
E.; Engineering Association; Pax; 
Scarab; Royal Purple Staff 



Edythe Seavert Groome 
Home Economics 
Y. W. C. A. 



Manhattan 



Minnie A. Gugenhan May Day 

Home Economics 
rnr; Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 





ii'iiiiiiiMiiiiiminiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii iiiiiilWiiTTFTnniiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiHiiiiininliiiiiiiliiiiiMiiliiiiiiliiiiiiiirtV:-- 



Edna Gulick Winfield 

General Science 
Browning; Y. W. C. A.; Student Volunteer 



Mary Gurnea Belleville 

Home Economics 

HBII; Students Council; Xix; Royal 
Purple Staff 



William A. Hagan Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 

A *; Hamilton; Veterinary Medical As- 
sociation; Scarab; Royal Purple Staff 




Utica 



Roy F. Hagans 
Agronomy 

Franklin; Forum; Oratorical Board; Y. 
M. C. A. 



159 



9 










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Rembert L. Harshbarger Manhattan 

Home Economics 
A A 6; rnr; Dramatic Club 



Henley H. Haymaker 
Agronomy 

SN; TSA; "K" Fraternity; Y. M. C. A 
Cabinet; Scarab 



Elsie Catharine Hellwig 
Home Economics 
Ionian; Y. W. C. A. 



John Vern Hepler 
Agronomy 
IIKA; TSA; Garcia 



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Ruth Lucile Hill Wichita 

Home Economics 
AAG; Dramatic Club; Xix; Y. W. C. A. 



Mildred Calista Hollingsworth 

Home Economics Lincoln Center 

Ionian; Y. W. C. A. 



Calvin Andrew Hooker Tyro 

Electrical Engineering 
2T; Scabbard and Blade; A. I. E. E.; 
Engineering Association; Freeman 
Club; Pax; Scarab 



G. A. Hopp Sageeyah, Okla. 

Civil Engineering 

Engineering Association; Civil Engineering 
Society 



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Eva Hostetlbr Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 
The Quill; Y. W. C. A.; Royal Purple Staff 



Otto Lincoln Hubp Mexico City, Mexico 
Dairy Husbandry 

AZ; Athenian; Y. M. C. A.; Dairy 
Association 




John Hungerford 
Agronomy 



Manhattan 



Charles Axtell Hunter 
General Science 
SAE 



Blue Rapids 



163 








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Floyd W. Johnson Downs 

Agronomy 

Azlex; AZ; Pax; Scarab; Royal Purple 
Staff 



Mary Alberta Johnson ElDorado 

General Science 

ZK*; Ionian; Forum; Y. W. C. A.; 
Student Volunteer 



Oscar LeRoy Johnson Mead, Nebr. 

Saddle and Sirloin Club 



Eva M. Kell 

General Science 
Ionian; Y.W.C. A. 



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Jane Kingan 

Home Economics 
*K*; Y. W. C. A. 



Topeka 



Sara Katharine Laing Colorado Springs, 
Home Economics Colo. 

Ionian; Royal Purple Staff 



May Belle Landis 
General Science 
Ionian; Y. W. C. A. 



Kiowa 



William Albert Lathrop Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 
ST; The Quill; Athenian; Inter-Society 
Council; A. S. M. E.; Engineering 
Association; Collegian Board 



167 



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Fred M. Layton Blue Rapids 

Animal Husbandry 

Aztex; rsi; Pax; Scarab; Royal Purple 
Staff 



Foo Kau Lee 
Agronomy 
Y. M. C. A.; Cosmopolitan Club 





Honolulu, Hawaii 



James Walton Linn Manhattan 

Dairy Husbandry 
Scabbard and Blade; Hamilton; Students 

Council; Y. M. C. A.; Pax; Royal 

Purple Staff 



James Ralph Little 
Horticulture 
AZ; Hamilton; Rosaceae 



Topeka 



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Nelle Florence Longnecker 

Home Economics Kansas City 

Y. W. C. A. 



J. Howard Loomis 

Agronomy 

Webster; Dairy Association 



John B. Lund 
General Science 



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Willard J. Loomis 

Electrical Engineering 
ZT; Webster; Forum; A. I. E. E.; Engin- 
eering Association; Pax; Scarab; Man- 
ager, Royal Purple 




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Esther Grace Lyon 
Home Economics 
Ionian; Y. W. C. A. 



Nickerson 



James M. McArthur Walton 

Agronomy 

IIKA; Alpha Beta; Forum; Debating 
Council 



A. E. McClymonds 
Agronomy 
Aztex; KT>; " K" Fraternity; Pax 



Walton 



W. C. McConnell Downs 

Veterinary Medicine 

A •*; Hamilton; Veterinary Medical As- 
sociation; Y. M. C. A. 



170 



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Z. H. McDonnall GofF 

Veterinary Medicine 

Veterinary Medical Association; Y. M. 
C. A. 



Lewis Evermont McGinnis Kansas City, 
Animal Husbandry Mo. 

Ben; Saddle and Sirloin Club 



Pearle Irene McHenry 
Home Economics 
Alpha Beta 



Paola 



Wallace McIlrath 
Animal Husbandry 
Saddle and Sirloin Club 



Kingman 



171 







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Lorenzo B. Mann Hastings, Nebr. 

ZN; AZ; Pax; Scarab; Royal Purple Staff 



Mary Inez Mann 
Home Economics 
HBn 



Archie Lee Marble 
Horticulture 
AZ; Webster; Forum; Pax 



Elizabeth Abbie March 
Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 



172 




Wichita 



Esbon 



Topeka 



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Sadie M. Marvin 
Home Economics 
Y. W. C. A. 



Emporia 



George Mawhirter Wakarusa 

Mechanical Engineering 
A. S. M. E.; Engineering Association" 
Freeman Club 



John W. Meyer Chapman 

Veterinary Medicine 
A *; Veterinary Medical Association 



F. W. Milner 
Agronomy 
Y. M. C. A. 



Hartford 



173 



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Ella Mae Miltner 
Home Economics 
Eurodelphian;Y. W. C.A. 



Wichita 



W. S. Morrow 

Dairy Husbandry 
SAE; TSA 



Kansas City 



Helen Munger 
Home Economics 
Dramatic Club; Y. W. C. A. 



Carbondale 



Royal Reno Myers Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 
" K" Fraternity; Engineering Association; 
A. S. M. E. 




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Ruth Nygren 

Home Economics 
Dramatic Club 



Topeka 



Gertrude E. Palmer 
Home Economics 
Browning; Oratorical Board 



Hays 



Pauline Parkhurst 
Home Economics 
rnr; Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 



Kinsley 



John D. Parsons Arkansas City 

Mechanical Engineering 
Hamilton; Debating Council; Engineering 

Association; Freeman Club; A. S. M. 

E.; Y. M. C. A. 



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Mrs. Eleanor Patrick 
Home Economics 

The Quill; Ionian; Dramatic Club; Y. W. 
C. A. 



Clara A. Peairs 
General Science 




Eva Mae Pease 
Home Economics 
Browning; Debating Council; Y. W. C. A. 




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Edward Quinby Perry 
Agronomy 
SAE; T2A 



Manhattan 



Evelyn Marie Potter Barnes 

Home Economics 

Ionian; Oratorical Board; Dramatic Club; 
Y. W. C. A. 



Percival B. Potter 
Agronomy 
AZ 



Manhattan 



Bess Pyle 

Home Economics 
HBII; Y. W. C. A. 



Lawrence 



178 



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H. C. Reed Kansas City 

Veterinary Medicine 



Wray R. Reeves 

Animal Husbandry 
Saddle and Sirloin Club 



Clara Louise Robbins 
Home Economics 
Eurodelphian 



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W. L. Rhoades 

Mechanical Engineering 
Engineering Association; A. S. M. E 
Freeman Club 




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Georgia Emma Roberts Morrill 

Home Economics 
Ionian; Y. W. C. A.; Dramatic Club 



Harold Edward Rose 
General Science 



Manhattan 



Madge Rowell 
Eurodelphian 



Strasburg. Mo. 



Mabel Gertrude Ruggels 
Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 



Beverly 



180 




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Frank Sargent 
General Science 
TkeQuill; Collegian Staff 



Holton 



W. J. Scanlan 

Veterinary Medicine 

" K" Fraternity; Veterinary Medical As 
sociation 



Richard Jerome Sedivy 
Animal Husbandry 
Saddle and Sirloin Club 



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Anna Winifred Searl 
Home Economics 

Ionian; Y. W. C. A.; Estes Park Club; 
Student Volunteer. 




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Charles William Shaver Lincoln Center 
Architectural Engineering 
2T; Webster; Engineering Association; 
Architects' Club; Royal Purple Staff 



Meta Viola Sheaff Kansas City 

Home Economics 
AA6; Y. W. C. A.; Royal Purple Staff 



Ralph A. Shelly Atchison 

Mechanical Engineering 
Ben; 2T; A. S. M. E.; Engineering 
Association 



Jennie Shoup Mulvane 

Home Economics 

mr; Ionian; Inter-Society Council; Y. 
W. C. A. 




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Wilbur N. Skourup Colony 

Agronomy 

Acacia; AZ; Webster; Forum; Pax; Scarab; 
Editor, Royal Purple 



Corwin C. Smith Ellsworth 

Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E.; Engineering Association 



Cameron M. Smith 
Veterinary Medicine 
Veterinary Medical Association 



Wakefield 



Erle Hazlett Smith Kansas City 

General Science 

" K" Fraternity; Collegian Board; Collegian 
Staff; Royal Purple Staff 



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Florence Smith 
Home Economics 
Ionian; Y. W. C. A. 



Manhattan 



Orliff Elmer Smith Manhattan 

General Science 

IIKA; Scabbard and Blade; Hamilton; 
Forum; Y. M. C. A.; Student Volun- 
teer 



Walter F. Smith Mankato 

General Science 

Webster; Dramatic Club; Y. M. C. A.; 
Collegian Board; Collegian Staff; Scar- 
ab; Royal Purple Staff 



Fred Stevenson 
General Science 
Ben; Scarab 



Salina = 




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Lois Katharine Stewart Spearville 

Home Economics 

Eurodelphian; Dramatic Club; Y. W. C. 
A.; Student Volunteer 



Edna Isabel St. John Wamego 

Home Economics 

rnr; Eurodelphian; Inter-Society Coun- 
cil; Y. W. C. A. 



H. W. Stockebrand Vernon 

Electrical Engineering 
Webster; A. I. E. E.; Engineering Associa- 
tion; Y. M. C. A. 



J. W. Stockebrand 
Agronomy 
Webster; Y. M. C. A. 



Vernon 



185 



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Emma Stratton 

Home Economics 
Ionian; Y. W. C. A. 



Frieda Matilda Stuewe 
Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 



Victor Fred Stuewe 
Dairy Husbandry 
AZ; Hamilton 




Ottawa 



Alma 



Alma 



Roy L. Swenson Lindsborg 

Mechanical Engineering 
ST; Hamilton; A. S. M. E.; Engineering 
Association; Freeman Club 



186 



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Ralph Waldo Taylor 
Animal Husbandry 
Webster; Saddle and Sirloin Club 



Sedgwick 



William Fuller Taylor Mexico City, 

General Science Mexico 

AZ; IIKA; Athenian; Forum; Y. M. C. A. 



Anna Elizabeth Thomas Kansas City, 

Home Economics Mo. 

Ionian; Y. W. C. A. 



Graydon Tilbury Manhattan 

Dairy Husbandry 
Hamilton; Dairy Association; Y. M. C. A. 



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Tom K. Toothaker Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 
Veterinary Medical Association 



Verma Treadway Newton 

Home Economics 
HBn; nir; Women's Pan-Hellenic 



Alberlina Tulloss 
Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 



Ottawa 



Arthur Unruh 
Agronomy 
Athenian; Y. M. C. A. 



Pawnee Rock 



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Augustus G. Vinson 
General Science 



Louise Chester Walbridge Manhattan 
Home Economics 
TUT; Ionian; Royal Purple Staff 



George I. Walsh 
Agronomy 
Newman Club; Agricultural Society 



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Walter Harris Washington Manhattan 
Horticulture 
2AE; " K" Fraternity 



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Grace Willits 

Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 



Topeka 




George W. Williams 
Dairy Husbandry 
Webster; Dairy Association 



Bigelow 



Bernice Elena Wilson Concordia 

Home Economics 

*K*; rnr; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Royal 
Purple Staff 



Elmer Warren Wilson 
Architecture 
Architects' Club 



Kansas City 



190 



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Harry H. Wilson 
Dairy Husbandry 
Webster; Dairy Association 



Silver Lake 



Ina Belle Wilson 
General Science 
ZK *;'_Ionian; Forum; Y. W. C. A. 



R. T. Wilson 

Veterinary Medicine 
SN; Black Helmet; Scarab 



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Wilmer Homer Wilson 
Animal Husbandry 

IIKA; Hamilton; Forum; Saddle and Sir- 
loin Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Pax; 
Scarab 



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Fred E. Woodward 
General Science 
Acacia 



W. R. Worthington Manhattan 

Agronomy 
Agricultural Society; Y. M. C. A. 





Manhattan 



Gertrude Wunder Valley Falls 

Home Economics 

Browning; Forum; Lyceum Course Com- 
mittee; Y. W. C. A. 



C. W. Wyland Harlan 

Mechanical Engineering 
Freeman Club; Engineering Association; 
A. S. M. E. 



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Esther Zeininger Wichita 

Home Economics 
HBII; Women's Pan-Hellenic; Y. W. C. A. 




193 



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Ifistor? of Ol)e (Elass of 
Nineteen Hfuttdre6 an6 fifteen 




THE first meeting of the Class of 1915 was called to order by J. W. Linn for the 
purpose of forming the Class organization, on the 28th day of September, 
1911. Mr. Linn was elected as the temporary chairman and Miss Louise Wal- 
bridge to act as the temporary secretary. At this meeting a committee, composed of 
Mr. Pollock, Mr. Keithline, Mr. Pateman, Mr. Brown and Miss Walbridge was 
appointed to draw up a constitution for the approval of the class. In due time the 
body of "Law Makers" presented to the class for discussion the constitution of the 
class, which was adopted by the class on Oct. 26, 1911, A. D. Mr. Linn was chosen 
to be the head of the executive affairs during the period of embarking on the "Sea 
of Learning." 

November 17, of this year, stands out as a date long to be remembered in the an- 
nals of our class. It was the date of the first class party, which was held in the basement 
of the Fairchild Hall. Games were played and refreshments served. This party has 
been well termed by many as a "Tropical Blowout." 

Mr. Slentz was elected as the president for the winter term of the Freshman year. 
Soon the class became anxious and repeated the success of the party of the fall term. 

Our Ship of State was guided during the Spring term by A. L. Marble. In the month 
of May the record breaker, so far as attendance goes, in class parties was held. By all 
it was voted as a most enjoyable time. 

After a very successful year we made our way homeward, only to return in a short 
three months, full of enthusiasm for the ensuing year. 

With the idea of improving on the previous year, Mr. W. J. Scanlan was elected 
president for the fall term of the Sophomore year. Since the Sophomores had decided 
to sit in the Pit at chapel, the Frosh decided that they liked the section, so it was with 
severity that "hurt us more than it did the Frosh" we persuaded them that it was a 
reserved section. 

Mr. L. B. Mann was elected to serve as the president for the winter term. Lorenzo, 
an imported product, brought many new ideas from Nebraska, and a very prosperous 
term it was that the class spent under the leadership of this native of Nebraska. 

The Spring term of the year found Willard J. Loomis in the Presidential Chair. 
Since the Right Honorable St. Patrick gave to us March 17 as a holiday, we decided to 
give a party on that day. This party was given in the Y. M. C. A. Building. The room 
was profusely decorated in green drapery and in shamrocks. An in-door track meet, in 
which several promising athletes took part, was held. An ending was brought to the 
evening by the serving of a very sumptuous banquet. 

During the fall term of the Junior year we had as a guide, Mr. F. W. Johnson. 
During this term it was necessary to elect the Class Book manager. After much elec- 
tioneering the class finally elected Willard Loomis as the Manager of the Royal Purple 
for the year of '14-'15. Since then Willard has proven worthy of the trust that was 
bestowed upon him. 

The football team of the Junior year claimed the inter-class championship without 
a single defeat. The members of the team were presented with silver watch fobs as a 
token of appreciation from the class for the fight which they put up. 

The class being a fighter against political pull, showed its spirit by cutting all 
fourth hour classes and bidding Custodian Lewis a good-bye. 

Again we find a new man in the Presidential chair, Mr. W. F. Smith. It was during 
this term that a permanent class History Book was started. A most noteworthy 
occurrence. 

194 




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History of the Glass of ytineteen Hundreo Jiftecn— (Tontinuefc 




The basket-ball season of the year of 1914 was all but a victorious one for the 
Juniors, being second only to the first year men. Thus the year ended with the score 
of 1000 for the Frosh and .666 for the Juniors. 

The largest question before the class for the year was the dance question. On the 
5th of February the class decided to give a dance. It was understood that "Colonel 
Wadley" was to be the chairman of the dance committee. The question was again 
brought up on the 12th of February for a final decision and the annual Spring Dance was 
planned, and as a dance committee F. W. Johnson, M. P. Goudy, Velora Fry, W. N. 
Skourup and Ruth Hill were appointed to carry the plans into effect. They met and 
re-met, only to meet again and to see if the Seniors would gain permission to dance in 
the Gymnasium. However, they were unsuccessful in the attempt. Our ever ambi- 
tious "Shorty" Fowler made a motion that we have a few practice matinee dances; this 
carried and much was the enjoyment that they afforded. 

Mr. W. H. Wilson, the president for the spring term found his hands full with the 
coming of the Junior-Senior Banquet, and the class party. The party was an unusual 
success, a reception being given in the ladies' Gymnasium and later those wishing to 
dance being allowed to wend their way to the Aggieville Hall, where the memorable 
stunt was pulled off, — was the martyr-like expression of "Fat" Hooker, while acting as 
door-keeper. 

On the evening of May 29, 1914, the Junior-Senior Banquet was given. For the 
benefit of those who are in doubt as to just what this occasion might be I beg to submit 
the following definition: Banquet — A social function at which one endures a poor meal 
for the sake of the speaking which is to follow and then endures the poor speaking for the 
sake of politeness. The affair included a reception in the Nicholas Gymnasium, the Junior 
Farce in the Auditorium, and the banquet on the main floor of the Gymnasium. There 
was a large attendance and the committee might well feel much complimented on the 
success of the evening. The committee was composed of L. B. Mann as chairman, Mary 
Gurnea, Louise Walbridge, C. W. Shaver, L. M. Nabours, J. W. Linn and F. M. Layton. 

Mr. Walter Smith acted as the toastmaster for the evening and the following 
speeches were given: 



Address of Welcome 

Response 

Roast to the Juniors 

Toast to the Seniors 

Presentation of Shepherd's Crook 

Acceptance of Shepherd's Crook . 



Mary Inez Mann 

Margaret Blanchard 

Russel Williamson 

. W. H. Wilson 

W.L. Sweet 

W.N. Skourup 



On the morning of June ninth the Juniors had charge of the chapel exercises and held 
a funeral service over the class of 1914. John Hungerford was to have given the address 
but was forcibly detained by the '14s in the basement of the Chemistry Building. The 
'15s finally rescued him and escorted him to the Auditorium where the '14s made an effort 
to keep him from the building but were unsuccessful. The chief results of the scrap were 
the loss of clothing by some of the participants and of the dignity of the '14s engaged in 
the rumpus. During the scrap, however, another speaker was substituted for the one 
that was detained. Don L. Irwin delivered the address and the music was furnished by 
L. B. Mann and M. A. Lindsey. The coffin and the remains were then sorrowfully re- 
moved and the whole cremated, the Juniors in charge. 

Mr. M. P. Goudy held the Presidential Chair during the fall term of the Senior year. 
This year being an important one, it was very necessary that we have a good leader and 
this Goudy proved to be. If there is one thing besides the cat that has nine lives, it is the 
dance question. It came back to us again this year, but there is to be yet the first dance 
on the "Hill." We again contented ourselves with a few matinee dances, the profits 
from which were turned over to the Belgian Fund. 

As usual the Seniors stand for College Spirit as well as for the class spirit. It was de- 
cided to have a section of the seats next to the band reserved for the Seniors at the Okla- 
homa-Aggie Football game. A committee of men all weighing over 180 pounds was ap- 
pointed to guard the section, and it is a point to be observed how much people can shrink 
when the occasion demands. Little "Tubby" Reed was honored as the chairman of this 



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committee. We were much worried at having one so small and inexperienced thus thrust 
out into the stern realities (of the bleachers). But all's well that ends well, and our desire 
to sit apart and ponder on the game was duly respected. 

During the reign of President Goudy one of the most successful class parties ever held 
was enacted on December the fourth, 1914. It was a masquerade affair. All the costumes 
were very attractive in their way but they differed in their way. McClymonds looked 
the veritable Devil and as such he claimed the prize for the men, while Miss Beall as the 
Indian Maiden claimed the honors for the ladies. "Mammy" Hooker and several others 
could well deserve more than honorable mention but we could n< t do so without writing 
a full history of masquerades. 

Mr. W. A. Hagan was president for the winter term of our last year. To Bill Hagan 
the Royal Purple Committee gives the credit of keeping down the false criticism which 
usually falls against the members of the Class Book Committee. Bill being a good helms- 
man always made it a point to put the real workers on his committees and as a result all 
the business of the term was carried off on schedule time. The class during this adminis- 
tration gave no social events due to the fact that there was all together too many other 
matters which kept the class busy. 

Our last term has come all too soon and we have chosen as our last president Don 
L. Irwin. 

We were royally entertained by the Junior Class on the night of May 14, 1915. This 
evening is a bright spot near the close of our College days and as such will never be wiped 
from our memories. 

We have always tried to be an upright class, one which could well be a model for the 
following classes. We have been well represented in literary work and different school 
organizations and to say that we have been represented in athletics is not enough as will 
be understood by naming the following "K" men, who will leave vacant places in the 
teams next year: Burkholder, Fowler, Agnew, Enns, Scanlan, McClymonds, Marble, 
Coxen, Haymaker, Coith, Collins, Bengtson, Smith. 

As we step out into the world it is with the fondest feelings for our Alma Mater, 
where our History worked out so successfully and so pleasantly. 

With greetings to the classes that have gone ahead and to those that follow — 

Good-Bye. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE CLASS OF 1915 



Freshman 
J. W. Linn 
Charles Slentz 
A. L. Marble 



Office 
President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 

Dance 
F. M. Lay ton 
J. D. Hungerford 
Ruth Hill 
W. W. Haggard 
Mary Churchward 

Finance 
F. Stevenson 
C. A. Hooker 
R. T. Wilson 



Sophomore 
W. J. Scanlan 
L. B. Mann 
W. J. Loomis 



Junior 
F. W. Johnson 
W. F. Smith 
W. H. Wilson 



Senior Officers and Committees 



Fall Term 
M. P. Goudy 
W. W. Haggard 
Ruth Hill 
R. C. Erskine 



Winter Term 
W. A. Hagan 
A. W. Aicher 
Jane Kingan 
C. W. Gartrell 



Cap and Gown 
W. H. Wilson 
F. H. Freeto 
Mary Glenn 

Senior Play 
W. F. Smith 
Laura Falkenrich 
J. D. Parsons 
Ruth Hill 
H. S. Coith 



Senior 
M. P. Goudy 
W. A. Hagan 
Don L. Irwin 



Spring Term 
D. L. Irwin 
C. A. Hooker 
Pauline Clarke 
J. D. Parsons 

Commencement Week 
J. W. Linn 

Mildred Hollingsworth 
0. E. Smith 

Memorial 
W. S. Morrow 
F. M. Layton 
O. E. Smith 
Ruth Hill 
Laura Falkenrich 



Announcements 
R. C. Erskine 
J. H. Loomis 
Maurine Allison 



Class Day 
F. W. Johnson 
Clara Willis 
R. A. Shelly 



196 



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Animal Husbandry 



Ruth I. Adams 

Home Economics 




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Eureka 



Manhattan 



Walter B. Adair Ossawatomie 

Animal Husbandry 



Edith L. Alsop 


Manhattan 


General Science 




LeRoy Alt 


Norborne, Mo 


Agronomy 





Bernard M. Anderson Manhattan 
Animal Husbandry 



Alfred C. Apitz 
Agronomy 



Edith E. Arnold 
General Science 



Manhattan 



Manhattan 



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Albert C. Arnold Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 



J. M. Aye Manhattan 

Animal Husbandry 



George M. Arnold 
Agronomy 



Stanley B. Baker 
Architecture 



Lester F. Barnes 
Agronomy 



Piedmont 



Manhattan 



Ralph G. Baker Malta Bend, Mo 
Electrical Engineering 



Anne E. Barnium 
Home Economics 



Henry B. Bayer 

Animal Husbandry 







Orie W. Beeler 

Animal Husbandry 

Ada G. Billings 
Home Economics 




Blanche M. Berger Sylvan Grove 
General Science 



Mankato 



Vermillion 



Morgan T. Binney Kansas City, Mo. 
Horticulture 



Spivey 



Edith A. Boyle 

Home Economics 



Mabel L. Botkin 
Home Economics 



Helen E. Bower 
Home Economics 



Mildred Branson 
Home Economics 



Manhattan 



Lincoln 



Cambridge 



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Amy May Briggs 
Home Economics 



Sedgwick 



Wellington T. Brink Manhattan 
General Science 



Arthur B. Brush 
Animal Husbandry 



William H. Brookover 
Agronomy 



Fannie E. Brooks 
Home Economics 



Margaret I. Bruce 
Home Economics 



Orville B. Burtis 
Animal Husbandry 



Wilma Burtis 

Home Economics 



Newton 



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Antis M. Butcher 
Electrical Engineer 



Omar O. Browning 
Animal Husbandry 



Will R. Bolen 
Agronomy 



William C. Calvert 
Horticulture 





Solomon 



Linwood 



LeRoy 



Kansas City 



George R. Campbell 
Agronomy 

Kim Ak Ching 
Agronomy 



Martha C. Conrad 
Home Economics 



Kathleen L. Conroy 
Home Economics 



Manhattan 



Manhattan 



Manhattan 



Manhattan 



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F. B. Cromer Manhattan 

Animal Husbandry 



J. W. Crumbaker 

Animal Husbandry 



Grace N. Cool 

Home Economics 



Onaga 



Glasco 



George A. Cunningham Cheney 

Electrical Engineering 



Grace L. Curry 

Home Economics 



Manhattan 



Lola Davis Guthrie Center, Iowa 

Home Economics 



Walter E. Deal Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering 



Frank H. Dillenback Manhattan 
Animal Husbandry 



203 





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Florence E. Dodd Langdon, Iowa 
Home Economics 



Leon A. Ek 


McPherson 


Dairy Husbandry 




Faith E. Earnest 


Washington 


Home Economics 




Cecil Elder 


Argonia 


Veterinary 




Frances F. Ewalt 


Manhattan 


Home Economics 





Edwin W. Faulconer Clay Center 
Horticulture 



Luzerne H. Fairchild Manhattan 
Agronomy 



George C. Ferrier 
Architecture 



Osborne 



204 



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Martha F. Faubien Manhattan 

Home Economics 



Gerald W. FitzGerald 

Veterinary Roswell, N. M 



R. I. Fix 



Irl Ferria Fleming Manhattan 

Agronomy 



Claude Fletcher 
Agronomy 



Nell Flinn 

Home Economics 



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Herbert H. Frizzell Cherokee, Okla. 
Animal Husbandry 



Ruth E. Frup m Kansas City 

Home Economics 



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Animal Husbandry 

Elizabeth E. Gish 
Home Economics 



Alma 



Manhattan 



J. L. Garlough 
Agronomy 

Samuel R. Gardner 
Agronomy 



Dorothea P. Gish 
Home Economics 



Louise Greenman 
Home Economics 



Josie M. Griffith 
Home Economics 



Cedarville, Ohio 



Hartford 



Manhattan 



Kansas City 



Manhattan 



Leota Lee Gromer Manhattan 

Home Economics 



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Agronomy 



Hazel K. Groff 
Home Economics 



Esther Gygax 

Home Economics 



Grace Gardner 
Home Economics 



Mary A. Gish 

Home Economics 



Preston Orin Hale 
Animal Husbandry 



Charles T. H albert 

Electrical Engineering 



Edna A. Hawkins 
Home Economics 



Morrowville 



Nortonville 



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Verda Harris 

Home Economics 



William K. Hervey Centralia 

Electrical Engineering 



Marie M. Hellwig 
Home Economics 



Nettie Hendrickson Manhattan 

Home Economics 





Manhattan 



Oswego 



Louis S. Hodgeson Harveyville 

Animal Husbandry 



James Sidney Hagan Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 

A.LTA S. Hepler Manhattan 

Home Economics 



Henry Robert Horak Munden 

Architecture 



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Lydia H. Hokanson 
Home Economics 



Marquette 



Ruth Amelia Hutchings Manhattan 
Home Economics 



Arthur Edward Hopkins 

Electrical Engineer Tonganoxie 



Blanch M. Haggman 
Home Economics 



Agnes McCord Irwin Manhattan 
Home Economics 



Elmer H. Jantz 
Agronomy 



Arlie Noel Johnson 
Electrical Engineer 



Lillian C. Jeter 
Home Economics 



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Fred A. Korsmeier Nevada, Mo. 
Architecture 



Talbot Roy Knowles Manhattan 
Electrical Engineering 



Eldorado 



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Robert R. Lancaster Manhattan 
Animal Husbandry 



Mary Steven Lane 
Home Economics 



Bertha Blanche Lauger Manhattan 
Home Economics 



Eva Myrtle Lawson McPherson 

Home Economics 



Virginia Anne Layton Blue Rapids 
Home Economics 



Paul Revier Lemly Ramona 

Electrical Engineering 



Henry Dall Linscott 
Electrical Engineering 

Reuben Edward Lofinck 

Agronomy Manhattan 



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Claude Ewing Lovett Eureka 

Agronomy 



Mayme Elizabeth Linton Denison 
Home Economics 



Willard Earl Lyness 
Agronomy 



Howard A. Lindsley 
Dairy Husbandry 



Anna May Lorimer 
Home Economics 



M. A. Lindsay 
Agronomy 



James H. McAdams 
Agronomy 



S. R. McArthur 
Veterinary 



Walnut 



Manhattan 



Willis 



Kansas City 



Salina 



Walton 



212 



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Harold Mack McClelland 

General Science Manhattan 



Everett R. McGalliard 
Horticulture 



Paul C. McGilliard 
Agronomy 



Irene M. McElroy 
Home Economics 



Mary E. McKinley 
Home Economics 



Manhattan 



Manhattan 



Albert J. Mangelsdorf Atchison 
Agronomy 



Eugene Martin 

Animal Husbandry 



James R. Mason 
Agronomy 



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Mary Rose Moss 
Home Economics 



Anna Lora Miller 
Home Economics 



Robert F. Mirick 
Civil Engineer 



Cecil F. Miller 
Home Economics 



Eureka 



Hoisington 



Otis 



Hoisington 



Lewis A. Maury San Antonio, Texas 
Animal Husbandry 



Alma Dale Newell Matfield Green 
Home Economics 



Vivian Neiswender 
Home Economics 



Ralph V. O'Neal 

Agronomy 



Tooeka 



Wellsville 



215 




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Walter J. Ott 

Animal Husbandry 



Edward J. Otto 
General Science 



Hazel B. Peck 

Home Economics 



Greenleaf 



Riley 



Manhattan 



Cleda M. Pace Osawatomie 

Home Economics 



Susan R. Paddock Blue Mound 

Home Economics 



•Joseph G. Phinney Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 



Gladys M. Phillips Manhattan 

Home Economies 



Annette W. Perry 
General Science 



Manhattan 



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Edna Pickrell 

Home Economics 



Marie Pickrell 
Home Economics 



Helen M. Pitcairn 
Home Economics 



Eugene F. Pile 
Veterinary 



Cora A. Pitman 

Home Economics 



Mary E. Polson 
Home Economics 



Gouwiney A. Prier 
Home Economics 



Grosvenor W. Putnam 
Horticulture 



Manhattan 



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Mary L. Price 


Winfield 


Home Economics 




Joseph V. Quigley 


Blaine 


Agronomy 




Wayne Ramage 


Arkansas City 


Civil Engineering 





Earl Ramsey Solomon 

Animal Husbandry 



John P. Rathbun Downs 

Electrical Engineering 

Elliott Ranney Manhattan 

General Science 



Frank Richard Rawson Wamego 
Mechanical Engineering 



Benjamin Richards 
General Science 



Delphos 



218 



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James C. Riney 
Horticulture 



Paul Robinson 
Agronomy 



Daniel A. Robbins 

Agronomy 



Juanita Reynolds 
Home Economics 



Nannie C. Ross 

Home Economics 



Grace E. Rudy 

Home Economics 



Warren W. Rutter 

Civil Engineering 



Dorian P. Ricord 

Industrial Journalism 



Pratt 



Oswego 



Colony 



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Ralph P. Ramsey Solomon 

Animal Husbandry 



Florence C. Rothweiler Bison 

Home Economics 



Charles D. Sappin Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 



Evelyn Schriver 
Home Economics 



Halstead 



George M. Schick Plainview, Tex. 
Agronomy 



Pearl E. Schowalter Halstead 

Home Economics 



Margaret U. Schneider Logan 

Home Economics 



Gilbert H. Sechrist Meriden 

Electrical Engineering 



220 



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Mary L. Scott 

Home Economics 



Foster L. Shelley Elmdale 

Mechanical Engineering 



Emmett W. Skinner Manhattan 

Agronomy 



James H. Sharpe Council Grove 

Horticulture 



Guy C. Smith 
Agronomy 



Elbert L. Smith 
Agronomy 



Rudolph E. Stuewe 
Dairy Husbandry 



Mabel C. Sitterly 
Home Economics 



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Jay W. Stratton 
Agronomy 



Harlan R. Sumner 
Agronomy 



Kansas City jE 



Manhattan 



Kate Elizabeth Sumners Riley || 

Home Economics 



Hazel B. St. John Rocky Ford, Colo, p 
Home Economics 



Esther E. St. John Rocky Ford, Colo. 
Home Economics 



Dorothy M. Story 
Home Economics 



Edward L. Shim 
Agronomy 



Manhattan 



Kahulua, H. I. 



Doddridge C. Tate Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 



222 



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Sik Hung Taam Canton, China I 

Animal Husbandry 



Elizabeth E. Taylor 
Home Economics 



Rhoda E. Tharp 
Home Economics 



Rose V. Tipton 

Home Economics 



Eva Esther Townsend 
Home Economics 



Mary L. Taylor 
General Science 



Frank A. Unruh 
Horticulture 



Archie G. Van Horn 
Dairy Husbandry 



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Thomas K. Vincent Kansas City, Mo. 
Mechanical Engineering 



Harry F. Vaupel New Cambria 

General Science 



Clara Willis 

Home Economics 



Mamie B. Wartenbee 
Home Economics 





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Horton 



Liberal 



John H. Welsh Kansas City, Mo. 

Agricultural Engineering 



Edith M. Walsh 
Home Economics 



Manhattan 



Francis Marion Wadley 

Dairy Husbandry Kansas City 



John S. Wood, Jr. Cleveland, Ohio 

Agronomy 



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Ida M. Wilson 

Home Economics 



Clarence B. Williams 
Animal Husbandry 



Leavenworth 



Bigelow 



Lewis A. Williams Sylvan Grove 
Animal Husbandry 



Vera Whitmore 
General Science 



Wayne L. Wilhoite 
Animal Husbandry 



Lois K. Wemmer 
Home Economics 



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Price Harlan Wheeler Garden City 
Agronomy 



Laura Westphall 
Home Economics 



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Clauda B. Wells 


Barnes 


Home. Economics 




Wilton T. White 


Jewell 


Agronomy 




Ray Whitenack 


Manhattan 


Dairy Husbandry 




Florence E. Waynick 


Wellington 


Home Economics 




Edmund F. Wilson 


Kansas City 


Horticulture 




Charles H. Zimmerman 


Stilwell 


Mechanical Engineering 


Lester J. Bell 


Wellsville 


Agronomy 





Hannah Margaret Campbell 

Home Economics Manhattan 



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George W. Christie Manhattan 

Architecture 



William P. Deitz 
Agronomy 



Elsie E. Hart 

Howe Economics 



Robert J. Hannah 
Agronomy 



Overland 



Edgar, Nebr 



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Helen Held 

Home Economics 



Ernest Lawson Manhattan 

Animal Husbandry 



Robert U. McClenahan Manhattan 
General Science 



Ella R. Milton 

Home Economics 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIJIIIIIIIIHII! IIIIIIIIIIIIIINI^ ElllNIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIII IIIIHIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 





Ella Dunlap Phenicie Tonganoxie 
Home Economics 



Nellie Pope Hoxie 

Home Economics 



Paul C. Rawson Wamego 

Mechanical Engineer 

Wilma I. Van Horn Overbrook 

Home Economics 



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Hunior Officers anb (Committees 




W. T. White 
P. H. Wheeler 
O. B. Buitis 
G. C. Ferrier 



Royal Purple Committee 

W. C. Calvert, Chairman 

J. R. Mason T. K. Vincent 

Mildred Branson J. W. Stratton 
Fred Korsmeier Mary Poison 



H. R. Sumner 
Florence Justin 
Eva Lawson 



Junior-Senior Committee 

Geo. C. Ferrier, Chairman 
P. H. Wheeler Wilma Burtis Clauda Wells 

T. K. Vincent John Rathbun F. Korsmeier 

R. V. Adams Stanley Baker 



L. P. Whitehead 
J. L. Garlough 



Officers, Class of 1916 

Spring Term, 19 U Fall Term, 191 J, 

President Preston Hale W. C. Calvert 

Vice-President J. H. McAdams Hazel St. John 

Secretary Laura Lee Setliff Paul Gwin 

Treasurer Earl Ramsey Geo. Ferrier 



Winter Term, 1915 
J. W. Stratton 
W. T. White 
Wilma Burtis 
G. M. Schick 






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Sophomore 




"Subdued and meek as fits ttjeir lowl? station'" 

— Marlowe 




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Henry J. Adams 
Helen Marie Anderson, 
Russel Orville Andruss, 
Madge Gladys Austin, 
Paul Baker, 
Rose Theodora Baker 
Blanche Baird, 
John William Barker, 
John Burton Barnes, 
Mildred G. Barnes, 
Mildred Edith Batchelor, 
Myrtle Ethel Bauerfind, 
Clara Merle Beeman, 
James Glenn Bell, 
Lois Viola Bellomy, 



HOME ADDRESS NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Topeka Martha Estella Blain Manhattan 

Garden City Elizabeth Meris Bousfield, Auburn, Neb. 

Ellsmore Nellie Elizabeth Boyle, Spiney 

Manhattan Mary Josephine Branchette, Jewell 

Manhattan Chas. Russel Braekney, Burlingame 

Topeka Andrew A. Brecheisen, Edgerton 

Valencia Geo. H. Brett, Ponca City, Okla. 

Pratt Curtis Anglo Brewer, Abilene 

Bellaire Luster R. Brooks, Winfield 

Rock Creek William Herbert Brooks, Stafford 

Manhattan May Brookshier, Chillicothe, Mo. 

.,. ,. Chas. C. Brown, Ellsworth 

Minneapolis _, , _ , , ' __ IT t 

Gleah Deborah Brown, Hastings, Neb. 

Topeka Hazgl Elizabeth Brown, Chester, Neb. 

Altoona Helen Mildred Brown, Holton 

Manhattan Wesley Gordon Bruce, New York, N.Y. 




232 



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HOME ADDRESS 



Elizabeth Burnham 
Albert Clarence Bux, 
Evangeline Casto, 
William N. Caton, 
Blanche Clarke, 
Frank Elmer Clark, 
Rachel Clark 
Myrtle Antonio Collins 
Vesta Vine Cool 
Lewie Elvine Crandall 
Blaine Dighton Crow, 
Simon E. Croyle, 
Vilonia Cuttler, 
Frank Ellsworth Dowling, 
Lewis A. Dubbs, 
Hugh Durham, 



Kansas City 

Meriden 

Wellsville 

Winfield 

Eskridge 

Hamilton, Mo. 

Eskridge 

Essex 

Glasco 

Burlington 

Manhattan 

New Cambria 

Anthony 

Chicago, III. 

Ransom 

Randall 



Emma G. Ellersick, 
Roscoe Elliott, 
Emma Junita Engle, 
John Paul Englund, 
William C. Ernsting, 
Rossana Fraquhar, 
Christena Grace Figley, 
Mary Elizabeth Fink, 
Jefferson H. Flora, 
Harve Frank, 
Ira Gordon Freeman, 
William Walter Frizell, 
John Thomas Furneaux, 
Helen Rae Garvie, 
Otto B. Githins, 
George William Givin, 



HOME ADDRESS 

Comstock, Neb. 

Medicine Lodge 

Abilene 

Falun 

Ellinwood 

Manhattan 

Kansas City 

Formosa 

Manhattan 

Jewell 

Ellsworth 

Larned 

Moran 

Abilene 

Republic 

Emporia 




233 



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NAME 

Althan Teresa Goodwyn 
William Rose Gore, 
Stella Jane Gould, 
Clarence Oren Grandfield 
David M. Green, 
William H. Green, 
Edward M. Gregory, 
Benjamin Franklin Griffin, 
Albert William Griffith, 
Gladys Grover 
Charlotte Barrett Hall, 
Lawton M. Hanna, 
Zora Harris, 
May Alma Haymaker, 
Dorothy Louise Heartburg 
Lyman Ray Hiatt, 



HOME ADDRESS 


NAME 


HOME ADDRESS 


Minneapolis 


Frances Hildebrand, 


Coffeyville 


Manhattan 


Olin Arthur Hindman, 


Rush Center 


Wilroads 


Mable Ellen Hinds, 


Manhattan 


, Maize 


Douglas A. Hine, 


Manhattan 


Manhattan 


Arthur J. Hoffman, 


Manhattan 


Olathe 


Henry A. Hoffman, 


Princeton 


Reading 


Madison L. Holroyd, 


Cedarvale 


1, Manhattan 


Anna Howard, 


Manhattan 


Barnard 


F. Wilson Howard, 


Oakley 




Louis E. Howard, 


Manhattan 


Manhattan 


Ellen Elizabeth Howell, 


Garnett 


Clay Center 


Carl F. Huffman, 


Tonganoxie 


Manhattan 


Dwight Hull, 


Wolcott 


Topeka 


James Allison Hull, 


Stafford 


rg Manhattan 


Carl David Hultgrien, 


Topeka 


Esbon 


Wallace Hutchinson, 


Wichita 





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William Hauk, 
Floyd B. Kelly, 
Phillip A. Kennicott, 
Keith Egleton Kenyon, 
Robert Kerr, 
Earl V. Kesinger, 
Marion Belle Keys, 
Glen William Keith, 
Evelyn Nellie Kizer, 
William Klooz, 
Minnie Landsdown, 
Amy Alice Lamberson, 
Charles E. Long, 
Harold William Luhnow, 
Lethe Marshall, 
Newton A. McCosh, 



HOME ADDRESS 

Manhattan 

Kansas City 

Woodbine 

Vernon 

Wakefield 

Greensburg 

Enid, Okla. 

Belleville 

Manhattan 

Kincaid 

Manhattan 

Lyons 

Blue Mound 

Oak Park, III. 

Manhattan 

Longford 



HOME ADDRESS 



Cecil McFadden, 
Beulah L. McNall, 
Agnes Christina Miller, 
Herbert P. Miller, 
Goldie Elizabeth Mitchell, 
Edgar A. Moffat, 
Ben Moore, 
Ralph L. Mosier, 
Laura Mueller, 
Anna Monroe Neer, 
Alfred Nelson, 
Peter L. Netterville, 
Arthur Newkirk, 
Harold G. Newton, 
Mary Francis Nicolay, 
Lettie Maybelle Noyce 



Stafford 

Gaylord 

Udall 

Kansas City 

Brookville 

Great Bend 

Manhattan 

Muskogee, Okla. 

Wichita 

Cambridge 

Paola 

Manhattan 

Geneseo 

Manhattan 

Manhattan 

Stockton 



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235 



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NAME 

Helen Fay Okeson, 
Russel Harry Oliver, 
Howard Walter Orr, 
Robert Osborne, 
Ross Palenska, 
Edith Parkhurst, 
William E. Patterson, 
Vera Peake, 
Clara Viola Peterson, 
Thomas E. Pexton, 
William F. Pickett, 
Alma Luella Pile, 
Nina Mae Powell, 
Jessie Fern Preston, 
David M. Purdy, 
Laura Mary Ramsey, 



HOME ADDRESS 

Fairview 

Oxford 

Topeka 

Wichita 

Alma 

Kinsley 

Yates Center 

Belleville 

Essex, Iowa 

Manhattan 

Manhattan 

Arkalon 

Athol 

Wichita 

Manhattan 

Topeka 



NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Frank I. Reynolds, Mulvane 

George W. Rhine, Manhattan 

Lyle V. Rhine, Manhattan 

Mildred Robinson, Salina 

Fern M. Roderick, Attica 

Bertha Katherine Root, Brookville 

Oliver K. Rumble, Moran 

Clarence Seeber, Great Bend 

Gale Alfred Sellers, Great Bend 
John Sellon, Kansas City, Mo. 

Harry Weher Shapper, Mulvane 
Sam C. Sherwood, Excelsior Springs.Mo. 

Simon P. Shields, Lost Springs 

Theodore Legrande Shuart Hutchinson 

Georgia Yanders Sloan, Beloit 

Mary Stevenson, Paola 



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NAME 



HOME ADDRESS 



Ellen Delpha Speiser, 
Alice Mae Sweet, 
Franc M. Sweet, 
Joseph Burton Sweet, 
Edith A. Tempero, 
Madge Rector Thompson, 
Magdeline Florence Thomp 
Peter G. Toews, 
Lesley I. Tubbs, 
Frank Sumner Turner, 
Adelaide Updegraph, 
O. Walker, 

Frances Josephine Walsh, 
Charlotte Pearl Wartenbee, 
Mary Elizabeth Weible, 
Jay Roy Wood, 



Garnett 

Burlington 

Manhattan 

Manhattan 

Clay Center 

Hill City 

son, Alma 

Newton 

Gladi 

Tonganoxie 

Maple Hill 

Beliot 

Clay Center 

Liberal 

Topeka 

Manhattan 



Name 

J. W. Worthington, 
Fay Emma Wright, 
Wilbur W. Wright, 
William A. Wunsch, 
Henry H. Zimmerman, 
Louis A. Zimmerman, 
William T. Douglas, 
A. Earl Dyatt, 
Howard C. Edwards, 
Robert J. Fisher, 
William L. Farnsworth 
Leon B. Garver, 
Carl Hedstrome, 
Mabel D. Howard, 
Lea N. Jewitt, 
Esther Kregar, 



HOME ADDRESS 









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Manhattan 

Muskogee, Okla. 

Newton 

Argonia 

Belle Plaine 

Belle Plaine 

Jewell City 

Almena 

Jewell City 

Liberal 

Portis 

Erie 

Dinas 

Cottonwood Falls 



Junction City 




NAME 


HOME ADDRESS 


Mabel Howard, 


Cottonwood Falls 


Emily Lofinck, 


Manhattan 


Agnes McCorkle, 


Holton 


Loren Lupfer, 


Larned 


Clarence Rude, 




Harold Snell, 


Douglas 


Charles D. Thomas, 


Bazter Springs 


J. A. Novak, 


Ellsworth 





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Officers of tbe <Z lass of 1917 



Spring Term, 191 U 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary .... 
Treasurer 
Marshal 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Marshal 



Fall Term, 191 It 



Henry J. Adams 

Laura Ramsey 

Stella Gould 

Lyle V. Rhine 

Herbert Miller 



Arthur Newkirk 

Madge Thompson 

Christina Figley 

Helen Garvie 

Thomas Pexton 




239 




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Officers of tl)e Class of 1917 



(Continued) 



Winter Term, 1915 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Marshal 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary ... 
Treasurer... 
Marshal 



Stella Gould 

Martha Blain 

Mary Weible 

Madge Thompson 

Bertha Root 



Spring Term, 1915 



Henry Hoffman 

Mae Sweet 

Laura Mueller 

J. B. Barnes 

D. A. Hine 




240 









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Truman 



A rigl)t 3\oval welcome to ?ou all ' 

— Shakespeare. 





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(tlassof 1918 



Motto— "Let Service Be Our Aim." 
Class Colors — Blue and Gold. 

IN THE Fall of 1914 there came to the Kansas State Agricultural College the jovial 
and enthusiastic Freshman class. To this ambitious and energetic throng the gates 
of the College were widely thrown open and even upon the faces of the austere 
faculty, welcome was written. At once the class set out to win the good will of every 
teacher as well as student, and it succeeded. When in later years these lines are pe- 
rused, let the memory of this good will help every one to hold it. 

The '18s have already taken an active part in various student activities. A great 
cement K is planned to be erected on the heights of Prospect and will probably be in 
position by next fall. 

The freshman football team captained by George Hewey has proven to everyone 
after winning the championship that in a few years K. S. A. C. will have a record team. 
Just as active a part has been taken in basket-ball. We are proud of these men who are 
representing the freshman athletics and their future promises to help the class make 
this great College greater. 

The social events of the class are two in number. In the fall one hundred and fifty 
freshmen hiked to Wildcat and the memory of this enjoyable entertainment will remain 
with us for no short time. In the winter term the customary class party was held in 
the Nichols Gymnasium, and was a complete success; perhaps the most memorable 
features being the informality of the party and the generous refreshments. 

The far-seeing eye might discern from day to day, forms, hurrying to and fro upon 
the campus, ever bent upon receiving at the end of the four short years the laurels which 
are due. 

This simple account is given to remind the readers that the Spirit of K. S. A. C. 
will not leave with the senior class of 1915, but will remain during the three untarnished 
years that lie before us. May they ever be bright. 




242 



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Officers 1915 







Fall Term 




President 




Zeno Rechel 


Vice-President 




Dorothy Norris 


Secretary 




Claudine Rathman 


Treasurer 




F. H. Gulick 




Winter Term 

President F. H. Gulick 

Vice-President G. R. Hewey 

Secretary Marie Johnston 

Treasurer D. W. Woolley 

243 



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A RGUEMENT 15 - 



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Guy S. Lowman 



Guy S. Lowman, director of athletics at the Kansas State Agricultural College, is 
a graduate of the Springfield Y. M. C. A. Training School of Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he specialized in football and baseball. Following three years as athletic director 
of the University of Louisiana, Professor Lowman assisted in the department of athletics 
at the University of Missouri where he had charge of the baseball and the basket-ball 
teams and assisted "Bill" Roper, the famous ex-Princeton mentor to turn out one of 
the first Tiger teams to trounce the Jayhawkers effectively. 

Professor Lowman has been overworked while at Manhattan. During the first 
two seasons he coached everything except track and also directed the department of 
physical training. 

Coupled with the task of arranging the schedule for the various teams and attempt- 
ing to make them pay out, Professor Lowman has more than had his hands full of trouble. 
Following the 1914 football season Lowman resigned as coach of football and a new face 
will be seen in the 1915 coaching staff next fall. Lowman now has complete charge of 
the athletic department and coaches baseball. 



245 



■■!'r" I :■■■■■: :-■-■:-■- TT ? If T1 1 " ■ 




Carl J. Merner 



Carl J. Merner, assistant coach of Varsity teams and specialist in basket-ball and 
track is also a graduate of the Springfield Y. M. C. A. Training School where he made a 
mark for himself as being the most adaptable athlete ever enrolled. Besides being an 
able athlete, Merner has a splendid line of personality and pep and gets away good with 
his men. He received his early schooling at the Cedar-Falls Teachers College of Cedar 
Falls, Iowa, where, when he graduated, the President stated that he was the best all- 
around athlete ever turned out of the school. 

Merner has done wonderful work, considering the material with his basket-ball and 
track teams during the past two seasons. In basket-ball the Aggies have ranked higher 
than third in the conference each year and this season's track team, topping out the 
season with a win over the Jayhawker in his lair, bids fair to rank high in the Champion- 
ships at Columbia. 



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jFootball 

" Don't flinct), don't foul, bit H)^ line t)ar^-" 

— Theodore Roosevelt. 




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247 



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Tootball 




LACK of material was the greatest hindrance during the 1914 football season. 
Beginning with the ends and drifting back to the pilots Coach Lowman was con- 
tinually in hot water keeping enough fighters in the lineup. The schedule was too 
heavy for the team and also for the fans judging from the brand of support the team 
received. 

The Aggies found the initial game with Southwestern an easy affair and played 
well against the Normals, holding the Emporians to a scoreless tie in the best played 
game of the year. The Cornhusker and Sooner battles were acknowledged defeats 
before the teams hit the field but the Kansas and Missouri games worked surprises. 
The scores in each of these contests would have been different had the line given better 
support to the backfield. The Washburn contest was peculiar in that it served as an 
actual example of the breaks in luck in athletics. 

The team lacked an individual star, a man who could be rushed into the battle 
when the crucial moment was at hand and who could be relied upon to deliver the 
goods. As a whole the team worked well, but disastrous individual weakness arose at 
critical moments with ruinous results to the win column. 

Season's Results 
Games at Home 



October 3 Aggies 

October 10 Aggies 

October 17 Aggies 

November 14 Aggies 

November 25 Aggies. 



October 
October 

Totals, 



24 Aggies 
31 Aggies 

Aggies 



15 Southwestern College 
Kansas State Normals 
University of Nebraska 

10 University of Oklahoma 

16 Washburn College 

Games Abroad 

University of Kansas 

3 University of Missouri 

44 Opponents 







31 

52 

26 



27 
13 

149 




248 



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Varsity 1914 





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^personnel of tl)e 1914 football Oeam 



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OFFICERS 




Merrill Agnew 




Captain 


Emmett Warren Skinner 


Captain-Elect 


Guy S. Lowman 




Head Coach 


Carl J. Merner 




, . . Assistant Coach 


Percy Burkholder 




Assistant Coach 


Leonard Frank 




Assistant Coach 




TEAM 




Merrill Agnew 




Halfback 


Emmett Warren Skinner 


End 


Nicholas Enns 




Halfback 


Henly Haymaker 




Quarterback 


Frank Haucke 




Fullback 


Fred Hartwig 




Fullback 


Bert Barnes 




Halfback 


Marshall Wilder 




End 


Earl Briney 




Tackle 


Lawrence Bernard 




End 


Archie Marble 




Tackle 


Henry Bayer 




Guard 


Wilbur Wright 




Guard 


Will Scanlan 




Center 


Harry Coxen 




Center 




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"Red" Agnew captained the 1915 football team 
and played half and quarter. His work although never 
sensational was of the peppiest sort and his fight was 
enough for many ordinary players. The best that can 
be said is that the 1915 team will miss him sadly. 



Emmett Warren Skinner played end on the '14 Var- 
sity and played so well that the gang elected him captain of 
the '15 team. Skinner never quit and always ran through 
and knocked a man down, which is something more than 
some players accomplished. 





Nicholas Enns played in the backfield and used his 
speed and fight to good advantage until superior weight 
began to tell and the football boss rushed someone from the 
sidelines, to, the rescue. "Nick" ended his football career 
against Washburn. 



251 



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3 



"Hen" Haymaker played quarter on the team for a 
second season and showed marked improvement over his 
work in the preceding year. His work around the ends was 
probably the best in his style of play. 





"Chief" Haucke was the ideal full- 
back of the lot. His knee-action spoke 
for better gains than he usually drew but 
some of this could be laid to the line for 
not opening the holes. "Chief" has one 
more year. 



"Fritz" Hartwig became infected with typhoid fever 
near the end of the season and the team lost one of the 
hardest fighting backfielders of the squad. Hartwig usually 
managed to make a gain no matter how rough the going. 
He has one more year. 





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Bert Barnes with another year's ex- 
perience will make one of the best half 
backs the Varsity has had in years . His 
build and speed made him worthy of the 
letter. 




I 



Marshall Wilder played the first football of his life 
on last fall's team and made good at an end job. His work 
did not look promising until near the end of the season 
when he played in demoniacal fashion. 






Earl Briney won his first foot- 
ball letter playing substitute tackle 
and guard. At Missouri he re- 
placed Marble and did effective 
work with his weight and speed 
and fight combined. 



253 



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Lawrence Bernard also won his 
first football letter on last fall's team. 
Bernard played an end and was particu- 
larly good on getting down under punts 
and spoiling the return. 





Archie Marble's weight should 
have made him the best tackle in 
the Valley but he lacked the fight 
on the defense although he proved 
a mighty good ground-gainer on 
offense. Marble's football career 
ended with the Washburn battle. 



Henry Bayer played tackle, 
guard, and center at different 
times during the '15 season and 
he made his best showing from the 
guard berth. Bayer played his 
first season and will make a val- 
uable lineman for next fall's coach. 




254 




Wilbur Wright, probably better known as "Ras- 
tus," played center, tackle, guard, in fact any old 
place in the center of the line and played it well. His 
best work was from the tackle position. He has one 
more year coming to him, according to Valley rules. 



"Bill" Scanlan's weight made him in- 
valuable from a tackle position although like 
Burkholder of the year before, he was troubled 
by weak ankles. Scanlan was known and 
feared as the hardest fighter in the line. 





Harry Coxen played the center 
position for the '15 team in masterful 
style. His passing offensively was the 
best of any of the pivot men. On the 
defense Harry did much good work 
throughout the season. 



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Freshmen Varsity 1914 




Arthur Burkholder 
Coach, Freshman Varsity, 1914 



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basket !ftall 



"Me tljat wrestles will) us strengthens our nerves, 
emb sharpens our skill." 

Our antagonist is our \)<z[f><zv." 

— Burke 




259 



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THE 1915 basket-ball season gave the Aggie indoor-sport fans many good and ex- 
citing eye-feasts but very little to crow about as wins go. Two-thirds of the 
eighteen contests permitted by the Conference were shunted into the lost column 
and six battles resulted in victories. The Aggies for a second year in succession spoiled 
the Jayhawkers' ever-victorious hopes by winning the only game lost by that team 
throughout the entire season. 

The proteges of Carl J. Merner were handicapped at the post by lack of size and 
weight. Throughout the entire season no team as light in weight was met. This 
proved fatal in many of the games played as the larger teams simply wore the lighter 
Aggies down and administered the final punch of defeat. 

Captain Eddell C. Jones proved one of the best defensive players in the Con- 
ference and was ably seconded in the back-field by Ramsey and MacMillan, each of 
whom played his first year. Leonard and Mcllrath met the best crop of pivot material 
the Valley has raised in many seasons and gained honors. Captain-elect Adams, Bengs- 
ton, and Reynolds, performed well in the forward positions throughout the season but 
the team lacked a real individual goal-shooting star. 

SEASON'S RESULTS 

Aggies 45 Bethany College 24 

Aggies 26 Washburn College 23 

Aggies 19 University of Nebraska 26 

Aggies 20 University of Nebraska 26 

Aggies 22 University of Kansas 38 

Aggies 32 University of Kansas 36 

Aggies 35 University of Washington 12 

Aggies 46 University of Washington 18 

Aggies 21 University of Kansas. 18 

Aggies 20 University of Kansas 39 

Aggies . 16 University of Missouri 26 

Aggies 19 University of Missouri 21 

Aggies 26 St. Mary's College ....... 28 

Aggies 14 Ames Aggies 15 

Aggies 19 Ames Aggies 22 

Aggies 28 University of Missouri ..... 18 

Aggies . 15 University of Missouri 32 

Aggies ...... 27 Washburn College 48 

Total, 450 Total, 380 

260 



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Varsity 1915 



261 





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^personnel of tl)e 
1915 basketball Oeam 



OFFICERS 

Eddell C. Jones Captain 

Raymond V. Adams Captain-elect 

Carl J. Merner Coach 

David R. Shtjll Assistant Coach 

TEAM 

Eddell C. Jones Guard 

Raymond V. Adams Forward 

Roscoe MacMillan Guard 

Earl Ramsey Guard 

J. E. Bengston Forward 

Frank Reynolds Forward 

Wallace Mcllrath Center 

Lawrence Leonard Center 



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Eddell C. Jones captained the 1915 Aggie basket-ball 
team and played one of the best guards in the Conference. 
His free-throwing featured several of the earlier games 
of the season. Jones was always the most aggressive 
man on the team and fought every team to the last 
ditch. The 1915 season ended Jones' time. 



R. V. Adams, captain-elect of the 1916 basket-ball 
team, played his second season. Although he was 
not in all of the games of the schedule Adams played 
well at the close, fighting his best in the two Missouri 
battles on Nichols. 




Earl Ramsey won his K for the first time as a utility 
backfielder. Ramsey was always ready to mix with any op- 
ponent and followed the play well although he did fail many 
times at shots from the floor. 



263 



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J. E. Bengston was one of the coolest players on the 
team and one of the most trustworthy. The "Swede" 
was long on team-work and was one of the best shots 
on the squad. He has one more year of Valley com- 
petition. 




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Frank Reynolds played his first year and played 
it well. He was easily the hardest player on the team. 
His shooting was usually unerring and his head always 
cool yet full of the old fight. 



Roscoe MacMillan romped right along on Jones' 
heels for honors as first guard. His work as defensive 
guard featured the play of the Aggie five throughout 
the season. "Mac" has two more years of Valley time. 




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Wallace McIlrath played his second season on the Aggie 
team at center and guard. "Mac" proved a good jumper and 
followed the play well. At guard he looked particularly good. 



Lawrence Leonard, the Wamego shadow, played his 
second season in the center position. Leonard shot the ball 
well all season which in addition to nice aerial work made him 
first center. 




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baseball 



"3'U catct) U ere it come to ground." 

— Shakespeare 





267 



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baseball 




THE 1914 baseball nine won four Missouri Valley contests and ties with the Uni- 
versity of Missouri team in the fifth of a schedule of ten games with the Conference 
members. The most noteworthy performances of the season were the two suc- 
cessive victories over the University of Kansas team in the final games of the season on 
College Field. Neither of K. U.'s crack pitchers, Smee nor Bishop, could stop the 
slugging Aggies, and Kansas dropped the series, 4 to 1, and 6 to 0. 

"Bill" Bailey, Hodgson, and Sullivan, did the box work for the Lowman help; 
Hodgson working in the larger number of the games with good success. Bailey's work 
was injured at the start of the season by a severe attack of mumps, the ailment weaken- 
ing the Aggie heaver's work throughout the entire season. At the close of the schedule, 
however, Bailey was awarded the silver baseball emblematic of the best pitching record 
of the season. 

Captain-elect Briney's stick work earned him the silver bat his percentage at the 
close of the season being .265. "Red" Agnew's work at second proved good throughout 
the season and labeled the Smith Center player the best "form" exponent of the game on 
the team. At the beginning of the season Coach Lowman experienced considerable 
difficulty with his help at the third station. The shift of Briney to third and McCly- 
monds to short developed to be the right combination. 



SEASON'S RESULTS 



Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 
Aggies 



3 
1 
1 
2 
3 

12 

3 

13 




Total, 



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University of Missouri 
University of Missouri 
Chinese University 
Bethany College 
Kansas State Normal 
Haskell Indians 
University of Kansas 
University of Kansas 
Washburn College 
University of Missouri 
University of Missouri 
Washburn College 
St. Marys College 
Washington University 
Washington University 
St. Marys College 
University of Kansas 
University of Kansas 

Alumni 

Total, 
268 



7 
5 
7 

4 
3 
6 
5 

9 

2 (14 innings) 
7 (12 innings) 
4 
2 
2 
3 
1 

1 
68 




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Varsity 1914 



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personnel of tl)e 
1914 baseball Z3eam 



OFFICERS 




Nicholas Enns 


Captain 


Earl B. Briney 


Captain-elect 


Guy S. Lowman 


Coach 


TEAM 




Merrill Agnew 


Second Base 


Earl Briney 


Third Base 


W. H. Broddle 


Left Field 


George Bailey 


Pitcher 


Nicholas Enns 


Center Field 


L. S. Hodgson 


Pitcher 


Carl Knaus 


First Base 


A. E. McClymonds .. 


Shortstop 


M. Meldrum 


Right Field 


C. F. Nearman 


Utility 


F. P. Sullivan 


Pitcher 


W. Scanlan... 


Catcher 



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Carl Knaus held down the first station successfully 
throughout the season. His best work was dragging in 
the poor pegs and he also hit the ball well in the pinches. 
Knaus completed his three years last season. 



A. E. McClymonds earned the shortstopping job 
after the season was well under way. His playing was 
never sensational and not wholly free from boots but 
always he was out there taking chances. 





"Mike" Meldrum was the heaviest hitter among the 
outfielders that is when he hit 'em at all, and "Mike" 
could paste some of those old hooks to the far side of the 
freshman field. "Mike" graduated last spring. 



271 



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"Lefty" Nearman played as neat a game in the field 
as anyone and was dangerous with the club. Lowman 
used the diminutive Oklahoman as utility player through- 
out the entire season. 



F. P. Sullivan pitched some mighty good ball for 
the Lowman team last spring and everyone was glad to 
see "Sully" draw his letter after his three years of faith- 
ful preliminary work. 




"Bill" Scanlan worked behind the plate for the 
Lowman help and held a pretty hefty peg secondward 
throughout the entire season. "Bill" used good head- 
work on opposing batters but owing to his weight was a 
trifle slow on the path. 



272 



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"Red" Agnew displayed more real baseball "form" 
than any man seen in action on College Field last season. 
His hitting was the only drawback in the path of a "big 
time" future. Last year was his second. 



9* 




■ 



"Cap" Briney's chief delight was pegging the runner 
out at first by inches and worrying the "umps" to dis- 
traction guessing 'em that close. Briney played third 
and hit the ball .265 gaining the silver bat. He also 
played his second season. 





"Stubby" Broddle was the runt lead-off guy for 
the help. His work in the field looked well and he 
handled the clubs in nice style. Broddle is now playing 
his second season. 



273 



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"Bill" Bailey was Lowman's iron-man from the 
1913 season but the mumps hit "Bill" amidships early in 
'14 and relieved him of some mighty good pitching stuff. 
At that he proved equal to all and gained the silver 
baseball. He completed his time last year. 





"Nick" Enns captained the 1914 crew and played 
center gardener in each little nine act drama or farce 
whichever happened to come, but the beauty of it all was 
that the Russian got away with the goods. "Nick" is 
now playing his last show in Varsity athletics. 



"Hoddy" Hodgson loomed up as the nearest rival of 
the Iron Man Bailey. "Hoddy" is a great thinker and 
plays the game according to his own ideas to a great 
extent. Last season was his first on the team. 




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Freshman Varsity 1914 




H. O. Dresser 
Coach, Freshman Varsity, 1914 

277 



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OracK 

3 see ?ou stanfc like gre?l)0un6s in 
tl)c slips straining upon the start." 



-Shakespeare 




279 



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THE 1914 track team was one of the most successful aggregations of runners and field 
athletes ever assembled under the College colors. Not until the outdoor season 
arrived did the team begin to show its real metal. Welsh, Frizzell, and Young, 
created new records in the hurdles, high jump, and pole vaulting events. 

The first meet of the season was against Kansas at Lawrence indoors, and the Aggies 
with an untried team failed to show to advantage. Beginning the outdoor season with 
the University of Oklahoma team at Norman, the Merner athletes performed well, 
holding the Sooners to a 53 to 48 point win. On the following week-end the University 
of Kansas again took the outdoor tussle by a big count and on the next Saturday the 
Aggies came back and forced the University of Missouri to win the relay to take the meet. 
The Kansas State Normals lost a one-sided affair to the Aggies at Emporia and the Mis- 
souri Valley meet at St. Louis, May 30, closed the season. 

SEASON'S RESULTS 

1914 ~Dual OracK an6 TField fleets 

Kniversit? of lHansas vs. Hiansas "Aggies 

(INDOOR) 



Event First Second 

35-yard dash Helt (A) O'Neil (K) 

1-mile run Edwards (K) Poos (K) 

35-yard high hurdles Hazen (K) Perry (K) 

35-yard low hurdles Hazen (K) Vandenberg (A) 

440-yard run Henderson (K) Elswick (K) 

880-yard run Fiske (K) Teeter (A) 

2-mile run Malcomson (K) Teeter (A) 

16-lap relay Won by Kansas 

High jump Frizzel (A) Hazen (K) 

Pole vault Young (A) Pauly (K) 

Shot put Reber (K) Marble (A) 

Final score: University of Kansas, 61; Aggies, 24. 

280 



Record 

3 4/5 seconds 
5 minutes 

4 2/5 seconds 

4 seconds 

57 2/5 seconds 

2 min. 11 sec. 

10 min. 31 3/5 sec. 

3 min. 15 sec. 

5 feet 8 Yi inches 
10 feet 6 inches 
39 feet 10 inches 



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ICniversttv of Oklahoma vs. Ufattsas Aggies 

(OUTDOOR) 



Event 
100-yard dash 
Mile run 
220-yard dash. 

Discus 

Pole vault Young (A) 

220-yard low hurdles Jacobs (O) 
120-yard high hurdles Jacobs (0) 

Shot put Snyder (0) 

440-yard run Hanson (O) 

High jump Woods (0) 

880-yard run Fields (O) 

Broad jump Jacobs (O) 

Relay 

Final score: 



First Second 

Lowry (0) Helt (A) 

Fields (0) Teeter (A) 

Lowry (0) Helt (A) 

Smith (A) Marble (A) 

Washington (A) 

Welsh (A) 

Welsh (A) 

Smith (A) 

Coith (A) 

Frizzell (A) 

Hanson (O) 

Helt (A) 
Won by Kansas Aggies (Collins, Lovett, 

McGilliard, Coith) 3 minutes 33 4/5 sec 

University of Oklahoma, 53; Kansas Aggies, 48. 



Record 
10 1/5 seconds 

4 min. 35 3/5 sec. 
23 seconds 

110 feet 
10 feet 6 inches 
25 2/5 seconds 
16 1/5 seconds 
39 feet 1 inch 
51 1/5 seconds 

5 feet 11 H inches 
2 minutes 3 3/5 sec. 

21 feet 11 3/8 in. 



Hiansas State ^tormals vs. Hiarisas ^Aggies 

(OUTDOOR) 

Event First Second Record 

100-yard dash Helt (A) Nichols (N) 10 4/5 seconds 

Mile run Collins (A) Gamble (N) 4 min. 39 1/5 sec. 

440-yard run Coith (A) Nichols (N) 53 seconds 

Shot put Smith (A) Marble (A) 39 feet 1/4 inch 

220-yard low hurdles Welsh (A) Vandenberg (A) 28 seconds 

Pole vault Young (A) and Washington (A) tied for 

first 10 feet 

880-yard run Bollin (N) Schneider (A) 2 min. 4 3/5 sec. 

Discus Hartwig (N) Smith (A) 114 feet 10 inches 

220-yard run Helt (A) Roy (N) 23 4/5 seconds 

2-mile run Teeter (A) Riley (N) 9 min. 56 sec. 

Broad jump Helt (A) Hartwig (N) 21 feet 10 J^ inches 

High jump Frizzell (A) Hartwig (N) 5 feet 8 inches 

Mile relay Won by Kansas Aggies (Collins, Mc- 
Gilliard, Lovett, Coith) but forfeited 
to Normals through alleged foul; time 3 min. 36 4/5 sec. 
Final score: Kansas Aggies, 73; Kansas State Normals, 36. 

281 

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Knivcrsitj of Hiansas vs. Hiansas .Aggies 




(OUTDOOR) 



Event 
100-yard dash 
Mile run 

120-yard high hurdles 
440-yard run 
220-yard low hurdles 
220-yard dash 

2-mile run 
880-yard run 
Pole vault 

Discus 
High jump 



Shot put 
Broad jump 
Mile relay 



First 
O'Niel (K) 
Edwards (K) 
Hazen (K) 
Coith (A) 
Hazen (K) 
Helt (A) 
Teeter (A) 
Fiske (K) 
Young (A) 

Reber (K) 

Frizzell (A) 

Hazen (K) 

McKay (K) 

Reber (K) 

Helt (A) 

Won by University 



Second 
Hilton (K) 
Collins (A) 
Perry (K) 
Cissna (K) 
Perry (K) 
Hilton (K) 
Malcomson (K) 
Creighton (K) 
Washington (A) and 
Campbell (K) 
Smith (A) 



Record 
10 3/5 seconds 

4 min. 37 2/5 sec. 
16 seconds 
52 1/5 seconds 
27 2/5 seconds 
23 1/5 seconds 

9 min. 57 sec. 

2 min. 2 4/5 sec. 

10 feet 
115 feet 314 inches 



Keeling (K) 
Hazen (K) 
of Kansas 



5 feet 8 1/4 inches 
41 feet 11 Yi inches 
21 feet 10 y 2 inches 

3 min. 30 1/5 sec. 



Final score: University of Kansas, 75; Kansas Aggies, 34. 



ICniversttv of ^ttissouri vs. IKansas Aggies 

Event First Second Record 

100-yard dash Moore (M) Helt (A) 10 2/5 seconds 

Mile run Collins (A) Hogan (M) 4 min. 42 1/5 sec 

120-yard high hurdles Welsh (A) Groves (M) 15 4/5 seconds 

440-yard dash Coith (A) Hutsell (M) 52 1/5 seconds 

Discus Thatcher (M) Drumm (M) 130 feet 4 inches 

220-yard low hurdles Welsh (A) Groves (M) 26 1/5 seconds 

Pole vault Floyd (M) and Murphy (M) tied for first 10 feet 10 inches 

880-yard run Murphy (M) L. Collins (A) 2 min. 4 sec. 

220-yard dash Helt (A) Moore (M) 23 seconds 

2-mile run Moss (M) Teeter (A) 10 minutes 

High jump Frizzell (A) Johnston (M) 5 ft. 9 3/4 in. 

Broad jump Helt (A) Vandenberg (A) 21 ft. 10 }4 in. 

Mile relay Won by Missouri (Porter, Hutsell, Mur- 

phy, Magee); time 3 min. 30 sec. 

282 

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Jpersottnell of tV>e 19 1 4 Orach. Oeam 





OFFICERS 




H. S. Collins 




Captain 


H. S. Coith 




Captain-elect 


Carl J. Merner 




Coach 



TEAM 



W. H. Washington 
S. R. Vandenberg 
H. H. Frizzell 
L. I. Collins 
J. Welsh 
H. Young 
H. S. Collins 
C. E. Lovett ... 

Archie Marble 

P. R. Helt 

H. S. Coith 

P. C. McGilliard 

L. C. Teeter 

E. H. Smith 



Pole vault 

Hurdles and broad jump 

Hurdles and high jump 

Relay and quarter 

Hurdles 

Pole vault 

Mile 

Quarter 

Weights 

Sprints and broad jump 

. . Quarter 

Quarter 

Distance 

Weights 



284 




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W. H. Washington won his first track letter last 
season competing in the pole vault. Washington and 
Young tied for first and second at Oklahoma _, and 
Emporia. 



"Sid" Vandbnberg pulled off the heroic stunt when he 
came back in the Missouri-Aggie dual meet after picking up 
an arm-full of cinders on a fall over a hurdle and won second 
in the broad jump. Last year was his first in Conference 
competition. 





"Duroc" Frizzell, the Oklahoma kangaroo, broke 
the high jump record in the Missouri meet setting the 
new one at 5 feet 9 3/4 inches. "Duroc" is developing 
into a mighty good hurdler this year, too. He has two 
more years of Valley competition. 



285 



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L. I. Collins proved a good stepper going into the Mis- 
souri meet and pulling down second in the 880 although his 
regular run was over the 440 distance. Collins completed his 
time last year. 




John Welsh did himself up famous by establishing two 
new Aggie records for the hurdles when he defeated Groves, 
the Missouri crack in the Missouri-Aggie dual meet. The 
times were: 15 4/5 seconds for the highs, and 26 2/5 for the low 
barriers. 



"Cap" Collins worked in the distances with best results 
over the mile course. He won the mile in the Missouri meet 
and also ran mighty well in the Normal dual contest. This 
year is his last on the team. 





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C. E. Lovett ran in the relay and in the 440 track event. 
His work as second and third installment man in the relay was 
best. Last year was his first on the team. 



Archie Marble proved a better indoor shot putter 
than outdoor, as he never passed his mark of 39 feet 6 
inches made indoors against Kansas. He also came up 
well on the discus taking second in the Oklahoma 
meet. He is now completing his third year on the team. 



Y \ 





Howard Young established a record of 10 feet 7 inches in 
the pole vault against Nebraska Wesleyan in 1912 and the 
mark stood until the winter term of 1915 when Edwards ad- 
vanced it four inches. Young completed his time last year. 



287 



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Paul Helt was a better broad jumper than sprinter. In 
four consecutive dual meets he hit 21 feet 10 '^ inches and in 
the latter three won first place. Helt leaped better than 22 
feet in the Missouri Valley meet for third place. Last year 
was his first on the team but he failed to return to College. 





"Hub" Coith developed into a speedy quarter miler and 
ran his best race against Hutsell of Missouri in the Missouri- 
Aggie dual meet on College Field last spring. The track men 
elected "Hub" to fill the vacancy when Helt failed to return 
to College. 



P. C. McGilliard worked in the relay during his first year 
on Varsity track and made good time in every race. This 
season the crop of 440 men is over-balanced, so the track boss 
is working "Mac" on the hurdles. 




288 



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L. C. Teeter surprised everyone by dropping the two-mile 
record below the 10-minute mark. In the dual meet at Em- 
poria the Wamego rabbit made the distance in 9:56 running a 
lap ahead of the Normalite. He is now working out his second 
letter. 





E. H. Smith made his second letter ;in the weight 
events. Smith's sore spot for the season was the Emporia 
meet where he claims he was gyped out of first in the 
discus. 



289 



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Freshman Varsity 1914 



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Senior Baseball 
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Sophomore Baseball 




Sophomore Track 
297 



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Cadet Officers 
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Ol)e }\ifle (Tlub 



RIFLE shooting at K. S. A. C. dates from the opening of the school year of 1913, 
when Lieutenant Roy A. Hill, Commandant of Cadets, called for men to organize 
a rifle club and enter a team in the inter-collegiate matches. One hundred and 
forty men responded to the call and a club was organized and admitted to the National 
Rifle Association of America and an indoor team entered into the Indoor Matches. 

After a few weeks practice under the able coaching of Lieutenant Hill, the team was 
selected and the matches begun, one match being shot each week for ten weeks. The 
team finished fourth, which was very good for the first season. 

Lieutenant Hill saw the need of an outdoor range, which would be close to college 
and at the same time perfectly safe to fire the army rifle on. After making a personal 
tour of the surrounding country he selected the present site of the rifle range on the ani- 
mal husbandry farm just north of the dairy barn, and received permission from President 
Waters to dig a pit and put in targets. 

Last fall at the opening of school, Lieutenant Hill held a tryout for the purpose of 
sending a team to the Divisional Matches of the United States Army and National 
Guard at Ft. Riley. This was the first time K. S. A. C. was ever represented, but the 
team took fifth place, and we hope a team will be sent to these matches each year. 

At the close of the Ft. Riley matches Lieutenant Hill called a meeting of the rifle 
club, for the purpose of starting the indoor shooting, and about ninety men responded, 
among whom were six members of last year's team. At this meeting the following 
officers were elected: President, Major J. W. Linn; Secretary, Lieut. L. H. Bixby; 
Treasurer, R. F. Mirick; Range Captain, Lieut. Roy A. Hill. 

Lieutenant Hill informed the men that rifle shooting had come to stay if he could 
possibly make it succeed, and that he desired to put rifle shooting on the same basis as 
the other college sports, that is: the team should have a coach, a regular course of in- 
struction in rifle shooting, the members of the team would be excused from drill for prac- 
tice as other teams, and that an endeavor would be made to secure K's for the members 
of the team. 

Lieut. L. D. LaTourrette, N. G. A., a member of the Arizona Rifle Team to Camp 
Perry, Ohio, for five successive years, was engaged to coach the team and the result of 
his work was shown in the good scores the team made. Our team finished second in 
Class C Division, Yale beating us by the narrow margin of six points on the grand total 
of nine matches. Next year K. S. A. C. will be in Class B, and we hope will be able to 
win a prize in that division. 

The team regrets the loss of its Range Captain and National Rifle Association 
Judge, Lieut. Roy A. Hill, who will not be here next year as his assignment to College 
work expires next June and he will return to his regiment. Credit is due Lieutenant 
Hill for establishing rifle shooting in this institution and we trust it will continue. 

Sergeant E. L. Claeren helped the team out in many ways and acted as N.R.A. 
Judge during the absence of Lieutenant Hill. 




308 



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Troutman 



Kansas State Gallery Team, 1915 

Williams Croyle 

Hedstrom Warren Bixby 

Sgt. E. L. Claeren Lieut. R. A. Hill L. D. LaTourette 

U. S. A. Retired 7th Inf. U. S. A. 1st Az. N. G. (Coach) 

MeHugh Converse Allis 




Fleming 



First Kansas State Rifle Team 

Brackney Williams Troutman 

Fletcher Martin Bixby 



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Smith 
Rawson 
Hopkins Miller 

Gartrell 



Maury Vincent Fowler Linn 

Hooker Deal White Jackson Mowery 

Russell Hill Claeren Martin Williams Fletcher 

Douglas Burtis Cushman 

Company L 



The Scabbard and Blade is a National Military Society 

Honorary Members 
R. A. Hill E. L. Claeren 



Members 
P. E. Jackson 
A. P. Immenschuh 
C. A. Hooker 
O. E. Smith 

0. B. Burtis 
C. W. Gartrell 
J. W. Linn 

F. R. Rawson 

1. L. Fowler 
W. T. Douglas 
L. A. Maury 
H. R. Joslin 

H. B. Dudley 



L. V. Witcher 
T. K. Vincent 
O. O. Mowrey 
W. E. Deal 
A. E. Hopkins 
G. A. Russel 
W. T. White 
C. B. Williams 
C. Fletcher 
H. P. Miller 
E. R. Martin 
H. J. Adams 



Co. A. 
Co. B. 
Co. C. 
Co. D. 
Co. E. 
Co. F. 
Co. G. 
Co. H. 
Co. K. 
Co. L. 
Co. M. 



Pledge 
R. G. Cushman 

1st Regiment 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Minnesota 
University of Cornell 

University of Purdue 
University of Illinois 
University of Missouri 
State College of Pennsylvania 
Michigan Agricultural School 
Kansas State Agricultural College 
Ohio State University 
2nd Regiment 
Iowa State College 

311 






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Hiansas State !&an6 



Leader 


Baritones 


B. H. Ozment 


W. F. Smith 


Drum Major 


0. A. Bircher 


Chas. H. Zimmerman 


Horns 


Piccolo 


R. F. Coppel 


H. J. Austin 


A. E. Dyatt 




P. R. Fauleoner 


Flute 


K. E. Richardson 


W. T. Brink 




Oboe 


Saxophones 


H. A. Wagner 


W. B. Palmer 






J. D. Kreamer 


Clarinets 


.... .. Innis 


L. M. Hanna 






Trombones 


R. H. Oliver 






M. L. Coe 


J. Rosslar 






F. B. Cromer 


D. A. Robbins 






J. S. Gulledge 


J. W. Stockebrand 






H. C. McClelland 


F. J. Scriven 






0. I. Markham 


0. K. Rumbel 






W. Gillispie 


Cornets 






Basses 


A. M. Butcher 


G. W. Fisher 


E. W. Fauleoner 


L. F. Geller 


Clyde Long 




E. J. Meninger 


L. H. Gillis 




C. E. Elder 


Drums 


C. G. Vandenbark 


L. M. Hanna 


L. A. Meyer 


J. D. Williams 


W. F. Heppe 


D. C. West 


E. A. Schmoker 


R. H. Heppe 




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Hfotior Societies 



"He bears b,»s blushing t)onors thick upon b,im." 

— Shakespeare. 




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315 




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Colors- 



Fraternity founded at Ohio State University, 1897 
-Sky Blue and Mode Flower— Pink Carnation 



The purpose of Alpha Zeta (AZ) is to bring together such men as bid fair to be 
leaders in agriculture and to raise the general standard of its members in every way, 
not only in college but in after life. 



F RAT RES IN FACULTATE 



H. J. Waters 

O. E. Reed 

W. M. Jardine 

L. E. Call 

E. N. Wentworth 

J. B. Fitch 

W. A. Lippincott 

W. A. Cochel 

R. I. Throckmorton 

CM. Vestal 

C. W. McCampbell 

L. A. Fitz 

M. F. Ahearn 

George A. Dean 

Albert Dickens 



L. B. Mann 
A. L. Marble 
W. N. Skourup 
A. W. Aicher 
F. W. Johnson 
A. E. McClymonds 
O. L. Hubp 
J. P. Loomis 



L. D. Bushnell 



CHAPTER ROLL 

W. F. Taylor 
R. E. Freeto 
J. R. Mason 
A. J. Manglesdorf 
A. E. Lawson 
J. L. Garlough 
V. F. Stuewe 
H. C. Ewers 
P. B. Potter 



SOPHOMORE PLEDGES 



H. J. Adams 
R. B. Keys 
J. B. Sweet 
L. S. Hodgson 
Waldo F. Heppe 



G. E. Thompson 
H. L. Kent 
G. A. Gilbert 
C. A. Scott 
W. E. Grimes 
George S. Hine 
Ralph Kenny 
A. G. Hogan 
P. L. Gainey 
R. K. Bonnett 
W. H. Latshaw 
P. E. McNall 
L. P. Wehrle 
R. K. Nabours 
J. T. Willard 



J. R. Little 
L. H. Fairchild 
W. L. Wilhoite 
C. E. Millar 
H. R. Sumner 
G. M. Schick 
Earle Ramsey 
O. O. Browning 



Jay H. Cushman 
Robt. Osborne, Jr. 

F. I. Reynolds 
L. E. Howard 

G. E. Denman 



316 



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Freeto Hubp Loomis Browning Wilhoite 

Schick Ramsey Stuewe Lawson Garlough Potter 

Marble Ewers Mason I Johnson Little Skourup Sumner 

Aicher Taylor McClymonds Mann Fairchild Manglesdorf 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS 

Townshend Ohio State University 

Morrill Pennsylvania State College 

Morrow .... Illinois State University 

Cornell Cornell University 

Kedzie Michigan Agricultural College 

Granite New Hampshire Agricultural College 

Nebraska Nebraska University 

North Carolina North Carolina Agricultural College 

LaGrange Minnesota University 

Green Mountain . Vermont University 

Wilson Iowa State College 

Babeock Wisconsin University 

Centennial. Colorado Agricultural College 

Maine Maine University 

Missouri Missouri University 

Elliott Washington State College 

California California University 

Purdue Purdue University 

Kansas Kansas State Agricultural College 

Dacotah North Dakota Agricultural College 

Scovell Kentucky University 

Morgan Tennessee University 

Georgia Georgia University 



317 



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Founded at Ohio State University, January 18, 1907 

Eta Chapter 

Installed, Kansas State Agricultural College, April 5, 1912 

A * 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

F. S. Schoenleber, B. S. A.; M. S. A.; M. D.; D. 

L. W. Goss, D. V. M. 

R. R. Dykstra, D. V. M. 

J. H. Burt, D. V. M. 

R. V. Christian, D. V. M. 

J. G. Jackley, D. V. M. 

B. R. Rogers, D. V. M. 
J. B. Gingery, D. V. M. 
K. W. Stouder, D. V. M. 
S. E. Houk, D. V. M. 

C. W. McCampbell, B. S.; D. V. M. 



S. 



Alumni in the Faculty 
J. I. Kirkpatrick, D. V. M. 



Seniors 

W. A. Hagan 
W. C. McConnell 
I. L. Fowler 
M. E. Agnew 
J. W. Meyer 
Paul King 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Juniors 

Cecil Elder 
E. M. Dobbs 
E. F. Pile 
G. T. Reaugh 
A. F. Flanagan 
E. C. Jones 
G. W. FitzGerald 
Fred Hartwig 
G. H. Dean 



Sophomores 
Harve Frank 
J. B. Barnes 
P. K. Baker 
D. M. Green 



318 




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Alpha Chapter .... 

Beta Chapter 

Gamma Chapter 

Delta Chapter 

Epsilon Chapter 
Zeta Chapter 
Eta Chapter 
Theta Chapter... 
Iota Chapter 
Kappa Chapter 



CHAPTERS 

Ohio State University 

Cornell University 

Chicago Veterinary College 

Kansas City Veterinary College 

University of Pennsylvania 

Colorado State Agricultural College 

Kansas State Agricultural College 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Michigan Agricultural College 

Washington State College 




K " .. . " 




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Sigma Oau 

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Epsilon Chapter 

Installed at Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 

Colors— Blue and White Publication— "The Pyramid" 

2T 



CHAPTER ROLL 

The Faculty 



Graduates 



Seniors 



John Daniel Walters 
Andrey A. Potter 
Lowell Edwin Conrad 
Fred A. Wirt 

Stanley Smith 

Joel E. Bengtson 
Shelby G. Fell 
Lawrence V. Fickel 
Frank H. Freeto 
Albert H. Ganshird 
Charles W. Giffin 
Maynard P. Goudy 

Roy L. Swenson 

Juniors 
Benjamin M. Andrews 
Antis M. Butcher 
Walter L. Deal 
James S. Hagan 
Talbot R. Knowles 

Thomas K. Vincent 



Roy Andrew Seaton 
Clarence E. Reid 
Grayson B. McNair 
Siebert L. Simmering 

Albert Buck 

William W. Haggard 
Calvin A. Hooker 
Willard J. Loomis 
Paul E. Jackson 
William A. Lathrop 
Charles W. Shaver 
Ralph A. Shelley 



Harry D. Linscott 
Charles H. Zimmerman 
John R. Rathbun 
Frank R. Rawson 
Dodderidge G. Tate 



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320 



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Walters McNair Buck Wirt Reid Seaton Conrad Potter 

Hooker Shaver Shelley Andrews Fickel Loomis Goudy Fell Freeto 

Giffin Vincent Linscott Jackson Ganshird Lathrop Bengtson Haggard Swenson 

Smith Rathbun Hagan Deal Tate Butcher Knowles Rawson Zimmerman 



CHAPTERS 



Alpha 
Gamma 
Delta 
Epsilon 

Zeta 

Eta 

Thela 

Iota 

Kappa 
Lambda 



University of Nebraska 

University of Pennsylvania 

University of South Dakota 

Kansas State College 

Oregon State College 

Washington State College 

University of Illinois 

University of Colorado 

Pennsylvania State College 

University of Kansas 



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(Bamma Sigma iPelta 





Honorary Agricultural Fraternity 

Founded at Ohio University, December 1, 1905 

Kansas Eta Chapter 
Kansas State Agricultural College 
Installed at Kansas State Agricultural College, June 15, 1914 
Colors — Buff and Brown 



Flower — White Carnation 



Publication — "The Kansas Aggie" 
TZA 

Fratres in Facilitate 

Leo E. Melchers, B. S., Hort.; M. S. Ag. 
William P. Hayes, B. S. 
Fred S. Merrill, B. S. 
Alfred L. Clapp, B. S. 



Active Members 



Raymond V. Adams 
Hugh E. Baird 
Ary C. Berry 
Harry W. Cave 
Ralph C. Erskine 
Anson L. Ford 
Herbert H. Frizzell 
Charles W. Gartrell 
Henley H. Haymaker 
John V. Hepler 
James L. Jacobson 



Donald S. Jordan 
Paul King 
Fred M. Lay ton 
James H. McAdams 
Symington Morrow 
Walter J. Ott 
Edward Q. Perry 
Elbert L. Smith 
Clarence B. Williams 
John S. Wood 




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t&amma Sigma JDelta 




Williams Frizzell Hepler Layton 

Hayes Perry Morrow King Wood 

Baird Ford Ott Erskine Jacobson Smith 

Jordon Perry Cave McAdams Gartrell 



CHAPTERS 



Ohio Alpha Chapter . 

Iowa Beta Chapter 

Missouri Delta Chapter 
Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter .. 

Oregon Zeta Chapter 

Utah Epsilon Chapter 

Kansas Eta Chapter 



Ohio University 

Iowa State College 
Missouri University- 
Pennsylvania State College 
Oregon Agricultural College 
Utah State College 
Kansas State College 




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Zeta Iftappa jp^i 




Organized March, 1914 

Purpose— To promote interest in the forensic arts and to encourage fellowship 
and fraternity among the girls. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Edna Barber 
Valeda Downing 
Mary Poison 
Madge Thompson 
Lillian Lathrop 
Mary Johnson 
Wilma Burtis 



Dr. Harman 
Miss Boot 



PATRONESSES 



Lulu Davis 
Stella Gould 
Rose Baker 
Amy Baker 
Emma Taylor 
Mae Sweet 
Mary Dakens 



Miss Derby 

Mrs. J. T. Willard 



324 



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ZoXa "Kappa P$i 





Barber Burtis Wilson Poison Johnson Gould Downing 
Dakens Sweet Davis R. Baker Thompson A. Baker Taylor Lathrop 



CHARTER MEMBERS 




Steckelberg Downing 

Poison Lathrop 

Thompson 

325 



Halbower 



Burt 



Barber 



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Omicron 3tu 



Organized June, 1914, as Gamma Pi Gamma (mr) 
Flower — Sunflower Colors — Olive Green and Gold 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Edna St. John 
Helen D. Robinson 
Edna Barber 
Esther Nelson 
Bertha Baker 
Myrtle Blythe 
Esther Hammerli 
Minnie Gugenheim 
Valeda Downing 
Florence Smith 



Louise Price 
Juanita Reynolds 
Martha Conrad 



Grace Barker 



PLEDGES 



Louise Walbridge 
Izil Poison 
Bernice Wilson 
Dorothy Blazer 
Clara Willis 
Juanita Davis 
Jennie Shoup 
Marian Fowler 
Pauline Parkhurst 
Verma Treadway 



Amy Briggs 
Mildred Branson 
Josephine Allis 



IN URBE 

Helen McClanahan Keith 



326 




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Barber Gugenheim Treadway Blazer Walbridge Parkhurst Barker Poison Hammerli Wilson Downing 
Harshbarger Baker Nelson Smith Fowler Davis Willis Craven Blythe St. John Shoup 



CHARTER MEMBERS 



Alma Halbower 
Edna Coith 
Margaret Walbridge 
Eva Alleman 
Ruth Gilbert 
Emma Tomlinson 
Anna Steckleberg 
Rembert Harshbarger 
Mary Rowan 
Izil Poison 



June Milner 
Jennie Brown 
Eda Schowalter 
Edith Maxwell 
Margaret Jones 
Fay Elliott 
Helen McClanahan 
Eleanor Neiman 
Fae Paddock 



CHAPTERS OF OMICRON NU 



Alpha 
Beta 

Gamma 
Delta 
Epsilon 
Zeta ... 
Eta 
Theta 
Iota 
Kappa 
Lambda 



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Michigan Agricultural College 

New York State College for Teachers 

Iowa State College 

University of Purdue 

University of Illinois 

University of Nebraska 

University of Wisconsin 

Kansas State Agricultural College 

University of Kansas 

Washington State College 

University of St. Paul 

327 



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M0 



Jpi Happa iDelta 




Sumner Lush Wilson Fell Taylor Wheeler Dr. McArthur 

Loomis Ott Hull Hawkins Smith McArthur 

Hutchinson Grimes Rathbun Quigley Collins Mattson Bundy 



Founded at Ottawa University, January, 1913 

Kansas State Chapter, Installed, 1914 

Publication — "The Forensic" Colors — Cerise and Cream 



V. E. Bundy 
Shelby Fell 
Floyd Hawkins 
D. E. Hull 
Wallace Hutchinson 
W. H. Wilson 
Paul Loomis 
Jay L. Lush 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Dr. J. R. McArthur 
Waldo Grimes 



James McArthur 
Ivar Mattson 
Walter J. Ott 
J. V. Quigley 
J. P. Rathbun 
W. F. Taylor 
O. E. Smith 
P. H. Wheeler 



M. D. Collins 
Wm. A. Sumner 




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Sigma iMta dfy 





National Journalistic Fraternity 

Founded at DePauw University, April 17, 1909 

Installed at Kansas State Agricultural College, May 4, 1915 
SAX 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



H. J. Waters 
N. A. Crawford 
R. H. Heppe 
V. E. Bundy 
D. P. Ricord 

DePauw University 
Kansas University 
Michigan University 
Denver University 
Washington University 
Purdue 
Ohio State 

Wisconsin University 
Iowa University 
Illinois University 
Missouri University 



CHAPTERS 



J. W. Searson 
E. N. Wentworth 
E. H. Smith 
T. F. Blackburn 



Texas University 
Oregon University 
Oklahoma University 
Indiana University 
Nebraska University 
Iowa State 
Kansas State 
Maine University 
California University 
Louisiana University 
Montana University 



329 



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American (Tollege Quill (Hub 



Beta Chapter 

Installed, May 23, 1914 

Chancellor F. H. Freeto 

Vice-Chancellor W. A. Sumner 

Midan W. A. Lathrop 

Scribe Madge Thompson 

Keeper of Parchments Eva Hostetler 

Purpose — To encourage literary effort and criticism among American college 
students. To endeavor to establish worthy standards of literary taste. 




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American (Tollege Quill Club 




ROLL OF QUILL 



Thompson Blackburn 
Martha Blain 
Mildred Branson 
Edna Barber 
C. A. Brewer 
Margaret De Forest 
Frank Freeto 
Zora Harris 
Eva Hostetler 
Helen Haines 
Florence Justin 



William A. Lathrop 
Lillian Lathrop 
Ivar Mattson 
Kathrina Munger 
Mary Poison 
Mrs. E. B. Patrick 
Frank Sargent 
H. W. Snell 
Martha Tunstall 
Madge Thompson 
William T. Douglas 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



J. W. Searson 
N. W. Crawford 
R. G. Taylor 
H. W. Davis 



W. A. Sumner 
Estella M. Boot 
Ada Rice 
Carl Ostrum (deceased) 



331 



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Scarabs 



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Organized, 1914, K. S. A. C. 



Senior Honor Society 



NINETEEN FIFTEEN SCARABS 



Maynard P. Goudy 
Robert Thomas Wilson 
Fred Stevenson 
Ralph Cleland Erskine 
Don Louis Irwin 
Herbert Henely Haymaker 
Calvin Andrew Hooker 
Wilmer Homer Wilson 
Willard Jackson Loomis 
Keatley Graham Baker 
Merrill Ellsworth Agnew 



William Arthur Hagan 
Nicholas Fred Enns 
Floyd William Johnson 
Wilbur Neilson Skourup 
Charles William Gartrell 
Albert William Aicher 
Fred Morris Layton 
Lorenzo Berkley Mann 
William Witt Haggard 
Walter Francis Smith 



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Scarabs 





Irwin 
Aicher Hooker Gartrell Layton Baker Haggard 

Wilson Agnew Stevenson Enns Mann Skourup Loomis 

Smith Hagan Erskine Haymaker Johnson Goudy 



NINETEEN SIXTEEN SCARABS 

The Best of the '16 Class 



CHARTER MEMBERS 



J. Gordon Auld 
E. T. Boise 
Milton Borst 
A. P. Davidson 
W. S. Gates 
Thomas J. Harris 
H. Hildewein 
Robert Hood 
N. M. Hutchinson 
A. P. Immenschuh 
R. E. Karper 



M. C. Lytle 
Homer McNamara 
James Moss 
Ralph H. Musser 
F. P. Root 
Frank Sidorfsky 
F. A. Smutz 
Harry Stockwell 
Russell Williamson 
H. M. Zeigler 




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Poison Reynolds Perry Willis 

Burtis Waynick Harris Story 

Beall Gurnea Harper 



Flower — Daisy 



Price Marty 

Harlan Lawson 

Jones Branson 



Color — Yellow 



Eva Lawson 
Wilma Burtis 
Annette Perry 



President 

Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 



ROLL 



Juanita Reynolds 
Marie Story 
Ruth Hill 
Carrie Harper 
Mildred Branson 
Florence Jones 
Clara Willis 
Mary Gurnea 



Verda Harris 
Hildagarde Harlan 
Valeda Downing 
Lucile Beall 
Florence Waynick 
Louise Price 
Mary Poison 
Sara Marty 



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Ol)e Jforum 



An Honorary Society for Debaters and Orators 



Motto 



'To Be Rather Than to Seem" 




The Forum Owl sat on an oak, 
The more he saw the less he spoke, 
The less he spoke, the more he heard; 
Let us strive to be like that old bird." 





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Ol)e JForum 




337 



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Ol)e JForum 



Ruth Aiman 
V. E. Bundy 
Rose Baker 
Edna Barber 
Dan Burch 
W. T. Brink 
O. B. Burtis 
Wilma Burtis 
Mary Dakin 
Valeda Downing 
D. E. Hull 
Floyd Hawkins 
Wallace Hutchinson 
Roy Hagans 
Grace Cool 
Mary Johnson 
Florence Justin 
R. P. Ramsey 
L. V. Rhine 
O. K. Rumble 
John Rathbun 
W. L. Wilhoite 
D. L. Irwin 
Gurnea Prior 
Walter Ott 
Wilbur Skourup 
Katrina Munger 
Marian Fowler 
Mary Wilson 
Gertrude Wunder 
W. T. White 
P. H. Wheeler 
Wilmer Wilson 



ROLL OF MEMBERS. 

J. W. Linn 



Willard Loomis 
R. W. Thompson 
Jay Lush 
B. F. Griffen 
Mae Sweet 
Ivar Mattson 
Archie Marble 
James McArthur 
Stella Gould 
Mary Poison 
Josephine Perrill 
Thos. Pexton 
Shelby Fell 
Amy Gould 
J. V. Quigley 
0. E. Smith 
G. C. Smith 
Madge Thompson 
Will Taylor 
Lettie Noyce 
Emma Taylor 
A. G. VanHorn 
Wilma VanHorn 
Lulu Davis 
L. A. Zimmerman 
Ethel Arnold 
Hannah Campbell 
Lucile Maughlin 
Effie Carp 
G. W. Rhine 
Mary Taylor 
Eva Townsend 




338 



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Ot)e (Greeks 



We won't shake hands at meeting 

With many that pass by ; 
We nod the head in greeting 

To many that go by; 
But welcome thru the gateway 

Our few old friends and true; 
Then hearts leap up and straightway 

There's open house for you, 
Old friends, 

There's open house for you. 

— Gerald Massey. 





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Sigma .Alplja TEpsilon 





Kansas Beta Chapter 

Installed, January 25, 1913 

Founded at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, March 9, 1856 

Publications— The "Record" and "Phi Alpha" 



Colors— Purple and Gold 



Keatley G. Baker 
Charles A. Hunter 
Leon W. Taylor 
Robert E. Freeto 

Ary C. Berry 
Everett R. McGalliard 



MEMBERS 

Seniors 
Edwin Q. Perry 
Edgar L. Noel 
Laurence V. Fickel 
Frank Haucke 
Juniors 
Fabian C. Dickinson 
William H. Robinson 

Sophomores 
Joe S. Weaver 
Herbert P. Miller 



Flower — Violet 



W. Symington Morrow 
Walter H. Washington 
Frank H. Freeto 



Robert E. Curtis 
Benjamin B. Richards 



Bruce Lovett 

William T. Douglas 
Pledges 
William Sterling Sparrow 
Albert Edward Fincham 
George B. MaeDonnell 



Hunter 



Earl B. Briney 
Oliver F. Barnhart 

Freshmen 

Everett S. Stephenson 

Leslie A. Plumb 

Giles J. Sullivan 

Harry Edwin Alexander 

PRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Edwin N. Wentworth Fred C. Winship Oliver W 

David D. Gray Walter J. King 

POST GRADUATE 
Ray B. Ellis 

CHAPTERS 

University of Maine; Boston University; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
Harvard University; Worcester Polytechnic Institute; Dartmouth College; Cornell 
University; Columbia University; St. Stephens College; Syracuse University; Alleghany 
College; Dickinson College; Pennsylvania State; Bucknell University; Gettysburg 
College; University of Pennsylvania; University of Pittsburg; University of Virginia- 
George Washington University; Washington and Lee University; University of North 
Carolina; Davidson College; University of Michigan; Adrian College; Mt. Union College- 
Ohio Wesleyan University; University of Cincinnati; Ohio State University; Case School 
of Applied Science; Franklin College; Purdue University; University of Indiana- North- 
western University; University of Illinois; University of Chicago; Millikin University- 
University of Minnesota; Beloit College; University of Wisconsin; University of Georgia : 
Mercer University; Emory College; Georgia School of Technology; Southern University 1 
University of Alabama; Alabama Polytechnic Institute; University of Florida- Univer- 
sity of Missouri; Washington University; University of Nebraska; University of Arkansas- 
University of Kansas; Kansas State College; University of Iowa; Iowa State College- 
University of South Dakota; University of Colorado; University of Denver; Colorado 
School oi Mines; Louisiana University; Tulane University; University of Texas; Univer- 
sity of Oklahoma; Central University; Bethel College; Kentucky University; Southern 
Presbyterian University; Cumberland University; Vanderbilt University; University of 
Tennessee; University of the South; Union University; Leland Stanford University; 
University of California; University of Washington; Washington State College; Oregon 
state College. " 

340 



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Sigma .Alplja TEpsUon 




'» 'i 'i 'r » 



F. Freeto Sparrow R. Freeto Briney Haucke Lovett 

Washington Curtis Stevenson Douglas Dickenson Berry Morrow 

Noel McGalliard Alexander Fickle Baker Wurer Richards Hunter 

Taylor Perry Plumb Barnhart McDonald Robinson Miller 




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Sigma ytn 




Founded 1869 at Virginia Military Institute 
Colors — Gold, Black, and White Flower — White Rose 

Beta Kappa Chapter 
Established May 23, 1913 



A. R. Losh 

R. V. Christian 



A. P. Immenschuh 



Richard T. Wilson 
James D. Colt 



Robert J. Hanna 
H. Byron Dudley 
Orie W. Beeler 



Chas. L. Slentz 
Warren P. Fehlman 



George R. Hewey 
Paul Gaiser 
Don D. Hughes 

Howard Gillispie 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

W. A. Lippincott 
E. H. Reisner 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Paul Winnie 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Seniors 

Paul King 
Lorenzo B. Mann 
Harold C. Ewers 

Juniors 

James R. Mason 
Andrew J. Herold 

Sophomores 

Leslie N. Henderson 
David W. Burch 

Freshmen 

Joe J. Campbell 
John M. Boring 

Pledges 
342 




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§p 



S£K4L PURn& 



E. T. Hackney 
H. L. Smith 



E. A. Wright 



Harold L. Hurtt 
Henley H. Haymaker 



Raymond V. Adams 
Lewis A. Maury 
Luzerne H. Fairchild 



Samuel C. Sherwood 
Roscoe McMillan 



Elwyn Daleois 
Sidney B. Replogle 
William Campbell 

George Calkins 



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Sigma Mu 






Hughes Maury Hewey Wilson 

Adams Fehlman King Campbell Colt Herold Sherwood 

McMillan DuBois Birch Ewers Hanna Replogle Boring Beeler 

Gaiser Slentz J. Campbell Gillispie Fairchild Mann Mason 




343 



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Lflmumnnmmnnm 




4^1 Iftappa ^Alpba 




Alpha Omega Chapter 

Founded at University of Virginia, March 1, 1868 

Flower— Lily of the Valley Colors— Garnet and Old Gold 

Publications — "Shield and Diamond" and "Dagger and Key" 
iik a 

roll of members 



W. A. Bright 
C. W. Gartrell 

L. P. Whitehead 
G. E. Anderson 
S. R. Vandenberg 
E. J. Otto 

E. C. Miller 

C. G. Libby 
E. C. Giles 
Leonard Fuqua 
S. F. Bell 

Lee Randels 
I. A. Throckmorton 



Seniors 



Juniors 



J. V. Hepler 
Harold Goble 

R. N. Walker 
L. C. Teeter 
H. E. Baird 



John Fredenberg 

L. R. Vawter 
H. L. Helmkamp 
C. S. Briggs 
E. R. Gunn 

Wilbur Land 
E. V. Floyd 



Sophomores 
R. L. Mosier 

Freshmen 



Pledges 

Faculty Members 
Roy Gatewood 

CHAPTERS 

University of Virginia; Davidson College; William and Mary College; Southern 
University; University of Tennessee; Tulane University; Southwestern Pres. University; 
Hampton; Sidney College; Transylvania University; Richmond College; Washington 
and Lee University; University of North Carolina; Alabama Polytechnic Institute; 
North Georgia Agricultural College; Kentucky State University; Trinity College; 
Louisiana State University; Georgia School of Technology; North Carolina A. & M. 
College; University of Arkansas; University of Florida; Millsaps College; Missouri 
School of Mines; Georgetown College; University of Georgia; University of Missouri; 
University of Cincinnati; Southwestern University; Howard College; Ohio State Uni- 
versity; University of California; University of Utah; New York University; Iowa State 
College; Syracuse University; Rutgers College; Kansas State Agricultural College; 
Pennsylvania State College; University of Washington; University of Kansas; Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute; South Carolina Military Academy; Presbyterian College of South 
Carolina; Wofford College; University of South Carolina; Cumberland University; 
Vanderbilt University; Roanoke College; University of the South; Centenary College 
of Louisiana; West Virginia University. 

344 



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pi IKappa .Atf>l)a 




Gunn Hepler Randel Helmkamp Teeter Vawter 

Anderson Gatewood Bright Mosier Briggs Vandenburg 

Baird Krigbaum Giles Miller Walden Whitehead Fredenberg 

Otto Gartrell Hutchinson Bell Libby Goble 



I i 1 J ! I' 

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.Acacia JFratcrnit? 





Founded at University of Michigan, May 12, 1904 

Aleph-He Chapter 
Installed, December 6, 1913 



Publication — "The Acacia Journal" 

MEMBERS 



Milton C. Lytle 
Wilbur N. Skourup 
Fred B. Woodward 

George C. Ferrier 
Albert C. Bux 

George A. Bolz 

Elbert L. Smith 
Herbert L. Freese 
Lawrence C. Bernard 
A. H Acre 



Seniors 



Juniors 
William R. Bolen 

Sophomores 
Curtis A. Brewer 

Freshmen 



Leland D. Bushnell 
Harry L. Kent 



Henry J. Adams 
Alfred Apitz 
George C. Gibbons 
Harry D. Reed 
William C. Calvert 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Julius T. Willard 

IN URBE 

Elmer F. Kittell 



Colors — Black and Gold 

Nelson H. Davis 
Ralph Erskine 

Omar 0. Browning 
Lester H. Drayer 

Walter H. Hilts 

George H. Ansdell 
Walter W. Frizzell 
Donald S. Jordan 
Gaylord Phipps 



Jacob Lund 

Dr. F. S. Schoenleber 



CHAPTERS OF ACACIA 



Michigan University 

Kansas University 

California State 

Harvard 

Franklin 

Cornell 

Wisconsin University 

Chicago University 

Columbia 

Iowa University 

Washington University 

Kansas State 



Stanford University 
Nebraska University 
Ohio University 
Illinois University 
Minnesota University 
Missouri University 
Purdue 
Yale 

Iowa State 
Pennsylvania State 
Syracuse 



346 



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Acacia JVaterrUt? 





Browning Ferrier Bushnell Bolen Skourup 

Drayer Bolz Freese Woodward Bux Brewer 

Ansdell Erskine Calvert Lytle Phipps Frizell Adams 

Chittenden Hilts Davis Apitz Reed Smith 




347 



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^eta Ol)eta Jpi 




Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, 1839 
Colors — Pink and Blue Flower- 

Gamma Epsilon Chapter 

Established October 17, 1914 

Ben 



-Rose 



Dr. J. D. Walters 

Dr. C. W. MeCampbell 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

W. M. Jardine 
A. M. Paterson 

CHAPTER ROLL 



N. F. Enns 
E. L. Jenkins 



J. H. Welsh 
F. W. Albro 

J. H. Cushman 
W. F. Heppe 

E. H. Ptacek 
H. L. Robinson 
J. B. Salisbury 



Amherst 

Bowdoin 

Central 

Colorado College 

Columbia 

Denison 

Hanover 

Iowa State 

Kansas 

LeHigh 

Miami 

Nebraska 

Ohio State 

Pennsylvania 

St. Lawrence 

Syracuse 

Union 

Wabash 

Washington State 

West Virginia 

Wooster 



Seniors 
R. A. Shelley 
L. E. McGinnis 

Juniors 
F. A. Korsmeier 
J. H. Sharpe 

Sophomores 
R. G. Cushman 
S. R. Swaller 

Freshmen 
L. D. Ptacek 
R. A. VanTrine 
J. D. Kreamer 

CHAPTERS IN AMERICA 

Beloit Bethany 

Brown California 

Chicago Cincinnati 

Colorado School of Mines 



Cornell 

Denver 

Idaho 

Iowa 

Kansas State 

Maine 

Michigan 

North Carolina 

Ohio Wesleyan 

Pennsylvania State Purdue 

South Dakota Stanford 

Texas Toronto 

Utah Vanderbilt 

Washington and Jefferson 

Wesleyan Western Reserve 

Williams Wisconsin 

Yale 



H. H. King 
S. A. Smith 



Fred Stevenson 
Wm. O'Connell 



J. H. McAdams 
J. M. Aye 

R. H. Heppe 
E. T. Englesby 

D. C. West 
S. M. Mitchell 
L. V. Ritter 



Boston 

Case 

Colgate 

Colorado 

Davidson 

Dickinson 

Indiana 

John Hopkins 

Knox 



Dartmouth 

DePauw 

Illinois 

Iowa Wesleyan 

Kenyon 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Minnesota Missouri 

Northwestern Ohio 

Oklahoma Oregon 

Rutgers 
Stevens 
Tulane 
Virginia 
Washington 
Westminster 
Wittenberg 




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Salisbury Cushman 

L. Ptacek J. Cushman Aye Robinson Mitchell 

Kreamer Heppe Swaller Albro W. Heppe Sharp 

Jenkins Welsh Shelly Enns Stevenson O'Connell McGinnis 

E. Ptacek McAdams West Englesby Korsmier VanTrine 




2 



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.Aztex 





Organized February 19, 1910 
Colors — Lavender and Blue 



Flower — Violet 



Publication — "The Arrow' 



D. Ernest Lewis 



F RAT RES IN FACULTATE 



Robert K. Bonnett 



I. Loren Fowler 
David R. Shull 
H. A. Gunning 

O. B. Burtis 
W. T. White 
T. K. Vincent 

John Sellon 
Reed Weimer 
John Elliott 
Thompson Blackburn 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Graduate 
L. P. Werhle 

Seniors 



Juniors 



Sophomores 



Charles F. Layton 
Chauncey Sawyer 



Freshmen 

Leon F. Montague 
Kent Dudley 

Pledges 
G. W. Givin 



A. E. McClymonds 
Fred M. Layton 
F. W. Johnson 

Emmett Skinner 
Eddell C. Jones 



L. E. Howard 
Loren Lupfer 
Frank P. Dowling 



Fred B. Wenn 
R. H. Rexroad 



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350 



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.A^tex 





Fowler Vincent Blackburn 

McClymonds F. Layton Dowling Rexroad Skinner Elliott 

Shull Howard Montague Lupfer Sellon Sawyer Jones Dudley 

Burtis Weimer Wenn White Gunning Johnson C. Layton 




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Sigma $fyi i>elta 




Organized May 16, 1914 
Colors— Sky Blue and Dark Blue Flower — Red Carnation 

S*A 

CHAPTER ROLL 



Paul E. Jackson 
Chester A. Carter 



Seniors 
3. Irl Michaels 
B. M. Andrews 



Charles W. Giffin 
Gerald L. Fitzgerald 



Juniors 



George S. Douglas 
W. C. McGraw 



Robert A. Graves 
W. W. Rutter 



A. Earl Dyatt 



Sophomores 
Elwin L. Smith 



Russel O. Andruss 



Freshmen 



George O. Kelley 



Dan M. McElvain 



Pledge 
Louis G. Newman 




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Sigma Jpbi 4>elta 



McElvaine FitzGerald 

Kelley Graves Michels 

Andrews Douglas 



Newman McGraw Dyatt 

Giffin Carter Andruss 

Jackson Rutter Smith 





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^Ztett's Jpan-Ufellenic (Touncil 





The object of the Pan-Hellenic Council is to place such regulations and restrictions 
on the fraternities as will benefit the fraternities and their college. 



Fraternity Representatives 



Aztex 
W. T. White 
F. W. Johnson 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
K. G. Baker 
A. C. Berry 



Sigma Nu 
H. C. Ewers 
J. R. Mason 



Pi Kappa Alpha 
C. W. Gartrell 
L. P. Whitehead 



Beta Theta Pi 
R. A. Shelley 
N. F. Enns 



Acacia 
R. C. Erskine 
C. A. Brewer 




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Women's jp atl -^ e ^ enic vTouncil 




Bryan Hildreth Churchward Groff Earnest UpdegrafI Treadway McCorkle Reynolds 

The purpose of the Girls' Pan-Hellenic Council of K. S. A. C: 

1. To fix the date of Pledge Day. 

2. To regulate the rules for rushing. 

3. To regulate other matters of inter-sorority interest in this College presented to it 
for consideration. 

4. To co-operate with the College authorities and all College organizations in 
questions of general College interest. 

Members of Girls' Pan-Hellenic Council 



Phi Beta Phi 

Mary Churchward 
Adelaide Updegraff 
Agnes McCorkle 



Lambda Lambda Theta 
Hazel Groff 
Bess Hildreth 
Juanita Reynolds 



Delta Delta Delta 

Elsie Bryan 
Faith Earnest 
Verma Treadway 




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Delta ~Delta ~Delta 





Founded 1888 
Installed at Kansas State, June 5, 1915 

Flower— Pansy Colors— Silver, Gold and Blue 

AAA 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Post Graduate 
Dorothy Blazer 



Mary Inez Mann 
Esther Zeininger 
Crystal Kelley 
Bess Pyle 

Ruth Hoffman 
Nelle Flinn 
Faith Earnest 



Laura Becker 
Mildred Smith 



Ruth Crane 
Dorothy Norris 
Claudine Rathman 
Pauline Richards 



Laura Cannon 



Seniors 



.Juniors 



Sophomores 



Freshmen 



Pledges 



D. Elsie Bryan 
Carrie Belle Gardner 
Verma Treadway 
Mary Gurnea 

Hildegarde Harlan 
Grace Lyons 
Florence Waynick 



Mary Brackett 
Franc Sweet 



Gladys Hoffman 
Donna Crane 
Alice Neiman 
Helen Calkins 



Mina Jones 



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G. Hoffman Blazer Gurnea Zeininger Gardner Flinn Lyons Harlan Kelly 
Bryan Treadway Mann D. Crane Rathman Pyle R. Crane Sweet Smith Brackett 
Earnest R. Hoffman Neiman Norris Becker Cawkins Cannon Waynick Richards 




357 




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Founded 1904 
Colors— Green used with White Flower— White Chrysanthemum 

AA8 
CHAPTER ROLL 

Sorores in Facilitate 
Clare Biddison 



Mrs. Karl Kipp 
Mrs. William Dunn 



Ruth Hill 
Meta Sheaff 

Mildred Branson 
Juanita Reynolds 



Merle Beeman 
Nina Mae Powell 
Edna Klein 



Helen Fearl 

Ethel Sheilds 



Marguerite Elliott 



Sorores in Urbe 

Mrs. Oliver Hunter 
Seniors 

Juniors 

Bess Hildreth 
Sophomores 

Ruth Simpson 
Freshman 

Pledges 
358 



Vesta Smith 
Louise Fielding 



Rembert Harshbarger 
Vivian Herron 



Hazel Groff 
Frances Ewalt 



Teresa Goodwyn 
Gladys Grove 
Emily Lofinek 



Mary VanDeveer 
Jessie Alexander 



Anna Howard 



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Branson Goodwyn Elliott VanDeveer Sheaff Hildreth Groff Beaman Hill Herron Reynolds 
Harshbarger Lofinck Goddard Fearl Alexander Klein Powell Howard Ewalt Sheilds Grove Simpson 




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Founded at Monmouth College, 1867 

Colors— Wine and Silver-Blue Flower— Red Carnation 

Publication — "The Arrow" 
ITB* 

Sorore in Facilitate 
Virginia Lee Meade 

CHAPTER ROLL 
Seniors 

Lucille Beall 
Juniors 

Corinne Myers 
Sophomores 

Mildred Robinson 
Freshmen 

Marion Quinlan 

Special 
Marjorie Whitney 

Pledge 
Irma Boerner 



Jane Kingan 
Bernice Wilson 



Florence Jones 
Eva Lawson 
Louise Greenman 



Judith Briggs 
Agnes McCorkle 



Helen Winnie 
Dorothy McGinnis 



Mary Churchward 
Maurine Allison 



Helene Held 
Edith Updegraff 
Margaret Fuller 



Irene Held 
Adelaide Updegraff 



Evalyn Togeman 
Ruth Siefkin 



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Mills Meade Kingan Siefkin Wilson Allison McCorkle Churchward Lawson 
Fuller Quinlan Winnie Morton Greenman Myers Whitney A. Updegraff Beall 
E. Updegraff Robinson I. Held McGinnis Logeman H. Held Briggs Boerner Jones 





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Flower — Red Rose 



Myrtle Blythe 



Elsie Hart 
Sara Marty 
Louise Price 



Laura Ramsey 
Mabel Howard 



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J^i^a ^#u 



Organized February 1914 



Colors — Maroon and Silver 



AM 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Seniors 
Juniors 



Sophomores 



Minnie Lansdowne 



Clara Willis 



Ora McMillen 
Ella Phenicie 
Marie Moses 



Elizabeth Bousfield 
Grace Gardner 



Freshmen 
Gertrude McQuaid Murle Gann 

Martha Davis 



Pledges 



Isla Bruce 
Eurba Kaull 



Grace Dickman 
Mae McCabe 



In Urbe 
Ethel Roseberry Grimes 

362 



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Phenicie Hart Blythe McMillen Willis Bousfield Lansdowne Bruce Price Ramsey 
Howard Marty Gardner McQuaid Gann Davis McCabe Moses Dickman 








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Delta £eta 





Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, 1902 

Installed at Kansas State Agricultural College, May 20, 1915 

Publication — "The Lamp" 

Colors — Old Rose and Nile Green Flower — Pink Rose 




Ruth Milton 
Mary Poison 



Mary Alice Wilcox 



AZ 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Juniors 

Ruth Hutchings 

Sophomore 
Dorothy Hadley 

Freshmen 
Georgie McBroom 



Grace Fox 
Kate Sumners 



Carolyn E. Lear 



Miami University 
Indiana State University 
Nebraska State University 
Iowa State University 
Lombard College 
Kansas Agricultural College 



CHAPTERS 

Cornell University 
DePauw University 
Ohio State University 
Washington State University 
California State University 



Indianapolis, Indiana 
Columbus, Ohio 
New York, N. Y. 



ALUMNAE CHAPTERS 

Oxford, Ohio 
Lincoln, Nebraska 



Muf 



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Titerar? Societies 



"education should be as broafc as man." 

— Emerson 





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Urttersoctet? Council 





President 

Secretary-Treasurer.. 



W. A. Lathrop 
Emma E. Taylor 



Eurodelphian 

Edna I. St. John 
Emma E. Taylor 



Athenian 

W. A. Lathrop 
J. V. Quigley 



Franklin 
Jay L. Lush 
R. P. Ramsey 



Ionian 
Jennie E. Shoup 
Evelyn Schriver 



Webster 

Ralph W. Taylor 
Clarence B. Williams 



Alpha Beta 

John Hungerford 
Mary L. Taylor 






Hamilton 
O. E. Smith 
J. L. Garlough 



366 



niTiini'iiiiiTiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriirr 



Browning 

Esther J. Hammerli 
Hannah M. Campbell 




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J. P. Loomis 
F. H. Freeto 
W. A. Lathrop 
W. F. Taylor 
A. Unruh 
M. Walley 
C. W. Haines 
P. Hale 
O. Hubp 
L. M. Nabours 
E. F. Wilson 
0. 0. Browning 
P. Robinson 
C. D. Sappin 



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.Athenians 




MEMBERS 

G. C. Smith 
H. R. Sumner 
R. B. Keys 
L. M. Mason 
F. H. Gulick 
J. V. Quigley 
A. J. Hoffman 
J. B. Collister 
A. R. Newkird 
W. A. Gillespie 
D. E. Carry 

F. Unruh 

G. H. Secrist 
L. Moser 

C. W. Terrell 



H. E. Soiter 
J. B. Sweet 
J. H. Flora 

F. E. Mixa 
H. C. Seebers 
W. A. Honk 
T. R. Knowles 
L. H. Gilles 

H. C. Teagarden 

G. C. Wae 
C. Rude 

J. M. Dodwill 
W. R. Thompson 
B. F. Griffin 





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^Atl)enians 





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W. F. Taylor 
H. R. Thompson 




.Athenians 




Orator 
J. P. Loomis 




Debating Squad 
J. V. Quigley 
G. C. Smith 



B. F. Griffin 
J. B. Sweet 




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drownings 




Organized January 10, 1910 



MEMBERS 



Mary Courter 
Elsie Bucheim 
Josephine Perrill 
Eva Pease 
Esther Hammerli 
Gertrude Wunder 
Mary Weible 
Lucile Maughlin 
Edna Gulick 
Gertrude Palmer 
Effie Carp 
Ethel Newkirk 
Nellie Boyle 
Fern Roderick 
Lucile Carey 
Elsie Ford 
Edna Boyle 
Fern Faubion 
Helen Mitchell 
Anna Laura Miller 
Cecil Miller 
Helen Brown 
Vera King 
Josie Griffith 



Alta Hepler 
Rose Baker 
Hannah Campbell 
Rachel Clark 
Blanche Clark 
Clara Sachan 
Goldie Mitchell 
Cleo Roderick 
Marion Keys 
Edith Boyle 
Margaret Robinson 
Vina Williams 
Alma Pyle 
Irene Walker 
Lois Bellomy 
Myrtle Collins 
Lulu Davis 
Edith Arnold 
Ethel Arnold 
Edna Pickrell 
Marie Pickrell 
Anna Neer 
Blanche Langer 




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drownings 




373 



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drownings 




ORATOR 

Effie May Carp 



DEBATERS 

Rose Baker Lulu Davis 



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\#ebsters 





Fall 
President W. F. Smith 

Vice-President W. J. Loomis 

Recording Secretary C.B.Williams 

Corresponding Secretary C. E. Lovett 
Treasurer A. E. Hopkins 



Abele 

Aicher 

Barnes 

Brookover 

Bundy 

Crumbaker 

Fix 

Heacock 

Jordon 

Lovett 

Patterson 

Shelley 

J. W. Stocklebrand 

Tubbs 

G. W. Williams 

Wilson 



OFFICERS 

Winter 
J. H. Loomis 
H. H. Coxen 
G. E. Denman 
H. B. Bayer 



Spring 
H. H. Coxen 
H. B. Bayer 
J. S. Wood 
M. L. Gould 





MEMBERS 


Allen 


Adair 


Arnold 


Baker 


Borland 


Bayer 


Brookover 


Bruce 


Calvert 


Coxen 


Cunningham 


Caton 


Fairchild 


Gould 


Hopkins 


Hilts 


Laude 


J. H. Loomis 


Kenyon 


Marble 


Pryor 


Ramey 


Skourup 


Smith 


Stratton 


Sperry 


Wright 


White 


J. S. Wood 


P. B. Wood 


Holroyd 


Grandfield 




375 



J. W. Stockebrand C. B. Williams 



Adams 

Barnes 

Bolen 

Burtis 

Croyle 

Denman 

Hine 

James 

W. J. Loomis 

Phinney 

Sellers 

H. W. Stockebrand 

Taylor 

C. B. Williams 

J. C. Wood 

Gibbons 



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376 



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377 






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^ebsters 




ORATOR 

V. E. Bundy 




DEBATER 

W. B. Adair 
378 




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Organized 1904 



SOCIETY OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer... 



Fall Term 
Pearl Cross 
Ella Miltner 
Grace Cool 
Edna Hawkins 
Esther St. John 



Winter Term 
Valeda Downing 
Pauline Parkhurst 
Frieda Stuewe 
Dale Newell 
Minnie Gugenheim 



Spring Term 
Edna St. John 
Verral Craven 
Kate Sumners 
Lois Stewart 
Grace Cool 



MEMBERS 



Ruth Aiman 
Elsie Blaylock 
Mable Bodkin 
Vesta Cool 
Grace Curie 
Velora Fry 
Minnie Gugenheim 
Alice Gish 
Frances Hildebrand 
Pauline Parkhurst 
Thursa Pitman 
Mable Ruggles 
Esther St. John 
Emma Taylor 
Eva Townsend 
Bess Walsh 
Pauline Clarke 
Blanche Berger 
Emily Wilson 
Dorothea Schloh 
Kate Sumners 
Madge Rowell 
Ella Miltner 
Lois Noyes 
Dale Newell 
Cora Pitman 
Fern Preston 
Mildred Barnes 
Estella Barnum 
Blanche Baird 
Ethel Cary 
Lettie Noyce 
Kathrine Munger 



Wilma Burtis 
Laura Falkenrich 
Lola Davis 
Valeda Downing 
Laura Ramsey 
Edna St. John 
Clara Robbins 
Clara Willis 
Lina Tulloss 
Lois Stewart 
Fannie Brooks 
Mary Poison 
Lydia Hokanson 
Ruth Barnes 
Blanche Gorrell 
Edith Parkhurst 
Marion Fowler 
Grace Willets 
Frieda Stuewe 
Verral Craven 
Sara Marty 
Mildred Tolles 
Grace Cool 
Magdelen Thompson 
Hazel St. John 
Lillian Jeter 
Mary Glenn 
Edna Hawkins 
Elizabeth March 
Evelyn Kizer 
Edythe Gilleland 
Velona Cutler 



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ORATOR 

Emma Taylor 





DEBATERS 
Mary Poison Marion Fowler 



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IHamilton 



President . 

Vice-President 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer 



HAMILTON OFFICERS, 1914-1915 

Fall Term Winter Term 

J. D. Parsons 
M. P. Goudy 
J. L. Garlough 
Z. C. Rechel 
D. E. Hull 



G. 
O. 
R. 



H. Snell 



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E. Baird 
L. E. Baldwin 
A. W. Boyer 
C. R. Brackney 
W. T. Brink 
C. Brown 
W. H. Brooks 
P. B. Buchanan 
P. A. Carnahan 
W. K. Charles 
Ray Chambers 
W. B. Coffman 
Herbert Coith 

E. M. Dobbs 
H. L. Dunham 
W. C. Ernsting 
C. R. Enlow 
S. Fell 

I. G. Freeman 
J. L. Garlough 
N. A. Gish 
M. P. Goudy 
Ed. Gregory 
A. Griffith 
S. R. Gardner 
W. A. Hagan 

F. R. Rawson 
Z. C. Rechel 
Geo. Reaugh 
C. L. Reeve 
P. C. Ringwalt 
O. K. Rumble 



M. Schick 
E. Smith 
L. Swenson 




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Tfamilton 




ORATOR 
Don L. Irwin 



J. P. Rathbun 
Shelby Fell 



DEBATERS 



D. E. Hull 





O. E. Smith 
Floyd Hawkins 



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Motto — Diamond Cut Diamond 



Fall Term 
Edna Barber 



PRESIDENTS 

Winter Term 
Mary Johnson 



Edna Barber 
Bertha Baker 
Grace Barker 
Myrtle Blythe 
Bess Brown 
Minerva Cooper 
Amy Gould 
Elsie Hellwig 
Mildred Hollingsworth 
Mary Johnson 
Eva Kell 
Katherine Laing 
May Landis 
Esther Lyon 
Esther Nelson 
Mrs. Eleanor Patrick 
Evelyn Potter 
Georgia Roberts 
Anna Searl 
Jennie Shoup 
Emma Stratton 
Anna Thomas 
Louise Walbridge 
Glenn Warren 
Ina Belle Wilson 
Ruth Adams 
Stella Gould 
Helen Garvie 
Charlotte Hall 
Myrtle Johnson 
Amy Lamberson 
Beulah McNall 
Harriet Morris 
Laura Mueller 
Stella Blain 
Ethel Gaston 
Louise Blair 
Anna Patton 
Viola Peterson 
Mae Sweet 
Madge Thompson 



Agnes Irwin 



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Colors — Silver and Gold 



Spring Term 
Amy Gould 

Josephine Allis 
Isla Bruce 
Amy Briggs 
Stella Blain 
Martha Conrad 
Grace Gardner 
Edith Inskeep 
Vivian Neiswander 
Cleda Pace 
Gladys Phillips 
Louise Price 
Juanita Reynolds 
Pearl Schowalter 
Evelyn Schriver 
Mary Scott 
Florence Smith 
Franc Sweet 
Madge Austin 
Mildred Batchelor 
Hazel Brown 
Elizabeth Burnham 
Myrtle Baurefind 
May Brookshire 
Marie Hellwig 
Cora De Vault 
Mary Fink 
Martha Tunstall 
Frances Walsh 
Lois Weimer 
Genevieve Bruce 
Mary Dakin 
Ruth Daum 
Murl Gann 
Rosalie Godfrey 
Mary Giles 
Faith Harling 
Frances Stahl 
Sarah Robinson 
Donna Fay Wilson 
Jenetta Wheeler 
Gleah Brown 




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ORATOR 
Amy Gould 





Mae Sweet 
Madge Thompson 



DEBATERS 



Ina Belle Wilson 
Stella Gould 



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OFFICERS 



Fall 



President 

Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Treasurer 



Edith Foltz 
Jay Lush 
Myrna Lawton 
L. A. Zimmerman 



Winter 

Jay Lush 
Roy Hagans 
Ada Billings 
R. E. Jones 



Sprint/ 

Roy Hagans 
E. Dempewolf 
Hazel Richardson 
Everett Billings 



FRANKLIN ROLL 



Edith Alsop 
F. E. Alsop 
Ada Billings 
Everett Billings 
A. M. Butcher 
Luster Brooks 
Helen Boyd 
Judson A. Black 

C. Edward Black 
M. L. Coe 
Merle Converse 
Raymond Campbell 
Robert Copple 

E. Dempewolf 
L. S. Dubbs 

F. H. Dillenbeck 
Juanita Engle 
Cecil Elder 
Robert J. Fisher 
Chester Herrick 
Roy F. Hagans 
Mae Hildebrand 

D. R. Hooton 
Grace Howell 
Nellie Hunt 
Celia Johnson 
Alice Johnson 
R. E. Jones 
Lea Jewett 
Katrina Kimport 
Myrna Lawton 



W. E. Lyness 
Jay Lush 
L. D. LaTourette 
Lora McKinney 
Flora A. Morris 
Ethel Marshall 
Ivar Mattson 
Mary Moss 
T. E. Moore 
Cynthia E. McGuire 
Comfort Neal 
M. A. Nicholson 
Lenora Nicolay 
Francis Nettleton 
Raymond S. Orr 
Ralph Ramsey 
Elliott Ranney 
Hazel Richardson 
A. E. Shattenburg 
Mrs. Shattenburg 
J. L. Snyder 
Wallace Thackery 
A. G. Van Horn 
Wilma Van Horn 
Mame Wartenbee 
Pearl Wartenbee 
C. R. Witham 
J. W. Worthington 
Chas. Zimmerman 
L. A. Zimmerman 
Emma Zimmerman 



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ORATOR 

Jay Lush 



Jay Lush 
Lea Jewett 



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DEBATERS 

Flora Morris 



E. Billings 
R. S. Orr 





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Wah Hoo, Wah Hoo, 
Rip, Rip, Azoo, 
Hoo Ray Hoo 
For Old A. B. 
Wah Hoo, Wah Hoo! 



MEMBERS 



Walter Ott 
Chas. Halbert 
G. Ikenberry 
Florence Justin 
Zora Harris 
L. C. Geisendorf 
E. O. Jorgenson 
Ray Whitenack 
John Hungerford 
W. A. Wunsch 
Henry Brown 
Wallace Hutchinson 
James McArthur 
Harry Schaper 
Mary Lane 
Nettie Hendrickson 
Thomas Pexton 
Herman Zimmerman 



Lethe Marshall 
Letha Lasswell 
Dee Bird 
Paul Gwin 
Verda Harris 
Essie Peterson 
Arthur Seeber 
Emma Evans 
Pearle McHenry 
Delna Evans 
Emma Ellersick 
Doris McKee 
Mary Taylor 
C. L. Roach 
C. L. Hedstrom 
Otto Githens 
Belle Taylor 
Lulu Stewart 




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ORATOR 

Walter J. Ott 
First Place 




DEBATERS 



Florence Justin 
Lethe Marshall 



James McArthur 
Mary Taylor 



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(Hubs an6 ^Associations 




"Obc law: 3t \)<xs honored us; mav we honor it!" 

— Webster 






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y. 3tt. d. ^&. Cabinet 1914-1915 










John Kienc W. C. McConnell Joe Sweet O. E. Smith Jas. Hull Wellington Brink J. L. Garlough 
John Parsons Don Irwin Leon Moody W. W. McLean Harold Luhnow 

Floyd Hawkins 




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Pouns Somen's (TfyrisUaa Association 





OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 

COMMITTEE 

Religious Meetings 

Bible Study .... 

Missionary 

Social 

Association News .... 

Social Service 

Music 

Conventions and Conference* 

Finance 

Annual Member . 
Membership 
General Secretary 



Lina Tulloss 

Ethel Carey 

Mary Weible 

D'Elsie Bryan 



CHAIRMEN 



Bernice Wilson 

Mary Johnson 

Esther Nelson 

Lois Stewart 

Vivian Herron 

Florence Smith 

Evelyn Schriner 

Stella Gould 

Bess Walsh 

Wilma Burtis 

Ruth Adams 

Miss Pauline Groves 



401 



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Stu6ent Volunteer 




The Student Volunteer Band was organized at K. S. A. C. soon after the na- 
tional Student Volunteer Convention at Nashville in 1906. The local band cooperates 
with the national organization of the Student Volunteer Movement of America in spread- 
ing the missionary spirit throughout the country, helping in every possible way to bring 
about a realization of the slogan of the organization which is, "The Evangelization of 
the World in This Generation." 

Every Volunteer is a missionary at heart and although the great majority of them 
never reach the foreign field, a great many take up some form of missionary work in this 
country and all of them are ever ready to co-operate with any movement that works 
for the uplift of the human race. 

Those who have gone from K. S. A. C. to foreign missionary fields are: 

Miss Lily K. Haas To China, 1914 

Mr. John C. Taylor To India, 1914 

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Nelson To Mexico from 1907 to 1912 



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Colors — Green and White 

MoHo- 



Cleda Pace 
Grace Rudy 
Flossie Brown 
Juanita Reynolds 
Anna Neer 
Florence Dodd 
Ethel Tharp 
Hazel Peck 
Addie Anderson 
Bess McGraw 
Pauline Parkhurst 
Mable Hinds 
Edith Parkhurst 
Katherine Miller 
Clara Robbins 
Kitty Faulconer 



Flower — White Carnation 



-Love, Friendship, Service 



MEMBERS 



Mary McNamara 
Leona Moore 



Alumni 



Nellie Reed 



Honorary 
Pearl Dooley 
Mabel Fleming 
Avis Blaine 
Mollie Smith 
Bess Gordon 
Bess Smith 
Maude Hamilton 
Nellie Purdy 
Ora Jenkins 
Carrie Palmer 
Orlena Baker 
Hazel Rudy 
Erma Breneman 
Gertrude Davis 



Mabel Purdy 
Jeanetta James 



On November 26, 1913, the girls of the First Christian Church formed an organiza- 
tion to establish and maintain a friendly relationship among the girls of Kansas State 
interested in the Christian Church, and to make it a real means of Christian influence. 

This organization is now recognized as an organization of Kansas State, and is one 
of the chapters of the National Organization of the Bethany Circle. 



403 



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I3l)e Veterinary 3#edical Association 




Organized October 20, 1906 

The object of this Association is technical training along Veterinary lines, together 
wit h such literary and social training as may accompany it. Meetings are held twice 
each month in the evening and consist of a program and regular business meeting. 
Members of the Veterinary faculty and other men prominent in Veterinary and allied 
lines appear before the Association in these meetings as well as the members themselves. 
Upon graduation, the members in good standing are presented with sheepskin diplomas 
in recognition of their work. 



OFFICERS 



Fall Term 



Winter Term 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer.. 



W. C. McConnell W. A. Bright 
Cecil Elder H. A. Hoffman 

Paul King Frank Pile 

ROLL OF ACTIVE MEMBERS 
Seniors 



Spring Term 

Z. H. McDonnall 
Fred Hartwig 
G. W. FitzGerald 



M. E. Agnew W. A. Bright 

W. A. Hagan Paul King 

Z. H. McDonnall W. J. Scanlon 



L. V. Cummings I. L. Fowler 

J. W. Meyer W. C. McConnell 

G. M. Smith T. K. Toothaker 



E. M. Dobbs 
Fred Hartwig 
Geo. Reaugh 



Harve Frank 
A. E. Shattenburg 
H. A. Hoffman 
A. J. Hoffman 



C. G. Libby 



Juniors 

Cecil Elder G. W. FitzGerald 

Robt. McArthur C. E. Oneil 
G. A. Riley E. C. Jones 



Sophomores 

W. A. Joslin C. E. Long 

J. W. Worthington D. M. Green 

L. L. Whetney H. E. VanTuyl 

E. Schmoker P. K. Baker 



Freshmen 

L. R. Noyes J. B. Hinds 

L. R. Vawter 



A. L. Flanagan 
Frank Pile 



N. A. McCosh 
W. A. Houk 
D. M. Purdy 
H. G. Newton 



C. Honneywell 



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Veterinaries 





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Ol)e iDairy Association 



The Dairy Association is in its second year of existence. The increase in member- 
ship and activity of the Association this year indicates its growth. 

The membership of the Association is open to any student interested in dairying. 
It is the purpose of this organization to bring the students interested in dairy work in 
closer touch and to give the underclassmen an opportunity to see the advantages of 
dairying before choosing their course in college. 

We held our second annual stock judging contest this year and awarded three medals 
to the winners. 




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Ol)e iDair? Association 





Whitenack Hupp 
Cave Brooks Arnold 

C. Wilson H. Wilson Prof. Reed 

Buchanan Aicher 



Linn Campbell Beatey 

Stuewe Morrow Williams 

Jordan Loomis Fairchild McGilliard 

Van Horn Tompson Tilbury 




407 



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3a?l)awker Sa66le an.6 Sirloin (Hub 



Colors — Black and Gold 



Motto — "Better Livestock for Kansas." 



The Jayhawher Saddle and Sirloin Club is composed of Senior, Junior and Sopho- 
more students in the Animal Husbandry Department of the College. The purpose of 
the club is to promote the breeding of better livestock in Kansas. There are forty-four 
active members of the club. The meetings are held on the second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month during the college year. 

The first year's history of the club has been one of success. The first annual Jay- 
hawker Fair was held by the club on November sixth, nineteen hundred and fifteen. 
The club is laying plans for a larger and better fair to be held during the fall term. The 
second annual Stock Judging Contest was held February seventh, nineteen hundred and 
fifteen. One hundred and seventeen students entered the contest. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



W. B. Adair 
B. M. Anderson 
A. C. Apitz 
J. M. Aye 
O. O. Browning 
W. G. Bruce 
A. B. Brush 
G. H. Bunnel 
F. B. Cromer 
J. W. Crunbaker 
H. S. Collins 
J. B. Collister 
F. H. Dillenback 
H. H. Frizzell 
M. L. Gould 
P. B. Gwin 
Preston Hale 
L. S. Hodgson 
M. L. Holroyd 
E. L. Jenkins 
O. L. Johnson 



H. J. Waters 
W. A. Cochel 
E. N. Wentworth 
C. W. McCampbell 
C. M. Vestal 
A. M. Paterson 



R. G. Ketterman 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



E. Lawson 
J. L. Lush 
J. P. Loomis 

C. F. Mcllrath 
W. Mcllrath 

E. R. Martin 
L. E. McGinnis 
R. V. O'Neil 
W. J. Ott 
Earl Ramsey 
R. P. Ramsey 
W. R. Reeves 
R. J. Sedivy 

L. W. Taylor 
R. W. Taylor 
L. A. Williams 

F. A. Unruh 
W. L. Wilhoite 
W. H. Wilson 
J. S. Wood 

D. D. Bird 



Ray Gatewood 
L. R. Brady 
W. H. Rhodes 
I. L. Fowler 
Leslie Ross 
Crawford Smith 



408 



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1ft. S. -A,. (L Stock 3u6ging Oeam 





The greatest honor that can come to a student in Animal Husbandry at K. S. A. C, 
and the one for which all real live and ambitious students strive is a place on the stock 
judging team that represents K. S. A. C. at the American Royal and Int?rnational 
live stock shows held at Kansas City and at Chicago each year. A place on the team 
means a reward for efficient work in stock judging during the entire period of four years. 
It means that the members of the team have ranked high in the class room work and have 
shown in their judging work unusually good judgment and a practical knowledge of live 
stock. Teams from ten to fifteen of the leading Agricultural Colleges and Universities 
of the United States and Canada compete at the International each year. Kansas 
teams have won their share of the honors in these contests. The team that would have 
represented K. S. A. C. in 1914 gave unusual promise and it is very regrettable that the 
American Royal and International were both cancelled this year because of the outbreak 
of the foot and mouth disease. Had these shows been held, the Kansas boys would have 
won more glory and honor. 



410 



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X3l)£ iDair? Stock ^udginQ Oeam 




This is the fourth year that the Kansas State Agricultural College has been repre- 
sented at the National Dairy Show, held at Chicago, by a dairy stock judging team. 
The team this year won more honors than any previous team. 

The members of the team are chosen by Professor O. E. Reed and Assistant Profes- 
sor J. B. Fetch. The men on this year's team were: A. W. Aicher, J. W. Linn, V. F. 
Stuewe and alternate W. S. Morrow. Previous to the contest at Chicago, the team, ac- 
companied by Coach J. B. Fitch, visited the Dairy Congress at Waterloo, Iowa, and a 
number of farms in the dairy district of Wisconsin. This trip was for the purpose of 
further practice in judging, as well as being very instructive. 

At the contest at Chicago, the team competed against fifteen other teams represent- 
ing as many different agricultural colleges. The Kansas team won two silver loving 
cups, ranking second in judging all breeds and first in judging Ayrshire breed. Aside 
from this members of the team won individual honors, A. W. Aicher ranking third in 
judging the Guernsey breed, J. W. Linn, third in Ayrshire breed and V. F. Stuewe, 
second in Holstein breed and fourth highest individual, among the forty-eight con- 
testants. V. F. Stuewe received a gold medal for being fourth highest individual. 



MEMBERS OF DAIRY STOCK JUDGING TEAM 



A. W. Aicher 
J. W. Linn 



W. S. Morrow, Alternate 
J. B. Fitch, Coach 



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Agricultural Society 




Blain Crow 
P. J. England 
A. W. Griffith 
W. R. Gore 
L. R. Hiatt 
Carl Huffman 
C. L. Hedstrom 
F. B. Kelly 
Clare Kimpart 
R. W. May 
Ben Moore 



C. L. McFadden 
P. L. Netterville 
Dean Orr 
Thomas Pexton 
G. W. Rhine 

H. W. Schaper 
J. R. Wood 

D. C. Warner 

W. R. Worthington 
H. H. Zimmerman 
L. V. Rhine 




412 



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ACTIVE MEMBERS 

A. C. Arnold 

J. E. Bengtson, President 
C. A. Carter 

B. H. Cummings 
A. Douglas 

G. L. Farmer 

C. A. Frankenhoff 
W. S. Freeburg 

S. Fell 

A. H. Ganshird 
W. W. Haggard 
L. B. Garvin 
P. E. Jackson 
K. E. Kungon 
W. A. Lathrop 
Roy Meyers 

W. A. Buck 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Geo. Mawhirter 
J. I. Michaels 
H. E. Newhouse 
F. Pattison 
W. E. Patterson 
J. D. Parsons 
L. J. Rees 

F. R. Rawson 
W. L. Rhoades 
C. A. Soppin 
R. A. Shelley 
R. L. Swenson 

G. A. Sellers 
H. A. Wagner 
L. A. Wilsey 
C. W. Wyland 



Dean A. A. Potter, Honorary Chairman 



Prof. R. A. Seaton 
Prof. P. J. Freeman 
Prof. M. R. Bowerman 



Prof. S. L. Simmering 
Prof. Jacob Lund 
Prof. W. W. Carlson 



414 



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American Institute of Clectrical 
Engineers 

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL BRANCH 




OFFICERS 



Chairman 
Secretary 

C. E. Reid 



J. E. Alsop 
C. L. Archer 
R. G. Baker 
H. B. Brown 
H. E. Butcher 
W. E. Deal 
S. G. Fell 
L. V. Fickel 
G. L. Fitzgerald 
J. H. Flora 
L. C. Geisendorf 
M. P. Goudy 
L. G. Gross 
J. S. Hagan 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 



STUDENT MEMBERS 



L. V. Fickel 
C. E. Reid 



G. B. McNair 



C. T. Halbert 
W. K. Hervey 
C. A. Hooker 
CD. Hultgren 
P. E. Jackson 
T. K. Knowles 
H. D. Linscott 
W. J. Loomis 
P. C. Ringwalt 
H. E. Newhouse 

C. C. Smith 

H. W. Stockebrand 

D. C. Tate 

G. L. Usselman 



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(Tivil Cngineerius Society 





L. E. Conrad 
W. S. Gearhart 



F. E. Freeto 
C. B. Hickok 



G. S. Douglas 
F. E. Gilraore 
E. B. Goldsmith 
H. R. Johnson 



L. C. Bernard 
S. E. Croyle 
A. E. Dyatt 
G. W. Haege 

L. H. Bixby 
F. Ziegler 
W. A. Norman 
Frank Sisson 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Seniors 

G. A. Russell 
Jun iors 

L. A. Mingenback 
Sophomores 

Freshmen 



Harry Dunham 
416 



H. B. Walker 
F. F. Frazier 



G. A. Hopp 
W. Ramage 



L. A. Leonard 
R. F. Mirick 
L. C. Teeter 
G. N. Herron 



Elmer Johnson 
Harry Tyrrel 
John Carnahan 
A. C. Bux 

William Woolley 
Harry Batliner 
C. L. Caldwell 
J. R. Cook 



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_"'_'" 1 Ig3y_i:.'-Lii. ■ : ^——' ; ■-■■■, -— ~-±~Q 



Arcl)itectural (Hub 



President 

Vice-Presidenl ... 
Secretary-Treasurer 



L. M. Reudy 

H. L. Hurtt 

Mildred Hanna 



Dr. J. D. Walters 

Grace C. Averill 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

F. C. Harris 



STUDENT MEMBERS 



Stanley A. Smith 
Araminta Holman 



Stanley B. Baker 
George W. Christie 
Alvin T. Coith 
George C. Ferrier 
Otto B. Githens 
Mildred J. Hanna 
H. R. Horak 
J. A. Hull 
H. L. Hurtt 



Fred A. Korsmeier 
E. E. Moore 
Franklin I. Pomeroy 
L. M. Reudy 
Oliver K. Rumbel 
Robert E. Sellers 
Chas. W. Shaver 
Theadore Shuart 
E. W. Wilson 



H. B. King 



417 





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Oratorical ^&oard 



0. B. Burtis 
Arthur E. Hopkins 
Roy F. Hagans 
M. P. Goudy 

Alpha Beta 

Wallace D. Hutchinson 
Walter J. Ott 

Athenian 

Otto L. Hubp 
H. R. Sumner 

Browning 

Edith E. Arnold 
Effie May Carp 

Eurodelphian 
Edna Hawkins 
Lina Tulloss 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Franklin 

Roy F. Hagans 
Wilma Van Horn 

Hamilton 
Wellington Brink 
M. P. Goudy 

In, nail 

Isla Bruce 
Amy Gould 

Webster 

O. B. Burtis 
Arthur E. Hopkins 








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iDebating (Touncil 1914-15 




Alpha Beta 


Athenian 


Jas. M. Mc Arthur 


W. F. Taylor, President 


Mary Taylor 


J. V. Quigley, Treasurer 


Brownings 


Eurodelphians 


Eva Pease 


Mary E. Poison, Secretary 


Alta Hepler 


Wilma Burtis 


Franklins 


Hamiltons 


Elizabeth Demperwolf 


J. D. Parsons 


Elliot Ranney 


D. E. Hull, Vice-President 


lonians 


Websters 


Edna Barber 


W. B. Adair 


Martha Conrad 


W. T. White 




■■■. " . - s^^T ' 



419 



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Society C^ceum (Tourse 




The Society Lyceum Committee is composed of one representative from each of the 
eight Literary Societies of the College. 

This committee attends to the business management and secures the talent for the 
course. 

The course for the season 1914-1915 consisted of nine numbers, representing a total 
cost of two thousand five hundred dollars, which amount was fully covered by the sale 
of seats. 

Quantity is always sacrificed for quality in the choice of talent and the best talent 
of the Lyceum and Musical Bureaus is collected to form Kansas' strongest Lyceum 
course. 

For the past two seasons the committee has added a special attraction in the 
"Woodland Players" during the spring term. 



OFFICERS 



Ray H. Whitenack 
Gertrude Wunder .... 
P. D. Buchanan 



Ruth Adams 
Valeda Downing 
Gertrude Wunder 
H. R. Sumner 



COMMITTEE 



Chairman 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



P. D. Buchanan 
W. C. Calvert 
Chas. Zimmerman 
Ray H. Whitenack 




Vorsitzcnoer, Xouis M. Ximper 
Scbriftfubrerin, 3tt. Xcuisa Ziller Scbatzmeisterin, 2\nna Scblegel 



Claire 3M6oison 
2\vis 3Main 
Wellington Srink 
3obn V. Cortclyou 
Vilona (Tutler 
Olio 2>elfs 
Juanita Xngel 
M. A. Gebrke 
Xstber (Sjgax 
Viola Kepler 



Xouis H. Ximper 
2\nna Xora Jttiller 
Cecil Sttiller 
3ttarj> Jttoss 
2\nna ^lecr 
Xstber yielson 
Helen A. palmer 
Annette perry 
5Itarie Pickrell 
Helen Pitcairn 
3ttabel Hinos 



25ertba ploog 
Mabel 3W 
2\nna Scblegel 
Blanche Oanner 
Sopbia Oimpe 
Dais? Oolbert 
Harriet Ward 
36a Wilson 
tftettie Wismer 
ytl. Xouisa Ziller 




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^tewman (Hub 




The Newman Club, a Catholic organization, has for its purpose literary work and 
social activities. The club has provided a rooming house, located at 521 North 11th 
Street, for the Catholic young men of the College. This house is also used for the 
Club's headquarters. 



Rev. A. J. Luckey 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Mr. J. T. Lardner 



Mr. Brakeman 



MEMBERS 






Laura Becker 
Mary Blackman 
Pauline Clarke 
John Collister 
Lucretia Coughlin 
John Clark 
Kathleen Conroy 
Clifford Day 
Elizabeth Dempewolf 
Bessie Fitts 
Josie Griffith 
B. F. Geiger 
Edwin Geary 
Alma Hamaker 
Lucy Hamilton 
Glenn Holford 



Gertrude McQuaid 
Mary Moss 

Edward Joseph Quinlan 
Joseph Vincent Quigley 
Thomas Shaughnessy 
Dennis Sculley 
Jule Shaughnessy 
Aloysius Slattery 
Andrew Stinger 
Giles Sullivan 
Arthur Walker 
Irene Walker 
William Wiebler 
Peter Weisbeck 
George Walsh 
Edith Walsh 



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422 




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Ol)e (Toiler (Blee (Hub 




I 



Top Row: Mingle, Woolley, Thackery, Gregory, Mullen, Pickrell 
Middle Row: Lyons, Gardner, Whitenack, Jordan, Smith, Dudley. 
Bottom Row: Andrews, MeElvain, Carnahan, Cave, Dyatt 



Olaf Valley, Director 



First Tenors 
L. D. Gardner 
K. Dudley 
H. W. Cave 
J. R. Mingle 
W. L. Thackery 

Second Tenors 
G. C. Smith 
B. M. Andrews 
F. M. Pickrell 
A. E. Dyatt 



First Basses 
Paul Carnahan 

D. W. Woolley 

E. Gregory 
D. V. Jordan 

Second Basses 
R. M. Mullen 

D. M. MeElvain 

E. S. Lyons 

R. H. Whitenack 




423 



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Annual Play 



(Tollege ^Dramatic (Hub 

MONDAY, MARCH 1, 1915 

A FARCE COMEDY 

By James Henry Darnley 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Rev. John Smith, Curate of St. Andrews 

John Smith, the "Other Mr. Smith" 

Dick Desmond, the "Other Mr. Smith's" Guest 

Col. Duncan Smith, the "Other Mr. Smith's" Uncle 

Sergeant Duffell, of Vine Street Police Station 

Mabel, the Curate's Wife ....... 

Nora, the "Other Mr. Smith's" Wife 

Miss Fotheringay, of the Bijou Theater 

Mrs. Ponting, the "Other Mr. Smith's" Housekeeper 



Mr. A. T. Coith 

Mr. L. M. Hanna 

Mr. C. E. Lovett 

Mr. P. D. Buchanan 

Mr. E. E. Giles 

Miss Pauline Clarke 

Miss Lois Noyes 

Miss Corinne Myers 

Miss Emma E. Evans 



The action of the play takes place in the "Other Mr. Smith's" flat, No. 19 Mona 
Mansion, Kensington. There are three John Smiths — the Rev. John Smith, John 
Smith, and Col. Duncan Smith. They are all connected with a mansion of flats in 
Kensington, and hopeless muddles are extracted from this fact. 

ACT I— Before breakfast, 10 o'clock. 

ACT II — After breakfast, 10:40 o'clock, same morning. 

ACT III — Before lunch, 11:30 o'clock, same morning. 



MUSIC BY COLLEGE ORCHESTRA 

UNDER DIRECTION OF PROF. R. H. BROWN 

Dramatic production under general direction of Prof. A. E. Shower 
Stage furniture contributed by Paine Furniture Company 



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College iDramatic (Hub 







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^lack Ifelmet iDancing Club 





Elks' Hall, 1914-1915 





Black Helmet Dances, Friday Evenings 

October sixteenth 
November sixth 
November twenty-seventh 
December eighteenth 
January eighth 
January twenty-ninth 
February nineteenth 
March twelfth 
April second 
April twenty-third 




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._^_ 



(Barcia dancing (Hub 



Harold Goble 
J. V. Hepler 
E. R. Martin 
K. G. Baker 
G. H. Chittenden 
R. N. Walker 




Aggieville Hall 
Kipp's Orchestra 



H. B. Dudley 
R. C. Erskine 
Harry Vauple 
Evan Jenkins 
J. E. Hammond 
E. R. McGalliard 



E. L. Smith 




V^fcg* 



428 



d 




I 



Chittenden Martin Goble 

Vauple Hepler Hammond McGalliard 

Jenkins Erskine Baker 




" 




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John Kiene 
C. H. Honeywell 
A. H. Pearson 
W. Pike 

C. J. Etherington 
R. G. Davis 
Geo. Miller 
F. J. Nettleton 
C. F. Medlin 
Roy Glover 
H. J. Batliner 
P. L. Netterville 
F. D. Kimport 
Clare Kimport 
Jay Lush 
E. M. Cox 



Roy Glover 
Paul Robinson 
S. W. Honeywell 
R. V. Medlen 
E. H. Teagarden 
R. E. Saxton 
E. A. Billings 
W. G. Oehrle 
J. E. Williamson 
H. E. Rahe 
H. Nelson 
Peter Weisebeck 
R. E. Coates 
J. W. Worthington 
N. A. McCoch 
L. D. LaTourrette 



F. E. Clark 




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Ol)£ Stu6ent (Touncil 





The Student Council is the connecting link between the students and faculty. It 
is that adjusting factor that may be seemingly unimportant, but which is really in- 
dispensable. 

The members are: 

Seniors 
J. W. Linn, President L. M. Nabours 



Edna 


Barber, 


Secretary-Treasurer 


Mary Gurnea 


Mary 


Poison 




Juniors 


J. R. 


Mason 






0. 


B. Burtis, Vice-President 




LaurE 


i Ramsey 


Sophomores 


L. V. 


Rhine 








Freshman 












CD. Roach 












Faculty Adviser 












J. 0. Hamilton 








431 



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iDair? Seniors 





Ollie Ezekiel Reed, Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

Albert William Aicher, AZ, Webster, Scarab, Dairy Association. 

Otto L. Hubp, AZ, Athenian, Dairy Association. 

James W. Linn, Scabbard and Blade, Hamilton, Royal Purple Staff, Dairy Association 

William S. Morrow, 2AE, rii, Dairy Association. 

VICTOR F. STUEWE, AZ, Hamilton, Dairy Association. 

Graydon Tilbury, Hamilton, Dairy Association. 

George W. Williams, Webster, Dairy Association. 

Harry H. Wilson, Webster, Dairy Association. 




IiiI|iIiiiIIIiI||||IiIiIIIIIIIIiiihiiiiimiimiiiii>:"'- 



432 



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',.-; ■ ■ ■ ■■..!:■,„. ■ ■ . ^iWki^L— ^JJ "II[|| lllllll||IIIIHI|l|lllll | | IJ IIII|l 



publications 



!&eneatr) tl>c men entirely great 

Orjc pen is mightier ttjan tt)e sworfc. " 

— Bulwer-Lytlon. 



■T ■ n~; Iff 1 1 J ■ ■ ■ : 







1915 floral purple Staff 




'And we penned 

It down, until at last it came to be. 
The bigness which you see." 

— Bunyan 



Business Manager. 

Editor 

Advertising Manager 

Treasurer 

Sates Manager 
Assistant Editor 

Artist, 

Assistant Artist 

Athletics Editor 
Class Editor 
Assistant. Class Editor 

Organization Editor 

Editor of Point, Pun, and Quip 
Assistant Editor 
Assistant Editor 

Calendar 

Secretary 



W. J. Loomis 

W. N. Skourup 

L. B. Mann 

W. F. Smith 

F. M. Layton 

F. W. Johnson 

C. W. Shaver 

W. A. Hagan 

E. H. Smith 

M. P. Goudy 

Bernice Wilson 

J. W. Linn 

Meta Sheaff 

Louise Walbridge 

Katharine Laing 

Eva Hostetler 

Mary Gurnea 




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~ 



3\o?al purple Jpopularit? Contest 





Walter F. Smith 
The Most Popular Man 



Ruth Hill 
The Most Popular Woman 



ELECTED BY THE POPULAR VOTE OF THE STUDENT BODY. 



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"Kansas State (Tollegian 




EDITORIAL STAFF 



Editor 

Associate Editor . 
Sport Editor 
Society Editor 



Tom Blackburn 

Frank Sargent 

Erie H. Smith 

Edith M. Updegraff 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager ..... Erie H. Smith 

Circulation Manager.. Paul D. Buchanan 

Advertising Manager Dorian P. Ricord 



Zeno C. Rechels 
Gladys Craig 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 



E. S. Lyons 



Walter F. Smith 
Madge Thompson 



436 



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Ol)e IKatisas lfn6ustrtaUst 



The Kansas Industrialist is the official weekly publication of the Kansas State 
Agricultural College. Established in 1875, shortly after vocational courses were first 
introduced into the institution, the paper has been published continuously during the 
school years since that time and has become a potent force in the dissemination both of 
important college news and of valuable agricultural and industrial information through- 
out the state and elsewhere. 

The President of the College, Henry Jackson Waters, LL. D., is editor-in-chief of 
The Industrialist. Prof. N. A. Crawford is managing editor. Dr. J. D. Walters has fcr 
many years been local editor. 



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Ol)e 1ft. S. .A. <L Cngiueer 



Published once each term during the college year, by the Engineers' Association of 
the Kansas State Agricultural College. 

STAFF 

W. A. Lathrop, '15 Editor 

F. R. Rawson, '16 .... Assistant Editor 

P. E. Jackson, '15 Business Manager 

J. S. Hagan, '16 Assistant Business Manager 

R. A. Graves, '17 Advertising Manager 

Reporters for Engineering Societies 
L. A. Wilsey, '16, Student Branch of American Society of 

Mechanical Engineers. 
S. G. Fell, '15, Student branch of American Institute of 

Electrical Engineers. 
F. H. Freeto, '15, Student Branch of Society of Civil 

Engineers. 
C. W. Shaver, '15, Architectural Club. 

Advisory Editors 
A. A. Potter, S. B., Dean of Division of Engineering. 
N. A. Crawford, A. M., Department of Industrial Journalism. 

Subscription price, fifty cents a year in advance. 

Address all communications, and make orders payable to The K. S. A. C. En- 
gineer, Manhattan, Kansas. 



'■'h;i!Hliiiii"" ; 




I3l)e Spotlit 



Published semi-monthly. 

Five cents the copy. No subscriptions. 

If it isn't copyright, blame the printer. 

No Postoffice entered. 

Motto — "Every Knock's a Boost." 




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MEARLY 





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PRUtlH 




TAILOR-MAIDS 



YOU 0U6MT TO 



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Ol)e ^platform 



" Or>e world's a stage—as Sbakespeare sa'xb one da?, 

Ol)e stage a worlo is, was wt)at fye meant to sav." 

— Holmes. 




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Howtt vs. IK. S. .A. <T. 

South Dakota, November 13, 1914 

Resolved: That Immigration to the United States should be further restricted by 
a Literacy Test. 



Affirmative 

Florence Justin 

J. V. Quigley 

J. B. Sweet, Captain 

J. M. McArthur, Alternate 



Negative 
L. V. Rhine 
J. L. Lush, Captain 
J. P. Rathbun 
0. K. Rumbel, Alternate 



= 





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(Tolora6o vs. 1ft. S. ^A. (T. 

Oklahoma, March 23, 1915 

Resolved: That all able-bodied men in the United States should perform one 
year's continuous military service before attaining the age of twenty-five. 



Affirmative 
J. V. Quigley 
J. B. Sweet, Captain 



Negative 
Shelby G. Fell 
Jay L. Lush, Captain 



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1ft. S. A. <L vs. ^asl)burn 



March 30, 1915 

Resolved: That within a reasonable time the United States should grant inde- 
pendence to the Philippine Islands. 



Affirmative 
W. F. Taylor 
J. M. McArthur, Captain 
0. E. Smith 



Negative 
Stella Gould 
Mary E. Poison 
Lulu G. Davis, Captain 
Flora A. Morris, Alternate 





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1ft. S. -A.. <L, vs. Iftansas WesUvatt l£niversitv 

April 9, 1915 

Resolved: That Immigration to the United States should be further restricted 
by a literacy test. 



Affirmative 
Mary Dakin 

Ina Belle Wilson, Captain 
Mae Sweet 
Kathrina Munger, Alternate 



Negative 
Marion P. Fowler 
Rose Baker 

Madge Thompson, Captain 
Mary L. Taylor, Alternate 




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_ ©t>) 




1ft. S. ^A. <T. vs. ^ftaker Kniversitv 

April 23, 1915 
Resolved: That within a reasonable time the United States should grant indepen- 
dence to the Philippine Islands. 

Affirmative Negative 

W. B. Adair J. P. Rathbun, Captain 

B. F. Griffin R. D. Thompson 

V. E. Bundy, Captain G. W. Rhine 

G. C. Smith, Alternate E. Billings, Alternate 

L. Jewett, Alternate R. S. Orr, Alternate 

W. L. Wilhoite, Alternate 





Hi. 5. -A. <l. vs. Hiansas State format School 

May 7, 1915 
Resolved: That the Federal Government should own and operate the Telegraph 
and Telephone systems of the United States. 

Affirmative 
D. E. Hull 
J. W. Barker 
Floyd Hawkins, Captain 



'■■' !:■■■■ 




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15th ANNUAL INTER-SOCIETY 



Oratorical (Tontest 




FEBRUARY 20, 1915 
Ex-Governor Hoch, Presiding 



Devotion 



Reverend Lehew 



Franklin Society 
The Reveries of a Bachelor 
The Last Invasion 



Hamilton Society 



"Nish-Ti-Toki-Misi" 
The Last Span 



Franklins 
Jay Lush 



Hamiltons 
Don Irwin 



Ionian Society 



The First Quarrel 
Peace or War 



EURODELPHIAN SOCIETY 



The Soldier's Dream 
Our Social Obligation 

Browning Society 
The Highwayman 
Woman's Place in International Peace 

Alpha Beta Society 
Irish Memories 
The Mission of America 

Athenian Society 
Board of Administration Meeting 
The Modern Prodigal 

Webster Society 
German Goose Step Drill 
The Debt 

Society Demonstrations 
Judges' Report 
Presentation of Medals 



Ionians 
Amy Gould 



Eurodelphians 
Emma Taylor 



Brownings 
Erne Carp 



Alpha Betas 
Walter Ott 



Athenians 
Paul Loomis 



Websters 
V. E. Bundy 




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Hater-Society tfarcz 





The Literary Societies of The Kansas State Agricultural College 
Present 

"3immie in ^P under lan6" 

AN ORIGINAL FARCE IN FOUR ACTS 

WRITTEN AND STAGED BY THE AUTHORIZATION OF THE 



INTER-SOCIETY COUNCIL 



•Jimmie Linn 
Gertrude Wunder 
Don Irwin 
Miss Groves 
"Shorty" Fowler 
Jack Richards 
President Waters 
Mrs. Waters 
Doctor Holt 
Mary Nixon 
Lawrence O'Brien 
Giggling Girl 



Ralph Ferguson 

Wilma Burtis 

Wilbur Wright 

Edna Barber 

T. K. Vincent 

Zeno Rechel 

J. H. Loomis 

Emma Stratton 

J. D. Hungerford 

Marion Keys 

W. F. Taylor 

Lois Stewart 



Y. M. C. A. Boys.— H. Bayer, M. L. Coe, Wm. Woolley, P. A. Car- 
nahan, W. F. Taylor, John Hungerford, J. H. Loomis, Clifford S. 
Rude. 

Y. W. C. A. Girls.— Juanita Engle, Grace Willits, Mary Wieble, Emily 
Wilson, Louisa Ziller, Lois Bellomy, Rose Baker, Vilona Cutler, 
Mayme Wartenbee. 

Business Manager O. E. Smith 

Direction of the cast by Miss Stratton and Zeno Rechel. 

449 



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PRESENTS 



13 be 3ttika6o 



OR 
"THE TOWN OF TITIPU" 
A Comic Opera in Two Acts, by Sir. W. S. Gilbert and Sir A. Sullivan. 



DRAMATIS PERSONAE 



The Mikado of Japan 

Nanki Poo, his son 

Ko Ko, Lord High Executioner 

Pooh Bah, Lord Everything Else 

Pish Tush, a Noble Lord 

Yumm Yum j Three Sisters, / 

Pitti Sing > Wards of / 

Peep Bo ) Ko Ko ( 

Katisha, an Elderly Lady in Love with Nanki Poo 
School Girls, Nobles, Guards and Coolies. 

450 



J. S. McBride 

E. M. Peck 

Z. Rechel 

R. J. Taylor 

R. B. Hood 

Margaret Anna Couch 

Josephine Perrill 

Isla Bruce 

Nita Welsh 



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fifth -Annual Junior-Senior 



nmff 



May 29, 1914 
THE BANQUET 
Nichol's Gymnasium at Nine P. M. 



Walter Smith 



Toastmaster 



THE SPEAKERS 

Address of Welcome to the Seniors 

Response 

Toast to the Juniors 

Toast to the Seniors 

Presentation of the Shepherd's Crook 

Acceptance of the Crook 



Mary Inez Mann 

Margaret Blanchard 

Russell Williamson 

W. H. Wilson 

W. L. Sweet 

W. N. Skourup 



THE FARCE 



"Senior Spasms" 



Frank Root 
Claude Arbuthnot 
M. H. Borst 
Parke Lillard 
John McBride 
Edna Coith 
Marguerite Walbridge 
Alma Halbower 
Nelle Reed 
Bess Hoffman 



Don Irwin 

W. N. Skourup 

R. C. Erskine 

W. F. Smith 

Calvin Hooker 

Eleanor Patrick 

Amy Gould 

Edna Barber 

. Frieda Stuewe 

Meta Sheaff 



453 




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ytlay fiXo. 




The May Fete was first given in the spring of 1911 under the auspices of the Y. W. 
C. A. The participants of the May Fete program are the members of the various 
organizations of the college. 

The May Day fills a place in our College life that brings forth the real Spirit of the 
people of Kansas as no other event can. Events of this kind serve to develop a greater 
zeal for our institution, to unite the students through a common interest and to create 
a more active Alumni spirit. 





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Way IFete 





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Ol)e .first Annual 3a^b<iwKer fair 





The Jayhawker Fair is an annual event staged by the Jayhawker Saddle and 
Sirloin Club. The proceeds of the Fair go toward the defraying of the expenses of the 
Stock Judging Team to the Inter-National Stock Show at Chicago. 

At the Fair we enjoyed the Baby Show, the side shows, the Trip Hammer "Goat," 
the clowns, the wonderful Band and the many other forms of amusement. Yes — and 
the peanuts and popcorn. 




FIRST ANNUAL 

^tyletic Carnival 

College Gymnasium. Monday night, March 8, 1915, commencing at 8:00 p. m. 

Pari One 
Wand Drill Girls 

Athletic Dancing Men 

40-yard High Hurdles (special, for school record),, Frizzell, Welsh 

Special Apparatus Holladay, Copple 

Wrestling (Middleweight) Long and Gehrke, Gilmore and Haege 

Pole Vault Edwards 

Pillow Fight Fraternity Freshmen 

Inter-Battalion Relay 

Wheelbarrow Race Hamiltons vs. Websters 

Special 440-yard Dash. Coith, Lovett, Holroyd, Crumbaker, Osborne 
Original Stunt Franklins 

Inter-Fraternity Relay. 

Ten Minutes' Intermission — Music by the Band 
Special Bicycle Race — Haucke, Briney 
The Yavapai Club (Special) 



Part Two 

Folk Dancing: a. Bulgarian Dance; b. 

Burlesque Boxing 

Special Apparatus (Parallels) 

Special Half-Mile Race 

Original Stunt 

Obstacle Relay 

Original Stunt 

Russian Folk Dance. 

Original Stunt 

Boxing: 

a. Lightweight, two rounds 

b. Middleweight, two rounds 

c. Battle Royal 

Tumbling and Pyramids 
Inter-Sorority Relay 
Wrestling, Heavyweight (no time limit) 
Visit the Candy Booth 



Jack Tar. 

Fraternity Freshmen 

Holladay, Copple, Garvey 

Weaver, Wilder, Cromer 

Athenians 

Fat Men 

Girls' Rooter Club 

Alpha Betas 



Alsop and Franz 
Hit the Baby Freshman 



BAND CONCERT AT 7:30 P. M. 

457 



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Olof Valley, Director 
Luverne Landon, Accompanist 
"THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE" 

OR 
"THE SLAVE OF DUTY" 




A Comic Opera, in Two Acts 
By Sir W. S. Gilbert and Sir Arthur Sullivan 
College Auditorium 
Friday Evening, May 21, 1915, at 8:00 o'clock 







TTTTTTTTmIIII 



DRAMATIS PERSONAE 

Richard, a Pirate Chief E. R. Martin 

Samuel, his Lieutenant P- A. Carnahan 

Frederic, a Pirate Apprentice J. R. Carnahan 

Major-General Stanley, of the British Army G. C. Smith 

Edward, a Sergeant of Plice D. W. Woolley 

Mabel, General Stanley's Youngest Daughter Clare Biddison 

Kate General Mildred Batchelor 

Edith Stanley's Isla Bruce 

Isabel Daughters Nyle Lewallen 

Ruth, a Piratical "Maid-of-all-work" Sara Marty 
General Stanley's Daughters, Pirates, Policemen, etc. 

Prof. A. E. Shower Dramatic Coach 

D. M. McElvain Business Manager 

R. H. Whitenack Property Man 

458 

_^p|l pil iiiiiiniiiin 

42UL PURPgi 





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'' 




Ol)e School of .Agriculture 




The School of Agriculture is two years old, and 
this issue of Royal Purple finds the school just beginning 
to want to speak for itself. To be sure, it hasn't a great 
deal to say as yet, like other new things it must promise 
for the future rather than point to the past. 

For a long time the people of the State forgot that 
many boys and girls could not afford four years of high 
school work and then four years of College work. We 
forgot that girls who were to be housekeepers in the 
modest home could have happier and better families if 
they were trained to cook well, to sew and plan clothes 
that were more desirable and more durable, and finally 
were so artistic in their tastes that they could make 
even the simple home a beautiful place in which to live. 
When we awoke to the fact that boys and girls in these 
walks of life were worth caring for and making into 
efficient citizens, we began planning the work of the School of Agriculture. 

We were not to look to past ideals of high school or preparatory work, but were to 
consider the social and economic needs of the great group of people who can spend only 
a few years getting ready for their life's work. We were to make productive workmen 
and good citizens of them, and at the same time to fit them to take advantage of every 
chance for promotion in the future. This the School of Agriculture is trying to do. 

There are two courses for boys: Agriculture and Mechanic Arts; and a course in 
Home Economics for girls. In each course the first year's work is most largely voca- 
tional. The cultural and citizenship training increases in amount in the later years of 
the courses. 

The students of the School are, in the main, young men and women who could not go 
directly from the rural or graded schools to high school, but who were out of school for 
a time and now enter school with an earnestness of purpose, a maturity of thought and 
an ability to work which is not found in the ordinary type of secondary school. 

The School is finding its place and reaching its people. It is fitting them economic- 
ally and socially, and at the same time preparing them to spend their future leisure time 
most helpfully. There are three literary societies, debating clubs, and athletic teams 
to which students of the School are eligible and in which they are taking an active part. 
They unite with the College students in Christian Associations and other student 
enterprises. 

Slowly and surely the School of Agriculture is finding its place in the inner life of 
the great white city on the hill, and just as surely its graduates, the first of whom go out 
this year, will find their place in the busy productive life of the State of which they are 
proud and which they hope to serve most acceptably as future citizens. 



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X3l)e School of .Agriculture 

(9ra$uation (Tlass 



E. B. Stewart 

L. W. Kennedy 
D. C. Thayer 

Alice Williams 

Edwin H. Patterson 




461 






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Ol)e School of Agriculture 

ol)ir6 Vear (Tlass 



President. 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer.. . 
Marshal 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Marshal 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 
Marshal 



OFFICERS 



Fall Term 



Winter Term 



Spring Term 



Edna Mitchell 

Clifford Jones 

R. F. Coffey 

Bertha Holladay 

J. J. Seright 



B. E. Gleason 

Nivels Pearson 

E. M. Cox 

S. W. Honeywell 

Arthur Burditte 



W. L. Scully 

W. B. Palmer 

E. B. Stewart 

John Anderson 

C. P. Neiswender 



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Ol)e School of .Agriculture 



Second Vcar (Tlass 



\2^±=s^ 



OFFICERS 



Fall Term 



President... 
Vice- President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Marshal 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Marshal . 



Winter Term 



G. R. Giles 

H. H. Beaman 

H. E. Moody 

J. L. Jameron 

N. E. Howard 



Wm. Giles 

W. G. Oehole 

Sarah M. Dewey 

Fred Robb 

George Hinds 




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Ol)e School of .Agriculture 




Ol>e Glass of Nineteen Hun£>re6 Seventeen 




Class Motto — Success through Honesty 



Class Colors — Maroon and Gold 



This class consists of about two hundred students in the School of Agriculture. 
The first meeting for the organization of the class was held October 1, 1914. At this 
meeting the following committee was appointed to draw up the constitution: 



W. D. Pierce 

D. E. Longenwalter 



H. D. Rothrock 



Robert Burns 
C. E. Burton 



The constitution was drawn up, adopted by the class and the following officers were 
elected for the fall term: 



President ....... Robert Burns Marshal H. I. May 

Vice-President . D. E. Longenwalter Assistant Marshal H. D. Rothrock 

Treasurer Alta B. Siegel Class Historian W.D.Pierce 

Secretary Katherine M. Chor Class Reporter J. O. Bircher 
Students Council Agnes Hunt, D. E. Longenwalter 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Officers for Ike Winter Term 



D. E. Longenwalter 

W. D. Pierce 

Sarah I. Reynolds 

Ruth Murphy 



Marshal 

Assistant Marshal 
Class Historian 
Class Reporter 



F. A. Gleason 

Luciele Yost 

H. I. May 

Knoedler 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



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Officers for the Spring Term 

H. D. Rothrock Marshal W. C. Mills 

H. I. May Assistant Marshal Lydia Senn 

Luciele Yost Class Historian... A. L. Heisel 

Alta B. Siegel Class Reporter W. A. Atchison 



Athletic Manager 



Robert Burns 



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(Burls basket ^all 




Avis Blaine 
Margaret Chapman 
Amanda Olson 
Jessie Husband 
Eva Gwin 



Cleda Taylor 
Alta Seigel 
Lucile Yost 
Ruth McClanahan 
Kathryn Chor 



465 




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Tincolit Citerar? Society 



Motto — "Knowledge is Our Goal" 



OFFICERS 



Fall Term 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary. 

Treasurer 

Critic 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critic 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary. 

Treasurer 

Critic 



Winter Term 



Spring Term 



George E. Kennedy 

A. E. Cook 

J. G. Stutz 

Chester Scott 

George Giles 

R. F. Coffey 



J. G. Stutz 

Chester Scott 

R. F. Coffey 

E. P. Neiswender 

A. N. Jones 

R. B. Medlin 



Clifford Jones 

F. C. Flora 

W. D. Scully 

W. B. Palmer 

Roy Glover 

H. E.Smith 



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flbilomatl)iaR literary Society 



Motto — "Learn to Live and Live to Learn' 



Colors — Blue and Gold 



Emblem — Marguerite ^3 



Presidents for the Year 1914-1915 

FallTerm Rose Straka 

Winter Term Nellie Yantis 

Spring Term Minnie Peppiatt 



MEMBERS 



Nora Crotinger 
Edna Hoke 
Edna Mitchell 
Ethel Gorton 
Amanda Olson 
Esther Olson 
Minnie Peppiatt 
Mary Redden 
Rose Straka 
Abbie Swafford 
Nellie Yantis 
Maggie Ellis 
Freda Haslam 
Bertha Holladay 
Alice Williams 



Mabel Niehenke 
Gladys Owen 
Vilda Stewart 
China Rogers 
Lydia Senn 
Edith Alexander 
Bess Carp 
Ruth McClenahan 
Barry Jones 
Emma Stutz 
Dorothy White 
Drulla Mall 
Avis Blain 
Lottie Carp 
Alice Hawkins 



Jessie Husband 



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In the fall term of the year 1914 some students saw the need of a mixed literary 
society of the School of Agriculture. Accordingly they met on November 7, 1914, and 
organized the Hesperian Literary Society. This society has become in the short period 
of its existence one of the leading societies of the School of Agriculture. 



H'fesperkm Clterar? Society 



OFFICERS 

Fall Term Winter Term 

President Cledas Taylor Cledas Taylor 

Vice-President Wm. Giles W. A. Naher 

Miss Guismer 

Recording Secretary W. A. Naher W. D. Pierce 

Corresponding Secretary Miss Wismer Anna Poland 

Treasurer E. M. Cox H. I. May 

Critic Helen E. Schneider F.A.Brown 



Bertha Atlas 
Margaret Ashton 
J. L. Atkinson 
Ethel Bennett 

D. M. Braum 
Lawrence Buckley 
F. A. Brown 
Robert Burns 
Margaret Chapman 
Margaret Calwell 

E. M. Cox 
Wm. Giles 
Bertha Gwin 
Edith Gwin 
Eva Gwin 



MEMBERS 

Mr. Hebre 

A. L. Heisel 

Ercil Hoke 

Merten Hoke 

S. W. Honeywell 

Esther Huschsall 

E. G. Kneadler 

H. I. May 

Roy H. McConachie 

Iva Mullen 

R. M. Mullen 

W. A. Naher 

W. H. Oehrle 

Roy Parker 

W. D. Pierce 

470 



Spring Term 
W. G. Oehrle 
Edith Riley 

Ethel Bennett 
Helen E. Schneider 
W. D. Pierce 
Robert Burns 



Anna Poland 
Edith Riley 
Fred Robb 
G. E. Ruggles 
Josie Ruggles 
Lula Ruggles 
Helen E. Schneider 
J. E. Smid 
J. F. Smid 
Abe Steele 
O. P. Steele 
Cleda Taylor 
Peter Weisbeck 
Daisy Wiseman 
Rebecca Wismer 



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Hfesperian 





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RIGHT ABOUT 



NOT FOR PUBLICATION. FACE. 




ASM GIFFIN. 



VETS. 



MMhJ 

TAKE YOUR PICK. 



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HALT! Advance and give the Cosine. 




Say — UNION — Before you can pass me. 



CHECK. 



What we felt like saying as a Foreword: We worked like H on this book and 

we hope that you D — — critics will appreciate it. We know it is good. 

The Editors. 




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W " 



- 




Sept. 28. Ags get their first experi- 
ence of running the level. 




<<y 



Oct. 3. Football season opens. 
Aggies beat Southwestern 14 — 0. 




Oct. 7. Dr. Nabours spoke in chapel, 
'Dodging Hades to get home." 




Oct. 17. Chas. J. Dillon speaks in 
chapel. Aggies play Nebraska. 




Nov. 12. Bill Hagan administers 
the medicine. 

Nov. IS. Same horse dies. 




Nov. 18. Jack Richards gets his 
calling. 

Lieut. Hill: Mr. Richards, if you 
cannot keep your hat on any other 
way, cut a notch in your head or tie 
the string to a splinter. 



478 



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the fluctuations of the K. C. wheat 
market prices. 



March 8. Calvin and Meta repeat 
by request the performance of De- 
cember 4, 1914. 





March 16. Hubp gets in bad with 
the Dairy Department. 



Feb. 22. HOLIDAY. 
Feb. 22. Brewer makes a snappy 
run to the first hour classes. 




• — i 



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April 1. King vanquishes Mike at 
Tennis. 



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Feb. 22. 0. E. leads the Minuete 



April 2. Dick Wilson demonstrates 
the Rajah's Glide. 



480 



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May 3. Dean Willard 
takes a stroll to improve 
his mind. Attempt nearly 
proves fatal. 



April 6. Baseball season opens with 
Bethany College. 

Same Day. Buck Smith has a bad 
tummy ache (Don't try to get the 
connection because there isn't any). 





EIApril 2Jf. Ferrier pitches to the 
Iov 



Iowa Aggies. 





May 7. Oklahoma-Aggie track 
meet. Baird wins the two-mile. 



May 10. Little 
Willie Barker ar- 
rives late at inspec- 
tion being detained 
at the Phi Phi 
house. 



April 25. Track team takes its daily 
workout. 




I '; 



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May 31 . Last copy to press. Royal 
Purple Committee takes a rest. 



May 21. Track meet with K. U. ; 
Aggies win by 3 points, 56-53. 







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Isles: How much of this lesson do you know, Miss Greeman? 

Louise: Some of it. 

Isles: If spelled S-U-M the total would be very small. 

Mr. Greenfield: May I have a schedule sheet? 
Registrar: We do not give them to Freshmen. 
Greenfield: Beg pardon, I'm assistant Prof, in Chemistry. 

Overheard at Wolf's Studio— Govvy: Say, I don't want such a large portrait. 
Wolf: Alright, just keep your mouth shut. 

Don Irwin in class meeting explaining plans for the Senior party stated that it would 
work out for large bodies. We wonder if it would apply to "Fat" Hooker. 

For good literature ask Herb Miller to show you the letter he found that Dorthy 
had written Dudley. — Be more careful after this Dee. 

Miss Harker: "Make the cellar door large enough for the ordinary person to 
go through, — well, larpe enough for a barrel." 

Prof. Nabours (in Parasitology class): "The lesson for tomorrow will cover the 
Family Pediculidae, Genus Pediculus, the common body louse." 

Mary Gurnea: "But Professor, I'm trying to get specimens of everything that 
we study. Where can I get a specimen of this family?" 

Nabours: "Search me!" 

Reisener: "Give an example of Pain Pressure.'' 
Geo. Gibbons: "Trying to keep awake in class." 

W. W. Haggard had good intentions when he slipped the waitress at the D. S. a 
quarter. 

Latest German War puzzle: 

HMTDYWTKTKA 

Dramatis Personae 
George'Herbert Bunnel (Returning from date with Miss Clara Robbins). 
Davie 

Walt Sleeping Occupants. 
Till 

SCENE I. 831 Osage Street. Time: 2:30 a. m. 

Enter, Bunnel, with shoes in hand, softly tip-toes upstairs and prepares to retire. 

SCENE II. Bed Chamber. Time 2:32 a. m. 

Davie and Walt in the Hay. Davie with one eye open discovers a burglar in 
Bunnel's study room. 

Davie (shaking Walt): "WALT! WALT! Wake up, there's some one in Bunnel s 
room." Walt springs to the floor, runs to the bureau and secures revolver. Peaking 
slowly around the corner, with gun ready, he discovers burglar standing in hallway. 

Walt (in loud voice): "STOP! I have the drop on you." 

Davie and Walt (in "unison): "TILL, BUNNEL, TILL, BUNNEL, there's 
some guy in your room." 

Enter Till alone and turns on light. 

Walt (supposing burglar had re-entered room): "Now, boys, let's all charge 
together." 

Bunnel (standing with back against door): "OH! — er— XX— XX** — I w-as 
ju-st wi-nd-in-g th-e cl-o-ck." 

SCENE III. Back to the Hay. Time 2:55 a. m. 

Till (in bed, but not asleep) "You, just getting in!" 



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SPOTLIGHT 




VOL I. 



JANUARY 28, 1915 



NO. 1 



The 1915 Class Book Committee is surely following almost in the footsteps of the 
'14 bunch only we hear that they have not burned up the Treasurer's account book as 
yet; but perhaps at the next pep meeting when we have a bonfire it will go up in smoke. 
We can't tell just what the outcome will be, but we feel that at least one of the members 
of the '15 bunch will buy a farm with the proceeds. One took a fine trip east and now 
perhaps the '16 gang can get a trip to the Pan-American Exposition. 



Two colored men were talking and one was heard to say that he hoped that the Irish 
would not be killed off during the present war, because the colored race would then be 
the most low down race on earth. 



We will have to put something in this paper about "Mike' 
would not read it. 



Ahearn or the people 



In this, the initial appearance of this publication The Spot Light, we think it 
proper to set forth the principles for which the paper stands. Primarily it stands for 
closer fellowship among the students of this institution, for a true College spirit in which 
all will participate — a thing which is conspicuously absent around K. S. A. C. — and for 
the betterment of all things and the introduction of new ideas, which will increase the 
welfare of this school. 

Proceeding on the theory that every knock is a boost, we will not hesitate to use the 
hammer when we see that something might be bettered by that means. If an organiza- 
tion is trying to do the things that are best for all the students, then we are for such an 
organization. But if they try to slip anything over, we will give them a knock that will 
boost them high enough for everyone to see their crooked methods. Fraternities and 
Sororities are conspicuous organizations in school, they will come in for their share of 
criticisms, but only just criticisms will be given, for others make enough unjust criticisms. 

If you want to take a midnight joy ride please leave town, so we won't have to write 
up the details. (DON'T GET IN THE SPOT LIGHT.) We are for athletics all the 
time but that department must produce the goods. 

Keep your mouth shut about this paper or we will tell you why you are against it. 
The Spot Light is printed in Kansas City, Mo., they are sent by express to a news 
dealer, no subscriptions are sold, single copies are 5 cents. 

President Waters and the Gamma Sigma Delia are enjoying a lively game of checkers 
in which the Kansas Aggie is the object. The latest returns show that it is Prexy's move. 



Perhaps the greatest word in the English language is Annette. 
"I." 



The second greatest 



The Seven Wonders of the World: Maynard Goudy, "Fat" Hooker, John Hunger- 
ford, Willard J. Loomis, Frank Sargent, Walter F. Smith and Wilmer H. Wilson. 

At least in one instance there is quite an affiliation between the Theta Chi and 
the Beta Theta Pi. 

Certain pledges at the Lambda house took suddenly sick the evening before initia- 
tion. "Grape-nuts." 

Prof. Wirt has broadened his scope in Ag. Engineering. He is now able to tell you 
all about a steam engine and also about "Fewell." 

I would never marry a girl for her money, but I could never love a girl who is 
poor. — "Al" Apitz. 

Prof. Wirt says there is no excuse for anyone stealing anything worth less than five 
dollars. 



485 



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SPOTLIGHT 



VOL. I 



FEBRUARY 13, 1915 



NO. 2 



THE AGGIE COMMANDMENTS 

I. Thou shalt love Kansas State with all thine heart, boost it with all thine breath 
(to the Ways and Means Committee), and study soils under Throckmorton with all 
thine understanding. 

II. Thou shalt not expectorate upon the main walk, nor in the classroom, nor in 
the main hall; neither shalt thou eject any spittle in any vehicle of transportation (es- 
pecially jitney cars), for the public health is a pearl of great price and must be protected 
by Bushnell and Jackley. 

III. Thou shalt not commit adulterated foods into the hands of thy brother when 
he is hungry for coal tar coloring is an abomination and benzoate of soda worketh evil 
to any man's belly. All things do in moderation, so says Dean Willard. 

IV. Thou shalt keep thy vows when thou goest into politics, John Hungerford; 
likewise hold thy tongue as to promises, Willie Barker, for the Aggie voter has a fearful 
and wonderful memory and the files of the Collegian shall never perish from off the face 
of the hill. 

V. Honor thy father and thy mother, for without them Kansas would still be a 
barren waste and thou wouldst not have thy "Benzine Buggies", Malcom Aye, nor thy 
herds of mid-winter SHORTHORNS, Prexy Waters, or thy many fields of alfalfa, 
Prof. Call. 

VI. Thou shalt swat the Knockers (Z. C. Rechels, L. A. Zimmerman, L. V. Rhine, 
and C. E. Roach) with a swatter, or in any other manner that shalt prove effective for 
verily they are a pest to this institution. And may a Student Activity Fee and various 
other calamities be visited upon them and their followers, aye unto the third and fourth 
generation of those that follow in their footsteps. 

VII. Thou shalt not give to thy neighbor strong drink lest thou both be damned 
(drunk). Say thou rather to him, "Go thou to Missouri and get thine own souse in thine 
own way." In this manner thou wilt fulfill the law and save thine own supply at the 
same time. 

VIII. When thou goest into the College Inn thou shalt say to Colson or Harry 
Wareham, "Hast thou nine foot bed sheets, individual towels and private drinking 
cups?" and if he sayeth nay, thou shalt flee from the place, for the wrath shall be upon his 
head, of the state, and thine own as well if thou goest in and abide with him. It is far 
better for thee to sleep in the A. H. Barn with the rest of the animals than to abide in a 
public place that cometh not up to the specifications of the Board of Administration. 

IX. Thou shalt not listen to the man who peddleth "Blue Sky" neither shalt thou 
lend thy influence to any man who seeketh to sell thy neighbor a gold brick (A Royal 
Purple), for as between the man who dealeth in unregistered securities and the man with 
a mill stone about his neck, the best bet is on the latter. 

X. Thou shalt not walk in the path of the Vets, nor in the stall of the A. H. men, 
nor sit in the seat of the Profs, for Kansas State is a great school (you betcher life) and 
within her halls are to be found some of the worst crooks outside of Lansing, some of the 
best specimens of (SQUIRREL FOOD) that have excaped Osawatomie, and all the 
Health and Happiness, Peace, Posterity, Pretty Girls and Politics that is coming to you 
this side of Graduation, a Happy Home and the Promised Land. 

The following men read the first issue of the "Spotlight" over the shoulder of a 
friend: A. C. Berry, Preston Hale, L. A. Mingenback, E. H. Smith. Some people 
would borrow a tooth brush from their friends if it wasn't for the fact that public opinion 
is against such a practice. 

When asked if the Lambda Farm was a myth or a reality, some one remarked that 
after walking out there in the slush one night, they had decided that it was a "reality." 

While Prexy was asleep at the switch the Gamma Sigma Deltas stole a move in that 
said checker game, and won by a large "Plurality." 

If the Sigma Phi Deltas wish to learn the new dances, it appears that they could find 
a more suitable place than the Wednesday night dances. 

You see it is not Dick Wilson's fault that there are two Misses Mann in this school. 
And to make matters worse, Dick could not distinguish their voices, either It was a 
choice on the part of the phone operator between 613 and 713, and of course she chose the 
wrong number. Hence one Miss Mann was left waiting at the church, while Dick amused 
tin' chaperon at the other house. 

Not everyone can fall as gracefully, especially in a dance hall, as Jack Husband and 



486 



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Alexander. One of the "Spotlight" reporters states that it was one of the most 
clever exhibitions of log rolling ever seen in Aggieville Hall. 

I first loved fair Eta Beta, and next a dear Phi Kappa Phi, 

The third on the list was a sweet Alpha Mu, I would keep her forever, thought I, 

But no — there comes a neat Lambda Theta, with eyes that made life sweet for me, 

But the light flickered out and I'm looking about, 

Will come Theta Chi help me out? 

(Korsmeier and Shelly.) 
The nine BIG GUNS of the hill: Don Irwin, Herbert Coith, Glenn C. Allen, Harry 
H. Coxen, Anson Ford, Frank Freeto, Jay L. Lush, James M. McArthur and Archie 
L. Marble. 

My wants are few and simple. I'd like a private car, a castle on the Hudson, a 
fifty cent cigar, a wife worth forty million, a rent producing flat, a stylish horse and bug- 
gy, and a few things like that. (E. H. Smith.) 



SPOTLIGHT 



VOL. I FEBRUARY 27, 1915. NO. 3 

The latest fad in gambling is that of flipping coins to see who gets the date, Jane 
Kingan, Erskine, and Shelley. We understand that there were some signs given and 
Shelly won two out of three. Care must be taken as there is a law in the State of Kansas 
against gambling. 



Everyone should buy a class book published by the class of 1915. There is no better 
way of advertising the college when you go home, than by taking a volume with you. 
Show it to your friends for it sure does represent the College in its everyday life and some 
of the stunts which are pulled off on Sundays. 

It has been called to our attention that very few people wearing Greek letter pins 
pass in Physics. "Freshmen Beware." 



"Kirt" Brewer made a fine run to his second hour class on the holiday February 22. 

WHAT IS A "GOOD SPORT"? 

What has life in a Chapter House to do with being a sport? Just this — if the 
steward, the house manager, the treasurer, the officers are good sports, they will do their 
duty and make good. The good sport pays his room rent, his board bills and dues 
The cheap, tin horn variety, lets them slide. That the other boys are feeding him and 
giving him a home does not worry him. He takes his money and plunges on the outside 
He "mooches." He never buys his own tobacco, and often shines conspicuous in Tom's 
hat, Tubby's tie or Cupid's suit. 

The good sport is never a snob. The cheap sport generally evinces a willingness to 
do anything but work. He takes but seldom gives. He is a discordant note He 
"knocks" much and "boosts" little. He is supremely selfish. 

Some people stand in Main hall because it is cold and there is no other place to go 
Others stand there in expectation of seeing a friend. But the large majority stand there 
because they don't know any better, and the significant fact is that the same people are 
there every day. 

Most everybody is looking for a clean collar job with a thirty horse-power salary 

(BOB BONNETT.) 

Doubtless an automobile is a handy thing to have around the farm, but a manure 
spreader is a good thing, too. (MILNER) 



Tact is the ability to tell a woman her face powder shows without letting her knov 
that you have noticed it. 



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SPOTLIGHT 



VOL. I 



MARCH 27, 1915. 



NO. 5 



MORE INFORMATION WANTED! 

Who is the Pi Kappa Alpha pledge, with the High School class, that queers the boys 
at the Alpha Mu House? (Much Oblige.) 



The new sanitarium at 1521 Leavenworth, for those who wish to cut their regular 
Wednesday night fraternity meeting, is always available. Ask Sig Alph Hunter. Even 
tho Charley Hunter is engaged and love is blind, he should be more careful about pulling 
down the curtains at the Lambda House hereafter. 



"Tub" Reed of the Vet. department broke the Missouri Valley record last week 
in the broad expectoration event at 22 ft. and 7 inches. "Fat" Hooker took second 
with the distance of 21 ft. and 7 inches. 



We notice that some of the fellows still persist in reading the "Spotlight" and "Col- 
legian" over the other fellow's shoulder. The following are reported as having done 
this with our last issue: Charles Hunter, Stanley Baker, Bob Cushman, Leon Taylor, 
Lloyd Reudy, Mark Lindsey, Bob Sellars, Harry Vaupel, Horace Chittenden and Fred 
Layton. 



The "Spotlight" has made a horrible mistake for which we will never be able to 
make compensation We used Chas. H. Zimmerman's name when we intended to use 
L. A. Zimmerman's. We feel that we can never justify this horrible, disgraceful mistake, 
but we hope that Chas. H. will forgive us. 



There are many clever pens buried in the "Spotlight," but it is such putrifying 
organisms as Windy Smith, Buchanan and Sargent that are causing our rapid decay. 

For information concerning Yuma Street, inquire of 0. W. Beeler. 



The Sororities at K. S. A. C. have always made friends with the non-sorority girls. 
It is very much better at this school than at K. U. But along comes a girl from K. U. 
by the name of HILDA MENSE and writes a paper on Sorority dope and reads it in 
class. Some of her fellow-classmates may not have thought much about the paper, but 
we would suggest that she keep such stuff at her little pink Sorority house on Bluemont. 



FRATERNITY JEWELRY FOR RENT 
Hilda Mense claims that she can wear an appropriate fraternity pin to every fra- 
ternity dance given in town. 



Nichols Gym has been pressed into service as a spoonholder. Earl V. Kesinger 
and Marjorie Garnett hold a class there every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Fri- 
day morning during chapel hour. The class is usually dismissed with a kiss. We are 
of the opinion that Miss Garnett is the teacher; at any rate, both are very proficient in 
the art of insanitary love making. 

On the landing of the stairs they sat. 
He held her hand, she held his hat, 
They kissed — I saw them do it. 
He held that kissing was no crime, 
She held her head up every time, 
I held my peace and wrote this rhyme, 
And they thought no one knew it. 



Tlfflft 



It takes a boob like Wallace Hutchinson to bawl a man out for wearing a borrowed 
overcoat, after he himself had borrowed everything from socks to nightshirt. 



488 



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SPOTLIGHT 



VOL. I 



APRIL 10, 1915. 



NO. 6 



We should have a Hall of Fame at K. S. A. C. and to start a good thing along we 
vill suggest a few people who should have their pictures in such a hall: 
Prof. Waters— To give a distinguished shade to the group. 
Jimmy Linn — For the same reason as above. 
Ralph Heppe— We would need two headliners at least. 
Fred Layton — Because of his beauty. 
W. F. Smith— Popular Boy of 1914-1915. 
Ruth Hill— Popular Girl of 1914-1915. 
K. G. Baker— The Cowboy from Texas. 
Jack Richards— The only living specimen of its kind. 
James Colt— One of the fixtures of the Hill. 
Shorty Fowler— He is so two-faced that we could turn either one of his faces to the 

front. 
H. H. Haymaker — Just an all around fine fellow. 
Erk Erskine — Just because he belongs there. 



Speaking of getting street addresses mixed, you should know how Elbert L. Smith 
got into the wrong house over on Vattier. He walked into the house, went up stairs, 
knocked on the door where he supposed W. C. Calvert was rooming, and in place of 
Calvert's voice bidding him enter, there came a feminine voice. Smith, being surprised 
and shocked at this, ran all the way down stairs and into the street. 



There is one man in this school who doesn't toot his own horn, so we will toot it for 
him. Charles H. Zimmerman is a Junior Engineer, Sigma Tau, on the Lyceum Commit- 
tee, takes active part in a literary society and is drum major of the band; besides this, he 
makes good grades. We just want to use this as an example of what some of the best 
students do. 

Will wonders never cease? The average man's arm is 36 inches long. The average 
woman is 36 inches around the waist. 



CABBAGE LEAVES 

For good health: Keep your windows open and your mouth shut. 
Smith, get wise and improve your health. 



"Windy" 



The State fish and game warden is planning to distribute crabs to the streams of 
Kansas as food for the turtles. The crabs are to be selected from different towns over 
the state, The Manhattan candidates are Zeno Rechels, L. V. Rhine, P. L. Netterville, 
and T. E. Pexton. — The Sunday Sun. 



Someone please give Morgan Binney a jitney, because it has been reported by one 
of his friends that he is a habitual moocher on the "Spotlight." If you have a defense 
to make, Morgan, please drop us a line. 



Domestic Science Jordan says, "We should Booble." Is this strictly a Domestic 
Science term or does it have something to do with raising a family? 



The "FIRST ANNUAL HEN SORORITY DANCE" will be held on Saturday 
Afternoon; April 10. Some fine exhibitions of masculine feminority will doubtless 
be displayed. We understand that there will be no distinction made between gentle- 
men and poultry, but we trust that proper position will be maintained at all times. 



489 



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BE CAREFUL 



WEBS 6rEUF?05. 




LETS GO. 




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WE DO. 



VERMA-DE/AR HEART. 



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PETE. 



CHIEF miE 
SHAVER. &OUDY 



MAMMIE 
HOOKER. 









READY FOR THE FIELD. 



AND WE ARE PREACHERS SONS 

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BJLL-MRBLE. "»■ ^mm HIGH MINDED 

THE TERM6TER. UtW 



sr^ 




/or* — J -^ g" < Y> s 




It has been the aim of the 1915 Royal Purple to make 
every page of this work, from front cover to back, as attrac- 
tive and interesting as possible, and we sincerely trust that 
our endeavor will meet with the approval of every reader. 



This result is only possible through the courtesy and 
patronage of its advertisers ; and in order to accomplish this 
end, the 1915 Royal Purple Board has distributed throughout 
the advertising beautiful campus vievre and characteristic 
scenes of college life and activities. 



In behalf of its advertisers, the 1915 Royal Purple Board 
wishes to recommend them for your patronage. 




529 














C~>'^ 



{amersMaifandBreeze 

— Edited <6y its Readers 

To know what the other fellow is doing— 
and give him the benefits of your results 



For the stimulus of contact with 
the other men who are doing 
things in Kansas Agriculture — the 
inspiration of week after week 
convention and institute — 

For the sum and substance of the 
best that's being achieved by the 
thousands of other experimenters 
in the great farm laboratory — 

Farmers cMail 
and freeze 

Farmers Mail and Breeze is clean, 
sane, broad minded, genial, pithy, 
and practical. It is not a funny 
magazine, but neither does it re- 
gard farming as an occupation 
calling for unnatural solemnity. It 
is not narrowly partisan, but it 
recognizes that fact that the farm- 
ers are intensely interested in a 
broad way in civic and social im- 
provements. It is more 
successful than any 
other farm paper we 
know in securing the 
kind of reading matter 
described in 
the "Kansas 
Industrialist." 



mm 



"The best material that a farm 
paper can give to its readers is 
matter prepared on the farm by 
the farmers themselves. Ask any 
farmer what he considers the most 
valuable part of the farm paper 
that comes to his home weekly, 
and the chances are ten to one 
that he will say the letters that 
come from farmers that suggest 
new ideas and tell of new ways 
that have proved profitable on the 
farm. But these "experience 
stories" with their first hand value 
are not obtained, particularly if 
farmers are not encouraged to 
write them." 

52 weeks for $1.00. Worth that 
much often for one suggestion. 

Topeka, Kansas. Publisher. 





531 



R. E. LOFINCK 



STIC-TITE EYEGLASSES 



FIT ANY 
SHAPE 

OF 
NOSE 




STIC 



TITE 



THEY 

STICK 

ALL THE 

TIME 



THEY ARE EASY FITTING 



■hie » 



College Spoons 
Spectacles 

FITTED HIEE 
Doll Cabs 
Wagoiu 



R. E. LOFINCK 

I 



LI V -SCtjoj 



J 

One H 



Elgin "' 



COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS 



College China 
Suit Cases 

AND TRUNKS 
Sporting 

Goods 



Elgin *•» Waltham Watches: $7- 



Fine Jewelry= CLOCKS =1847 Rogers Ware 



One Halt Price On Violins, Guitars, Mandolins, Etc. 




Ml 

Watches 

And Jewelry 

Fully Warranted 





"My Linen skirts are awf'ly short. 

Now I don't think that's wrong, 
And Mama says that Faultless Starch, 

Will make them wear quite long." 




FREE with Each Ifc Packa(e-Aa hKcresiW Book -for Children. 





^tlorxtgo mere's 

Stu&io 

~pl)otograpl)s 

Ohat OalK 

Cor. 1 1th and Moro 



532 



Exclusive 

Footwear 





\ 29. 



329 POYNTZ 
AVENUE 







533 



Jpalace 

T)ru3 (To* 

TWO STORES 

1 1 5 South Fourth Street 

1226 Moro Street 

!Ko6aks an6 
Supplies 


Gillette Hotel 
barber SI)op 

SIX CHAIRS 

Special Attention 
Giben Students 

W. E. RECTOR 


TLisk I3win 
;pl)otograpl)ers 

Featuring 

POPULAR PRICED 

PHOTOS 

Two Shops 

ROOM 4, MARSHALL BLDG. 

1212 MORO STREET 


French Dry Cleaning 

College Oailor Sljop 

W. p. barber, prop. 

Ladies' and Gent's Clothes 
Cleaned and Pressed 

Phone 398. 1200 MORO ST. 

We Call and Deliver 


Z3l)e 
7 r inter? 

{K. S. A. C. 1912) 

JOB PRINTING 

EXCLUSIVELY 

OVER LOFINCK'S. Phone 575 
Manhattan, Kansas 


STAR GROCERY 

Groceries 
cMeats 

SEE US FOR LUNCHES 

JOHN COONS, Proprietor 



534 



E. L. Knostman 
ClothingCompany 

MANHATTAN'S 
GREATEST OUTFIT- 
TERS TO YOUNG MEN 




535 



~3ian$a$ State 
Collegian 

A loyal paper published by the 
Students and for the Students 



Remember — The Collegian prints all the 

news that's fit to print — and 

prints it first. 



Don't be a moocher! 
Read your own paper! 



By subscription, $1.50 the year 

Fifty cents the quarter 

Five cents the copy 



v 



536 




THE BEST OF SHOWS 
J. J. MARSHALL THEATER CO. 



For Dances or Parties 

The 

Aggicvillc Dancing 

Academy 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, 

Manager. 
Phones 722 or 262 

1200 Moro Street 



B 

w 

''*-''WKBm Urn* 


^^1 I 

- H I 
■ IIS : 

I • -J&k ■ Ac. 









537 



Quality Work Only 



Special Attention Given 
to Student Work 

One-Half Block From K. S. A. C. Campus 

A.V. LAUNDRY CO. 

1219 MORO STREET MANHATTAN, KANSAS 




538 



E. R. Moore Company 



MAKERS OF 



COLLEGIATE CAPS, GOWNS 
AND HOODS 




ORIGINATORS OF 

MOORE'S OFFICIAL HIGH SCHOOL 
CAPS AND GOWNS 



ANNUAL DISTRIBUTERS OF CAPS AND GOWNS TO 
THE GRADUATING CLASSES OF KANSAS STATE 



932 TO 938 DAKIN ST. CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



539 



'^&rocl)OR 



** 



Fraternity Jewelry 
Leather Goods 
College Novelties 



Embossed Stationery 
Wedding Invitations 
Calling Cards 



5 South Wabash Avenue, 

CHICAGO 



The 

Kansas City Veterinary 

College 



EXCELLENT CLINICAL 
FACILITIES 



.330 East Fifteenth Street 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 



WE SPECIALIZE IN THE DESIGN, 
MANUFACTURE AND ERECTION OF 

Elevated Steel Tanks and 
Standpipes 

For Municipal, Railroad and Factory Service. 
We also build Oil Tanks. Coaling Stations, 
Turntables. Buildings and Struc- 
tural Material. 




CHICAGO BRIDGE & IRON WORKS 




540 



The Following Are Members 



OF 



Topeka Merchants' 
Association 



Borkson Bros. 


Merchants' National Bank. 


Crosby Bros. Co. 


Mills Dry Goods Co. 


D. 0. Coe. 


Chas. A. Moore. 


Warren M. Crosby Co. 


National Hotel. 


Crane & Co. 


E. L. Overton. 


Capital Building & Loan. 


Palace Clothing Co. 


Continental Creamery Co. 


L. M. Penwell. 


Crockett-Moore Co. 


Polk-Redges Directory Co. 


Consumers' Light, Heat and 


The Payne Shoe Co. 


Power Co. 


Shawnee Building & Loan. 


Fullerton Bros. 


Street Railway Co. 


Gertsley-Crawford Co. 


Shawnee Insurance Co. 


E. B. Guild Music Co. 


J. D. Sullivan. 


Inter Ocean Mills. 


Geo. W. Stansfield. 


Karlan Furniture Co. 


Topeka Daily Capital. 


W. W. Kimball Co. 


Topeka Pure Milk Co. 


Mclntire Bros. 


Wolff Packing Co. 


Merchants' Transfer Co. 


Walk-Over Boot Co. 


Your Patronage 




Is 


Respectfully Solicited 



541 



Kansas City School of Caw 

1013-15 Grand Ave.— Nonquitt Bldg. 
KANSAS CITY, - MISSOURI 



A Practical and Thorough Legal Education. 

The Faculty is Composed of Practising Judges and Leading Lawyers 
and We Prepare Our Graduates for Practice of Law. 

Tuition Payable in Monthly Installments or in Advance. 

WRITE FOR CATALOG OR CALL 



E. D. ELLISON, Dean BEN E. TODD, Registrar 

ELMER N. POWELL, Secretary and Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES: 

718-19 Commerce Building, 

Students May Enter at Any Time. KANSAS CITY, MO. 




**%**M» ■*» 



s^K^mnw^^^u 




542 



$15,000 in Cash-$ 1,000 Per Year for Past 
Fifteen Years— Has Been Given Outright By 

Clay, Robinson & Co. 

For the Benefit of Live Stock Producers 
in this country in the following manner: 

Years ago the firm of Clay, Robinson & Company recognized the very 
important bearing which the Agricultural Colleges have upon the live 
stock industry. They saw that out of these colleges would come the men 
who would farm, breed and feed scientifically — whose work would be an 
example to others, and it was with a view of forwarding and furthering 
the great work of the colleges that our Mr. John Clay guaranteed an 
annual appropriation of $1,000 in special prizes for cattle, hogs and sheep 
exhibited at the International Live Stock Exposition each year by the 
various Agricultural Colleges. This year (1915) brings the total expendi- 
ture for this purpose up to $15,000.00. 

Chicago, III; Kansas City, Mo.; South Omaha, Neb.; 
Denver, Col.; Sioux City, la.; East Buffalo, N. Y.; 
South St. Joseph, Mo.; St. Louis, Mo.; South St. Paul, 
Minn.; Fort Worth, Texas. 



Massachusetts Mutual Life 
Insurance Company 



Incorporated 1851 



SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

REPRESENTED BY 

T Q TTAPPOTn MANHATTAN, 

JL. O. ll A J\ J\ U L LI KANSAS. 




"Here is the Answer;" in 

Webster's New International! 

Every day in your talk and reading-, at home, on the j 
street car, in the office, shop and school you likely ! 
question the meaning of some new word. This New : 
Creation answers all kinds of questions with final \ 
authority. 

More than 400.000 Words. 6000 Illustrations. 
2700 Pages. Cost $400,000. New Divided Page. 
1 India-Paper Edition: On thin, opaque, strong, imported ! 
India paper. One half the thickness and weight of ! 
the Regular Edition. 
Regular Edition: On strong hook paper. "Weight ! 
14% lbs. Size 12% x 9% x 5 inches. 

WRITE for specimen pages of both Editions. 

G. & C. MERRIAM COMPANY, Springfield, Mass. 



tnIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIii 



543 



SUITS THAT TALK 



Our suits talk the wearers' prosperity. 

Give yourself a boost — young man — going forth into 
the world, by wearing our good Clothes. 

The young man who is correctly attired is usually 
"adhering" where the other fellow fails. 

High grade but not High Priced. 

Our suits this year at $20, $25 and $30 are certainly 
the best suits at the price we have ever seen in all our 
years of experience in the clothing business. 



W. S. ELLIOT 

MANHATTAN, KANSAS 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE 




544 



DO YOU KNOW WHOSE 

Slogan This Is? 

"Giving Satisfaction 

Is a B. P. Attraction 

If not, ask the editor. 

Then write us and we will send 
you free of charge 

"A Book for Modern Greeks" 

Address 

The Fraternity Jewelers 

Station A, DETROIT 



>> 



Liekt Weight Costan Engines 

Do all the work ordinary engines 
do and some work other engines 
cannot do. 

4 CYCLE— 4 TO 20 HP. 

The One Practical Binder Engine 

Not Cheap, but Good. 

See it at the College and write for 
free catalogue. 




4 HP.— 190 Pounds. 

Note Special Features, 



CUSHMAN MOTOR WORKS 93 ° N - 2Ut Street - 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Jacob Reeds Sons 

Manufacturers of 

GOLD MEDAL UNIFORMS 

Our equipment and facilities for producing uniforms for Colleges and 
Military Schools are unequalled by any other house in the United States. 
You are sure of intelligent and accurate service in ordering of us. 



The Uniforms worn at the 

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

are finished examples of the character, quality and appearance of our 
product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons 

1424-1426 Chestnut Street - - - PHILADELPHIA 



545 











Wfs Studio 

^portraits 

112 North Fifth Street 

We keep all Negatives on file and 
can make you duplicates at any time 










"A Paper for the Entire Family" 

In Making a Selection of 
Family Reading Material 

You should select a newspaper that 
will interest every member of the 
family — a newspaper that is bene- 
ficial to father and son the same as 
mother or daughter — a newspaper 
that has clean interesting depart- 


JFirst Matioita 

MANHATTAN, KANSAS 


I 


Capital - - $100,000.00 
Capital and Profits - $100,000.00 


United States Depository. 




J5\ 

Ma 


Ask for a Sample Copy of this 
12-page Newspaper 

)& 3\il<t£ Count? democrat 

F. D. LAMB, Publisher 

nhattan, - - Kansas 


OFFICERS: 

GEO. E. MURPHY .... President 

C. F. LITTLE Vice President 

J. C. EWING Cashier 

C M. BREESE .... Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Geo. E. Murphy Geo. W. Washington 
J. F. O'Danial H. P. Wareham 
C. F. Little C. M. Breese 
E. A. Whaeton J. C. Ewing 



546 



Established in 1905 Telephone 227 

AUTOMOBILE DELIVERY 

JOHN F. HARRISON 

Groceries isi Meats, Pure Ice Cream 
and Confectionery 

The Popular Ice Cream Parlors 
and Cafe Delicatessen 

1114-1116-1118 MORO STREET 



Students' Headquarters 



Lo<wne^s Chocolates 










547 




Manhattan 
Business 
College 

This School Is Noted 

for the Thoroughness 

of Its Work 

COURSES: 

Commercial Shorthand, 
English, Banking, Civil Ser- 
vice, Court Reporting 

L. W. NUTTER, President 

MANHATTAN, - - KANSAS 



A Business Is Judged 
By Its Service 



As our cash sales have shown a 
steady increase over previous 
years we feel that the students 
appreciate our effort to render 
mutual satisfaction with each pur- 
chase. 



This Store Appreciates 
Your Patronage. 



College Book Store 

LAURENCE H. ENDACOTT, Manager 



Askren's 



Repairing and Manufacturing 
Jeweler and Optician 

If your watch needs repairing, 
glasses broken, clocks, fountain 
pens and jewelry, 

COME TO US 

QUICK SERVICE AND EXPERT 
WORKMEN 




TWO STORES 

COLLEGE STORE 

308^ Poyntz Ave. 1220 Moro St. 



548 



J. B. FLOERSCH, President F. A. FLOERSCH, Vice President 

C. A. FLOERSCH, Assistant Cashier 



l£niort National !&artk 



MANHATTAN, KANSAS 



Capital and Surplus, $75,000 



WE SOLICIT YOUR BUSINESS 




"The Quality Store' 

LANTZ- YOUNG 
COMPANY 

Dry Goods, Carpets and 
Ladies' ^Ready-to- Wear 

Phone 5 325 Poyntz Abe. 



549 



ANDERSON MOTOR COMPANY 

Harley-Davidson 

Motorcycles 

206 Poyntz Ave., 
Manhattan, Kansas 

Phone 103 

Machines to 1{ent to Tie sponsible 
Persons 




"We Appreciate Your Business." 

Manhattan Furniture Co. 

F. G. MORTIBOY, Manager. 

Phone 209 413 POYNTZ 

THE HOME OF BETTER FURNITURE, FLOOR COVERINGS and DRAPERIES 

Lasting Satisfaction With Every Transaction. 



Student's Home 

College Inn 



Where the students meet for re- 
freshment with their lady and 
gentleman friends. Built and 
furnished for your place of amuse- 
ment, and we welcome you to sup- 
port this place at all times, and to 
keep it up to its standard. Light 
Lunches and Banquets served to 
small or large parties at a very 
low price. 

Always see us before placing any 
orders for the same and we will 
treat you right. 



The Royal Purple 

AND 

The Manhattan Steam 
Laundry 



are gaining in favor 
each year. 



When you leave, tell new 
students about us. 



3 Wagons 



Student Drivers 



Phone 157 



550 



RAY Man? g t LOM atwtottte* <tt0-np*ratiw iHerrattttb (Enmpany D ™£^S 

(incorporated) Athletic Supplies 

College Jewelry 
Fountain Pens 

STUDENTS' HEADQUARTERS Text Books 

Stationery 
Pennants 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Manhattan. KanaaB, June 17, 1915 

To the Class of 1915: 

We desire to express our appreciation for your co-operation with us 
during your residence in Manhattan which has contributed largely to our 
success. "Where-ever the coming years may find you we shall be glad to 
serve you with the same careful consideration and courteous treatment which, 
we trust has made our dealings mutually satisfactory. 

Your mail orders will be given as careful attention as your personal 
dealings. 

Again thanking you for your liberal patronage and trusting that we 
shall be able to serve you in the future, we are, 

Respectfully yours, 
Students Co-operative Mercantile Co. 
Ray H. Pollom, Manager. 























551 



KITTELL'S VARSITY SHOP 

THE MEN'S WEAR STORE 



Now in New Location- 



[222 MORO STREET 



ROGERS & BOD I NE 

Oldest Barbers 

in Aggieville 

WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE 



MANHATTAN, KANSAS 
Quality Uniformly Upward. Prices Always Downward 




A. F. HUSE 



GEO. D. PAGE 



Handle All the Best Grades 
of 

COAL and WOOD 

Office, 115 POYNTZ AVE. 

Phone 55 

Yards, Corner Third and Leavenworth Sts. 



The cModern Tailors, 
Cleaners and dressers 

Best Equipped Estab- 
lishment in the City 

Our greatest assets are satisfied customers. 

We are increasing our assets daily. 

We Make Ladies' and 
Gentlemen's Clothing 

W. L. HOUT 

Come and See Us 
1218 Mora Street, MANHATTAN, KAS. 



S. J. PRATT, A. N. BLACKMAN, 

President Cashier 

V. V. AKIN, Vice President 
F. D. ELLIOT, Ass't Cashier 



(Citizens %\a\i ^&ank 



3Ztanl)attan, Kansas 



YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO 
DO YOUR BANKING WITH US 



552 



Go-Education 

Watejttnan 



Regular 

Safety and 

Self- Filling Types 



[deal) 



For Sale at 

the Best Stores 

Everywhere 



FbunMfriPen 



L. E. Waterman Company 




173 Broadway, N. Y. 




553 




KANSAS leads the world in the 
excellence of her Wheat Flour 

WICHITA is t h e heart 
of her milling industry 



WICHITA'S BEST 

is the pinnacle of 
Perfect Flour Production 



BUY 

WICHITA'S 
BEST 



$2 or S3 

is the right price 
to pay for your 

Spring Hat 

Large Assortment— Best Values 

Woolworth Hat Co. 

927 Walnut St., 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 



J. L. JOHNS 

Ice Creams, Sherbets 
and Ices 

Confectionery of All Kinds 

1 123 MORO 




554 



=n 




th* Electric City Engraving Co. 

B UFFALO, N.Y. 



Wf MADE THE ENGRAVINGS FOR THIS BOOK. 



E= 



555 



UNION BANK NOTE CO. 

EQUIPMENT— SERVICE— QUALITY 

Printing, Lithographing, Steel Die Embossing, 
Blank Book Manufacturing 




College Catalogues and Annuals, Diplomas, Class Rolls, 
Programs and Invitations. 

HIGHEST QUALITY WEDDING AND SOCIAL STATIONERY 

Engraved Copperplate Announcements, Invitations and Calling Cards, Dainty 
Programs for musicals, recitals, etc. Steel die embossed and illuminated Cor- 
respondence Stationery for fraternities, clubs, etc. Souvenir Dance Programs 
and Banquet Menus in leather and silk, produced by skilled 
artisans in our modern factory. 

100 ENGRAVED CARDS AND PLATE, $1.50 

Quire Box of Stationery and Envelopes Stamped with any National Fraternity die, 75c 



UNION BANK NOTE CO. 

FRANKLIN D. CRABBS, President 

TENTH AND CENTRAL STREETS, KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 

THIS BOOK IS A SAMPLE OF OUR WORK 



556 



A TRAINED CITIZENSHIP IS A GREAT ASSET OF ANY STATE 

The Kansas State Agricultural College 

MANHATTAN 

Established in 1863 by Act of Congress primarily for training in 
AGRICULTURA AND MECHANIC ARTS 
Since 1873, when State appropriations enabled it to reorganize, this has been one of the 
leading industrial and vocational schools in America 

(A) THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE, (Secondary School) 

Admits students over 14 years of age direct from the common schools on certificate 
or common school diploma or upon examination 

COURSES IN SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Agriculture Mechanic Arts Home Economics 

Trains for Practical Farming. Trains for Trades. Trains for the Home. 

(B) THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, ENGINEERING, 
HOME ECONOMICS 

Admits studenta who have diplomas from accredited high schools or other secondary 

schools of equal rank 

Admits students from the School of Agriculture, on Certificate 

Admits as Special Students those who are mature, but with less academic training 

COURSES OF STUDY, (Four Years) 

AGRICULTURE, including courses in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairy Hus- 
bandry, Horticulture. 

HOME ECONOMICS, including courses in Domestic Science and Domestic Art. 

VETERINARY MEDICINE. 

ENGINEERING, including Mechanical Engineering, Gas and Power Engineering, 
Electrical Engineering, and Highway Engineering. 

GENERAL SCIENCE, offering opportunity to specialize in Chemistry, Physics. Botany, 
Zoology or Entomology, English or History. 

(C) WINTER SHORT COURSE 

HOUSEKEEPERS' COURSE. — Opens with the Fall term and continues for two terms. 
FARMERS' SHORT COURSE. — Opens with the Winter term and continues for ten 

weeks. 
MECHANICS' SHORT COURSE.— Opens with the Winter term and continues for 

ten weeks. Gas and Steam Engines, Concrete Work, Road Building, Shop Work 

(Blacksmithing or Carpentry). 

SPECIAL PAMPHLETS.— Veterin- 
ary School, School of Agriculture, College 
Courses, Mechanic Arts, Farmers' Short 
Course, Mechanics' Short Course, Gen- 
eral Science, Home Economics, CATA- 
LOGUE. These may be had on request 
to President H. J. Waters, Box 13. 

Correspondence Courses offered in over one hundred subjects. 



557 



FALL TERM 
Opens Sept. 

17 



FALL TERM 

Opens Sept. 

17 



FAIRBANKS 
SCALES 

FAIRBANKS -MORSE 

OIL ENGINES 

OIL TRACTORS 

LIGHTING PLANTS 



FAIRBANKS- 
MORSE & CO. 

KANSAS CITY . . . MISSOURI 



558